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  #751  
Old December 27th, 2012, 08:33 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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Join Date: Apr 2004
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MUHAHAHAHA!
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  #752  
Old January 9th, 2013, 09:48 AM
Mike_Rupp Mike_Rupp is offline
Mike Rupp
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Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Mercer Island, WA
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So lately I've been stuck in a pho rut. The stuff is damn good, but I needed something different for a change. While searching for something different, I found this place:

Untitled

It's a typical Chinatown dump. It has a clean, but spartan interior. There was a small handwritten sign stating that they don't take credit or debit cards, always a good sign.

The menu:

Untitled

Szechuan Beef Noodle with Soup:

Untitled

To me, the most important thing about any kind of noodle soup is the broth, followed closely by the noodles. The broth was spectacular. It was really rich and savory and had enough chili to make it hot without overpowering other flavors. The noodles are sort of like an udon noodle, but a little different. The bok choy was a weird addition, I thought, until I tasted it. The bitterness of the bok choy is a nice contrast to the rich broth.

This place will be a new addition to my restaurant rotation.
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  #753  
Old January 9th, 2013, 10:41 AM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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That looks tasty.
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  #754  
Old January 9th, 2013, 12:19 PM
Mike_Rupp Mike_Rupp is offline
Mike Rupp
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Location: Mercer Island, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris snell




Everybody is getting in on the action:

27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=9,0,47,0">
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  #755  
Old January 15th, 2013, 10:13 AM
pbtakacs pbtakacs is offline
peter takacs
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Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Maple Valley, WA
Posts: 127
Good call on the Szechuan Noodle Bowl! If you feel the need for bbq down the the ID try Kau Kau on King St. I love the roasted duck and bbq pork.

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  #756  
Old January 15th, 2013, 10:52 AM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Join Date: Sep 2003
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I hit Gumi last night with Sheki and found that Gumi is back to the individual wrap on the asparagus:


I'm glad Gumi went back.
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  #757  
Old January 15th, 2013, 12:25 PM
Mike_Rupp Mike_Rupp is offline
Mike Rupp
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Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Mercer Island, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pbtakacs
Good call on the Szechuan Noodle Bowl! If you feel the need for bbq down the the ID try Kau Kau on King St. I love the roasted duck and bbq pork.


Thanks for the heads up.
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  #758  
Old January 15th, 2013, 05:09 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Those birds on the right. Is that some kind of mystery roast chino chicken? I've never seen that before and it intrigues me.
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  #759  
Old January 16th, 2013, 04:33 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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I'm so overdue for Gumi.
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  #760  
Old January 25th, 2013, 08:19 AM
pbtakacs pbtakacs is offline
peter takacs
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Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Maple Valley, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
Those birds on the right. Is that some kind of mystery roast chino chicken? I've never seen that before and it intrigues me.


I think that is just their straight up whole roasted chicken, could be their Soy Sauce Chicken.
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  #761  
Old February 13th, 2013, 09:47 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Join Date: Sep 2003
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You know how most Mongoloid places have the long chopsticks like this?:


I hit a Mongoloid place tonight after shooting with a friend and the cook there uses a machete:


It was pretty awesome. You can't really see it in the pic because of the steam and smoke, but it was a real machete. It wasn't all peanut buttered out at the tip or anything. It was legit.
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  #762  
Old April 8th, 2013, 11:28 AM
Mike_Rupp Mike_Rupp is offline
Mike Rupp
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Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Mercer Island, WA
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5 Brothers Grocery and Sandwich Shop in Key West, FL:

Untitled

Untitled

The Cuban Mix Sandwich:

Untitled

It seems that whenever I take a trip, the meal that I remember most fondly is the cheapest. We had a bunch of damn good food in Key West over the week, but this is the one that I'll dream about. The Cuban Mix sandwich is ham, roast pork, salami, swiss cheese, dill pickles, lettuce, mustard and mayo on Cuban bread. It's put in a press to heat up and give a little crisp edge on the bread. Man this sandwich was divine. It's all about the bread. In the same way that Mexican food will never reach its potential unless the tortilla is handmade and done really well, the Cuban sandwich is totally dependent on fresh Cuban bread. Apparently, it's made with lard, which gives it a really light & airy texture.
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  #763  
Old April 22nd, 2013, 12:48 PM
pbtakacs pbtakacs is offline
peter takacs
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Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Maple Valley, WA
Posts: 127
Anyone watch Anthony Bourdain's new show on CNN and his visit to Korea town? Dumplings....



