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  #26  
Old August 7th, 2006, 03:33 PM
nosivad_bor nosivad_bor is offline
Rob Davison
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 1,020
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
Is there any practical difference between that hollow putter and the Futura? No. Yet the Futura is conforming. Unreal.

I wish the USGA and Royal & Ancient both interpreted anything more than this to be in violation of the "plain in shape" requirement:



but it clearly says "Exceptions may be made for putters."

so to me that means anything goes for putters.

I had my hand in this creation:

http://www.flatsticks.com/product_in...9e8a04ee27677c

as well as the other delacruz "wolfram" irons.

We made the tungsten carbide preforms that fit into the face, more dense than lead and approaching diamond hardness I've always considered it a gimmick, but it was work
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  #27  
Old August 7th, 2006, 03:40 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 12,539
I'm totally cool with the banning of the Anser neck. It's hideously ugly anyway. It would be sweet if everyone were using Calamity Janes.

Here's another beef I have with the interpretation of the Rules:


"a. General
A club is an implement designed to be used for striking the ball and generally comes in three forms: woods, irons and putters distinguished by shape and intended use. A putter is a club with a loft not exceeding ten degrees designed primarily for use on the putting green.

The club must not be substantially different from the traditional and customary form and make. The club must be composed of a shaft and a head. All parts of the club must be fixed so that the club is one unit, and it must have no external attachments except as otherwise permitted by the Rules."


Let's look at the second paragraph. A club shall not be substantially different from the traditional and customary form and make. That's cool. But how on earth does something like this have traditional and customary form and make?:




The long putter varies from tradition and custom in two major ways:

(1) The long putter has two grips, not one. How many traditional clubs have two grips? None.

(2) The long putter permits a third point of contact between the golfer's body and the club instead of the traditional two. Traditionally, the golfer contacts the club only with his hands. That's two points of contact. With the long putter, the golfer may press his support hand against his chest or chin and lets the putter swing like a pendulum with the chest or chin as the axis. Traditionally, it was up to the player and his skill to create a pendulum with his shoulders rather than with an implement.

The decree that the long putter is conforming fundamentally changes the nature of golf. I'd like to see the long putter be declared non-conforming.

The belly putter is similar to the long putter. The belly putter usually has only one grip, but it is designed to permit the player to press the end of the grip into his stomach, creating a fixed point for the creation of a pendulum effect. The three points of contact against the body violate the spirit of the rules and purpose of golf. Golf is supposed to be difficult. The equipment is supposed to be difficult to use. Otherwise, we'd all be putting with these:




I think it was Mark Twain who described golf as "a game, the object of which is to propel a ball into a small hole with implements singularly unsuited to the task." Mark Twain gets it.

Another one that gets me is the interpretation of this clause: "All parts of the club must be fixed so that the club is one unit, and it must have no external attachments except as otherwise permitted by the Rules."

As written, it is fine. However, how on earth is something like this deemed to have all of its parts fixed?:




The R7 permits the player to swap out weights at will. I thought that "all parts of the club must be fixed so that the club is one unit". And yet the R7 is deemed conforming.

I understand that the player may not change out the R7's components during a round, but that does not mean the R7's components are fixed. They clearly are not.

I truly admire the job the USGA does to preserve the spirit and integrity of the game. I wholeheartedly agreed with the USGA's previous prohibition of trampoline drivers, despite tremendous pressure from the Royal & Ancient and club manufacturers. But some of the USGA's equipment rulings puzzle me.
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  #28  
Old August 7th, 2006, 04:16 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 12,539
Quote:
Originally Posted by nosivad_bor
I had my hand in this creation:

http://www.flatsticks.com/product_in...9e8a04ee27677c

as well as the other delacruz "wolfram" irons.

We made the tungsten carbide preforms that fit into the face, more dense than lead and approaching diamond hardness I've always considered it a gimmick, but it was work


The tunsten insert thing is popular. I'm not feeling it. No club, whether conforming or not, is ever going to be forgiving enough. The more forgiving a club is, the less feedback there is to the player on mishits. The less feedback there is to the player, the more sloppy the player will become and his game will suffer in the end.

It's a vicious cycle. A player using blade clubs wants more forgiveness, so he goes to cavity clubs. Soon he can't hit the cavity clubs, so he tries something even more forgiving, like cavity clubs with tunsten weights. Soon he can't hit those even, so he looks for something even more forgiving. He won't be able to hit those either.

No club, however forgiving, whether conforming or not, is ever going to be forgiving enough.
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  #29  
Old August 7th, 2006, 05:02 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 12,539
Check out this variation of the Futura:







It is not "generally plain in shape".

It features "holes through the head".

It feaures "appendages to the main body of the head such as ... rods or fins".

I realize that "exceptions may be made for putters" but the fact that the Futura is deemed to be conforming is ridiculous.
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  #30  
Old August 7th, 2006, 05:56 PM
nosivad_bor nosivad_bor is offline
Rob Davison
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 1,020
while on the subject. I used to have a customer who made lead frame computer connectors by use of progressive carbide dies, his system was one of the first to go from metal strip to stamped lead and then in the same process mold the plastic around it. fairly innovative when they started doing it as it was a big value added step for his customers. Anyway I met the owner at the Euroblech sheet metal show in hannover a few years ago. he was pimping this golf club that was priced at some $1300. I thought it was some kind of exotic side business but it really seams to have a lot of effort behind it.

