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  #1  
Old June 7th, 2010, 03:32 PM
ronward ronward is offline
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Digital Cameras

I figured you digi-pix maestros can offer some opinions on this.

I'm looking at Nikon digital SLRs and wonder if there is a model that would be appropriate for a relative novice to grow with?

Thanks
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  #2  
Old June 7th, 2010, 04:34 PM
parantaeyang parantaeyang is offline
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What is the reason for Nikon? Do you already have existing set of lenses?
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  #3  
Old June 7th, 2010, 08:45 PM
tonydesanto tonydesanto is offline
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The D90 would be a nice camera that you could grow into as you learn.

What type of photography are you interested in? The lenses are far more important, but the bodies will vary in features that may or may not matter depending on the type of photography you do.

For example, the type of auto-focus system would hardly matter for landscape photography as compared to sports or action photography.
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  #4  
Old June 7th, 2010, 09:03 PM
hochung hochung is offline
Ho Chung
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Stop looking at Nikon, start looking at Canon.

Because like Chris, I really like this:

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  #5  
Old June 7th, 2010, 09:54 PM
tonydesanto tonydesanto is offline
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24-70-nikonlenscoffeecup.jpg

or, so you could get one of these at some point:

AF-S Nikkor 300mm ED VR II.jpg
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  #6  
Old June 7th, 2010, 09:57 PM
hochung hochung is offline
Ho Chung
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oh shit! LOL
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  #7  
Old June 8th, 2010, 06:11 AM
ronward ronward is offline
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Why Nikon? Well, a friend is a distributor and can get substancial deal for me. I've got a Nikon N2000 SLR from college, and a Nikon F3 with big motor drive and flash and all that but I just don't want to go to 35mm film. But, I'm not married to any brand. I have a couple of Canon Sure-shots and a Nikon coolpix that is ok for simple stuff, outdoors, random picture taking.

However for school events for my kids, the zoom on either of point-and-shoot rigs I have just sucks. The lighting in the auditorium, the distance to the stage, all play against me and I end up with crappy pics.

Was hoping there is a digital SLR that I can use a decent zoom lense with to capture images at a distance.
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  #8  
Old June 8th, 2010, 06:50 AM
Mike_Rupp Mike_Rupp is offline
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Ron, most average photography needs will be handled perfectly fine by either a Canon or Nikon. It is usually when photographers are pushing the edge of certain needs that they will be pushed to a certain camera. There is a reason why at sporting events 90% of the photographers are using Canons.

I bought a Nikon D200 a while ago simply because I've had Nikons since my Dad bought a Nikon EM manual focus 35mm back in the 80s and gave it to me because he couldn't figure it out. The D200 can use all of the lenses that I bought over the years. Some of the Nikon DSLRs can use the older lenses and some can't. You'll have to do some digging if that matters to you.

Shooting at a distance isn't a big deal. Shooting at a moving subject at a distance is a big deal. I'm happy with the results of my camera shooting at a distance. Here is a pic I shot recently at a distance of about 40 or 50 feet with my 70-300.


That is an older film lens that works fine with the D200. I'd find a camera that you feel comfortable with and not give it too much thought. DSLRs are somewhat disposable since technology is changing at a rapid pace.
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  #9  
Old June 8th, 2010, 08:44 AM
ronward ronward is offline
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I have two sigma manual focus lenses (70mm-200mm, 17mm-50mm) and a Nikkor 180mm prime manual focus lense that all work with my manual focus N2000 beater and the F3. I assume these would work with a current Nikon DSLR, only manually.
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  #10  
Old June 8th, 2010, 09:06 AM
Mike_Rupp Mike_Rupp is offline
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Ron, I can't remember off hand how manual lenses work with all of the new DSLRs, but I believe that some cameras won't even meter with manual lenses. My d200 will meter with my manual lenses.

I wouldn't spend a lot of extra dough on a body just to use old manual lenses though. You'd probably be better off getting a smaller body with more money spent on lenses.
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  #11  
Old June 8th, 2010, 03:33 PM
jrose609 jrose609 is offline
Jason Rose
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Costco has a pretty nice deal on a D90 right now.

http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product...atchallpartial

Comes with :

Nikon D90 Digital SLR Camera Body
18-55mm VR Zoom-NIKKOR Lens
70-300mm VR Zoom-NIKKOR Lens
Versatile System Carrying Case
4GB SD Memory Card
Lithium-ion Rechargeable Battery
Quick Charger
Audio/Video Cable
USB Cable
Strap
PictureProject CD-Rom


$1349 online price. Probably a little cheaper at the warehouse.