http://www.cnn.com/video/shows/antho...known/episode2
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  #764  
Old April 23rd, 2013, 06:07 AM
Mike_Rupp Mike_Rupp is offline
Mike Rupp
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Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Mercer Island, WA
Posts: 862
I remember watching a commercial with Bourdain pimping his new show. His point was that CNN would be able to get him into places that the Travel Channel couldn't. Then where does he go on one of his first shows? Los Angeles. I used to love watching his show, but I think he's jumped the shark.
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  #765  
Old April 23rd, 2013, 10:17 AM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,070
These are cool pics from VeloNews' "Food of the Classics" gallery.

Quote:
Gaufres, or Wafels, are one of the signature foods of the spring classics in Belgium, The Netherlands, and Northern France. Unlike airy American waffles, they are a dense confection with chunks of pearl sugar in the batter. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com


Quote:
A vendor in Harelbeke, Belgium, sells dried fish snacks to spectators after the E3 Harelbeke race start. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com


Quote:
The Ronde van Vlaanderen fell on Easter Sunday this year and all the Brugge, Belgium, bakeries were in full swing for both events. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com


Quote:
In the town square in Oudenaarde, Belgium, girlfriends toast glasses of Pernod, an anise liqueur, while waiting for the race to arrive. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com


Quote:
Just before the first cobbled secteur in Paris-Roubaix, fans gather around a makeshift tavern for white wine spritzers and mixed grill. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com


Quote:
A Paris-Roubaix tavern proprietor shows off a local speciality, fougasse, a kind of French focaccia baked with ripened cheese. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com


Quote:
Zdenek Stybar conquers his post-race thirst inside the velodrome at Roubaix, France. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com


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Pastis 51 is typical aperitif consumed by many a cycling fan in France and Belgium. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com


Quote:
Close to the summit and eventual finish on the Mur de Huy, a VIP savors hot, course-side burgers. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com


Quote:
In the warm glow of spring sun and strong ale, local fans relax along the parcours during Liège-Bastogne-Liège. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com


Quote:
A veritable mixed grill is a known lunch pitstop for the race caravan at the foot of the Côte de Saint-Roch. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com


Quote:
One of the many popular mystery meats available at Frituurs across the Belgian countryside. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com


Quote:
Frites and mayonnaise are the No. 1 snack of the classics. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com
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  #766  
Old April 23rd, 2013, 12:09 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
That was great.
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  #767  
Old April 24th, 2013, 07:03 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,070
Look at this asshole:


The beautiful thing about it is that it's boned out and when it's cooked it's going to be a rectangle? Really? Call me crazy, but I want my chicken wings to look like chicken wings.

Flavor profile? What exactly is a flavor profile? Is that like a beta expedition?

The presentation of those wings sucks too. They look like knife-and-fork wings for people who refuse to eat fried chicken, sandwiches, or pizza with their hands.

Here's the Gumi chicken wing center and left:


They look like chicken wings. They taste like chicken wings. The one on the right is chicken skin. Yes, just the skin. You know all of those assholes who don't eat chicken skin and buy skinless and boneless chicken breast at the market? Gumi buys up the unused skin and grills it up.

Also contrast the way that guy talks with the way the Gumi guys talk:

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  #768  
Old April 24th, 2013, 08:49 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
The memories were thick watching that Gumi video.

And finally reading a translation of the unity cheer kind of blew my mind.
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  #769  
Old April 26th, 2013, 08:02 AM
dchapman dchapman is offline
Daniel Chapman
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 1,117
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
Flavor profile? What exactly is a flavor profile? Is that like a beta expedition?