When talking with the guy he explained that it was built to very high tolerance and was made to be exclusive. anyway here is a link to the site, including a neat video of the production.

http://www3.kramski.de/117.html
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  #31  
Old August 7th, 2006, 06:54 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 12,539
I like those Kramski putters. I wouldn't be caught dead with one in my bag, but I really like the high-tech production methods used and the alignment tools incorporated into the top of the head.

Because the Rules require the player to stand to the side of the ball and never behind the ball, misalignment is a huge factor in missed putts, much more than most people realize. The blockish shape and the alignment lines incorporated into the Kramski putters make a big difference. The putter is actually well designed. The head is large enough that it can sit flat against the green. The player can use the alignment lines to ensure that his head is directly over the ball, where it should be. Kramski even sells a marking tool so that the player can Sharpie a line on his ball:


http://www3.kramski.de/236.html


This marking of the ball with an alignment aid is perfectly within the Rules and in conformance with good golfing practice and etiquette. In fact, the Rules actually recommend it:


"The responsibility for playing the proper ball rests with the player. Each player should put an identification mark on his ball."


If you find a ball you think is yours but cannot positively identify it, you are required to declare your ball lost and take the penalty. All good players mark their balls. The common verbal "I'm playing an orange Pinnacle no. 5" to your playing partners on the first tee is the mark of a hack. I love it when hackers say that on the first tee, as if they were being legit or something by saying it. Only rookies say that stupid shit. What a crack up. Mark your balls.

If you're going to mark your ball, you may as well do so in a manner that helps your game. So I'm digging that marker that Kamski sells. Justin Leonard uses an almost identical Sharpie mark on his personal balls, and Titleist balls purposely come with an undimpled equator for alignment purposes. Watch pros on Tour and you see will see them align the ball with the equator when on the green so that the heaviest part of the ball is rolling right along the intended path and less likely to veer off course by imperfections in the green.

The alignment marker on the ball and the alignment markers on top of the putter really make a difference.

So the Kramski gets a thumbs up for alignment but a thumbs down for appearance. So Kramski is hit or miss with me.

Here's some more hit or miss: If you want to see some totally bad ass stuff, check out the official letters from the Royal & Ancient and the USGA on this page:


http://www3.kramski.de/110.html


That's fucking awesome. However, stuff like this is totally lame:


http://www3.kramski.de/239.html


That just screams hacker. Junk like this is also the mark of a hack:


http://www3.kramski.de/237.html


The good player marks his ball with coins, usually a quarter when he's far from the hole and his marker is not in the way, and an old penny when he's close to the hole and his mark could be distracting to his playing partners.

The reason for the coin is so it may be flipped to tails when the player has moved his marker to clear a path for another player. Heads up means the ball was located where it was marked. Tails up is a warning to the player that he must relocate his ball before hitting it. Hitting the ball from the wrong spot is against the rules and requires a penalty.

If you see a player use anything like the following, you're playing with a hack:











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  #32  
Old August 11th, 2006, 03:07 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 12,539
"The club must not be substantially different from the traditionally and customary form and make. The club must be composed of a shaft and a head. All parts must be fixed so that the club is one unit, and it must have no external attachments except as otherwise permitted by the Rules."


That's the decades-old general rule for golf club design. The appendix the rule states as follows:


(iv) There must be no external attachments.

This Rule does not allow the attachment of aiming bars or weights, or anything which could potentially have an effect on the performance of a club. In some circumstances, permanent additions to a putter head may be considered a permissible appendage and, as such, could conform to the Rules provided the head satisfies the “plain in shape” requirements under Appendix II, 4a (see Design of Clubs, Section 4a). However, such additions must not be temporary in nature, non-durable or easily removable.

Exceptions to the “external attachments” Rule include decals for identification and tape to protect the shaft from being scratched or worn. Two other notable exceptions to this Rule are (a) the permission to apply lead tape on the shaft or head (see also Design of Clubs, Section 1b and Decision 4-1/4 in “Decisions on the Rules of Golf”), and (b) the use of a suction cup at the end of the shaft of a putter to assist with retrieving the ball from the hole (something which has traditionally been permitted). This exception does not extend to permitting the attachment of tee-pegs at the butt-end of a grip or clip-on ball markers or pitch-mark repairers during the stroke (although some ball markers/pitch mark repairers that have been integrated into the grip, are permitted).

The inclusion of the phrase “except as otherwise permitted by the Rules” is necessary to allow, for example, material added to form a grip (see Design of Clubs, Section 3)."


[emphasis added]

So, if I read this correctly, the Kramski wire fingers integrated into the grip are conforming, as is the equally ugly rubber suction cup on the end of the putter.

This is not only the mark of a hack, but against the Rules:




The golfer who uses these is not only a Hacker, but a cheater as well.
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  #33  
Old September 8th, 2010, 06:16 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 12,539




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  #34  
Old September 9th, 2010, 01:08 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,192
Thanks for posting that, John.

The Fausti girls have still got it going on and it looks like they run a nice company. I particularly enjoyed those shots of the shop floor in the second video. The juxtaposition of hand fitting with files and the CNC machines didn't strike me as anachronistic at all, but rather a traditional company that's updated and adapted without selling out. I like it.
I was also digging that scalloped boxlock.

"FIDO"?
Seriously? Who ordered that?

Probably that Mike Yardley chump. He should have just let his shooting do the talking. "Pennyslvania phesant"? "Georgia quail"? Ninja, please. You were shooting poultry. Only those African pigeons and the rattlesnake were wild.
And the dog work sucked.
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