If you have lenses already and didn't want the lenses that come with the camera package, there are always "want" ads on Craigslist for lenses.

I bought a D90 from Costco. My first DSLR. I am a complete noob at photography, but I'm learning a lot, and I love the camera.
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  #12  
Old June 8th, 2010, 11:07 PM
greghirst greghirst is offline
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I also looked at Costco for a DSLR for my wife for Mother's day and settled on the Nikon D5000. It had a similiar package of accessories and lenses to the D90 for $800 and something.

She likes it and I have used it a few times as well for pics of my daughters competing in volleyball and equestrian events.

Not bad.
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  #13  
Old June 8th, 2010, 11:13 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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I can imagine Mike snapping this pic and the thoughts racing through his head:

Quote:
That woman's neck is really long. That's some Burma shit right there. Quick, snap a pic. Sweet. Got it.
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  #14  
Old June 9th, 2010, 06:21 AM
Mike_Rupp Mike_Rupp is offline
Mike Rupp
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John, I hardly had any time to think at all, but what drew me to her was how delicate she looked underneath the umbrella. I was sitting at Shibuya Crossing, which is the most densely populated place I've ever seen. I had to spend a few minutes trying to dial in the settings on my camera and then I had to manually focus for each pic since there were so many things going on the lens would just keep focusing.

That place is a people watching paradise. Here are a few more for your viewing pleasure:


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  #15  
Old June 9th, 2010, 03:27 PM
IanKreidich IanKreidich is offline
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I would recommend a D300. Nikon has moved on to the D300s but you only gain video. Find a nice used D300. I don't like the plastic feel of the D90 or the Canon equivalent for that matter. Then get a 180mm 2.8 prime. That would be a good lens if you're looking to shoot far off in low light on a budget.

If you have the cash go full frame with a D700 or Canon 5D then you can buy a cheaper zoom lens because you won't need the fast glass for low light.
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  #16  
Old June 9th, 2010, 04:49 PM
parantaeyang parantaeyang is offline
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I like girls with umbrella.

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  #17  
Old June 9th, 2010, 10:08 PM
tonydesanto tonydesanto is offline
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Spend the money on the glass, not the body. Sure, the D90 isn't made of magnesium alloy and it isn't well sealed from the elements like the D100/200/300 or higher are. But, it's a good low-light performer with decent auto-focus and a decent frame rate.

The 180 f/2.8 prime is a sweet lens, also is the 70-200 f/2.8 VR.

You want a camera that a novice can grow into. The D90 will keep you busy for the next few years, then sell it and upgrade when you're ready. You'll get at least 1/2 your money back on the body. If you invest in quality lenses they'll not only hold their value, but they'll start paying you back on day one.

A used D200 would be a sweet buy and is overall a better camera, but the D90 has an edge in lower light from an image quality perspective.

As you can see, I'm advocating saving the money on the body (given that you stated that you're a novice looking to learn and grow with the camera) and spend it on the glass. If you have a good budget for this, then still spend it on the appropriate lenses, a flash, maybe a tripod, a few good books, and some classes.
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  #18  
Old June 10th, 2010, 07:12 AM
ronward ronward is offline
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Great advice. Thanks
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  #19  
Old June 22nd, 2010, 11:10 AM
sheki sheki is offline
David Shechter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IanKreidich
If you have the cash go full frame with a D700 or Canon 5D then you can buy a cheaper zoom lens because you won't need the fast glass for low light.

How does a larger sensor create more light?
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  #20  
Old June 25th, 2010, 04:31 PM
IanKreidich IanKreidich is offline
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Obviously a full frame sensor doesn't create more light. I never said that. It allows you to capture images in low light by cheating with a higher ISO. Ideally you have both fast glass and full frame. You already knew that so I'm not sure why you asked the question.

If you don't think full frame sensors have greatly changed shooting digital in low light then I don't know what to tell you.
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