You hit the nail on the head. It's the new most over used word in novice cooking and drink mixing these days. Now everyone talks about their flavor profiles because calling it a recipe sounds so boring.
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  #770  
Old April 26th, 2013, 08:39 AM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,070
A flavor profile is a recipe?

LOL.
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  #771  
Old May 22nd, 2013, 02:18 PM
read read is offline
Read Kerlin
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 302
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
I love Lawry's. It's one of my favorite places to eat.

john,

you better close up for the morning of june 11th from 11 - 3pm Lawry's is offering up $1.25 prime rib to the first 1,000 guests in honor of their diamond jubilee.

where to chow down on prime rib for $1.25

Lawry's 75thAnniversary
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  #772  
Old May 23rd, 2013, 10:58 AM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,070
$1.25 is a smoking price, but I refuse to wait in line for food.

1,000 people are going to score though.
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  #773  
Old May 31st, 2013, 09:31 AM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,070
Food from the Giro.


Quote:
A common find on the streets of Napoli is cuppone, a cup of gelato. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com



Quote:
A typical morning scene: the pastry selection at a local bar on the time trial course in Ischia. The sfogliatelle is one of the most popular pastries in Italy. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com



Quote:
To keep with the local cuisine, Omega Pharma-Quick-Step soigneurs made piadina for lunch. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com



Quote:
Team breakfast at the Giro often features dishes of cooked pasta, rice, and potatoes to help sustain the long hours on the bike. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com



Quote:
The team hotel breakfast offers a selection of affettati or cured meats including prosciutto and various types of salame. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com



Quote:
In the Dolomiti it's easy to find a variety of Italian birra. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com



Quote:
Aperitivo time in Italy means Prosecco. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com



Quote:
The Giro and a birthday party give good reason to break out the big bottles. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com



Quote:
On top of the Galibier, fans keep warm in the cold mountain air with a Bota bag — or wineskin — filled with strong Spanish wine. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com



Quote:
Inside the hotel kitchens where BMC Racing and Omega Pharma-Quick Step stayed after stage 7, piles of pasta sit at the ready. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com



Quote:
For BMC Racing, chef Walter Grözinger makes a kind of homemade "power bar" — a dense, calorie-rich fruitcake loaded with dried fruits, nuts, and seeds. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com



Quote:
Garlic is a key ingredient for flavor as well as its natural immune system benefits. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com



Quote:
In the hotel dining room, Saxo-Tinkoff riders enjoy the spoils of one staffer's birthday cake, made that afternoon by team chef Hannah Grant. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com



Quote:
In the Vacansoleil-DCM kitchen, a savory supper is followed by two beautiful fruit tarts to keep the team happy. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com



Quote:
Sweet tooth: Riders can burn up to 7,000 calories during a typical Giro race day and have duly earned the right to get double desserts — fruit tart and homemade sorbet served up by Hans Demyttenaere. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | VeloNews.com
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  #774  
Old May 31st, 2013, 10:25 AM
Mike_Rupp Mike_Rupp is offline
Mike Rupp
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Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Mercer Island, WA
Posts: 862
Sfogliatelle and cannolis are my favorite Italian pastries. WHen I lived in the Chicagoland area, I used to be able to drive 30 minutes and get pastries that would rival anything in Italy. There's absolutely nada in Seattle. I've thought about buying the metal cannoli tubes so I could make my own, but I'd just get fatter.
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  #775  
Old July 20th, 2013, 06:38 PM
chris snell chris snell is offline
Christopher Snell
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Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
I tried to make North Shore Oahu garlic shrimp tonight.

It was delicious, really really tasty, but it wasn't the garlic shrimp as I remember. It was missing a little bit of the punch. Maybe I need to add a small amount of white wine, or maybe it was the garlic. I baked two heads in the toaster oven until they were creamy and then I mixed that with four cloves of fresh-chopped. I think I will skip the baking next time and go fresh-chopped all the way.

I will also use clarified butter instead of complete butter next time. I think I needed to get the butter just a little bit hotter to crisp the shrimp up a little more but I would burn full butter if I had heated it higher. I also need a gas stove to do it right. We're staying in a rental house for the summer and I'm stuck with this crappy electric stove.

The quest continues.

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