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  #1  
Old May 6th, 2006, 11:34 PM
nprovo99
 
Posts: n/a
how effective is hilift jack winching???

is it easy to winch with a highlift jack? i am poor and cant afford a whole new bumper and winch but dont want to venture out unprotected!... thanks
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  #2  
Old May 7th, 2006, 10:54 AM
nprovo99
 
Posts: n/a
anybody,,, anyone???
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  #3  
Old May 7th, 2006, 04:02 PM
greghirst greghirst is offline
Greg Hirst
KI6CQL
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 2,289
I would only use my hilift for winching as a last resort. It's a very slow process and you need to do it correctly for safety.

Get proper recovery points, a snatch strap, and wheel with someone else (hopefully with a winch).

A class with Bill Burke would be money well spent. It would give you some knowledge that would minimize getting stuck and give you some knowledge for safely getting unstuck when you do.

Don't cheap out when you do buy a winch/bumper. You'll regret it.
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  #4  
Old May 7th, 2006, 08:26 PM
nprovo99
 
Posts: n/a
Im poor for now.. but will save up for a winch/bumper.. but i want to get a high lift before venturing into the backcountry.. is it even possible to lift a D2 with stock bumpers and door sils??? or do i need to invest in bumpers and sliders befor i can even put a HiLift to use?? any help would be great..... THANKS
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  #5  
Old May 8th, 2006, 12:33 AM
greghirst greghirst is offline
Greg Hirst
KI6CQL
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 2,289
I don't think a hilift is a necessity for traveling the backcountry. In fact, it is downright dangerous if you don't know how to use it properly.

Stay in your comfort level and wheel with someone else. IMHO your sills and stock bumpers are not suitable for hilift use. You are limited to lifting from your rear hitch and wheels (hilift makes special hook attachments allowing you lift from wheels). However, you may find your stock bottle jack to be more useful than you think. Just use a suitable base (like the plastic hilift base piece) with your bottle jack to safely spread the surface area for usage on dirt or sand, etc.

Get to know your truck's limits and your own by staying on trails that are within your limits. My guess is that you will find your stock vehicle is able to very well offroad depending on your driving skill and judgement. You can dramatically increase your learning curve and $ave damage costs and safety by taking a class from someone like Bill Burke at BB4WA.
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  #6  
Old May 8th, 2006, 07:27 AM
traveltoad traveltoad is offline
Aaron Shrier
KI6BCA
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: San Fernando Valley
Posts: 2,628
Quote:
Originally Posted by greghirst
I don't think a hilift is a necessity for traveling the backcountry. In fact, it is downright dangerous if you don't know how to use it properly.

You can dramatically increase your learning curve and $ave damage costs and safety by taking a class from someone like Bill Burke at BB4WA.

Agreed.

Tom Severin also offers classes in the SoCal area. www.4x4training.com
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  #7  
Old May 11th, 2006, 09:15 PM
LoneXhere LoneXhere is offline
Bobby Black
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Long Beach, CA
Posts: 30
While I agree that a hi-lift -- or most accessories like a winch, for that matter, but that's another subject -- when used improperly, can be very unsafe. That being said, going expedition-style into the backcountry can be unsafe. You have to plan ahead and learn these things. You have a great pool of resources here to do just that.

That being said, a hi-lift is a great tool to have and can be indespensible. The aforementioned bottle jack, while very useful and easy to pack, is useless if you're buried up to the frame in crap.

A hi-lift on a pair of strong, properly installed pair of sliders makes for a good recovery point, especially when you're first getting started off-roading. Aftermarket bumpers -- however awesome they are -- aren't always the best first step for many due to cost. If he gets a bumper and no winch or hi-lift, he's still stuck, but with a bitch'n looking bumper.

IMHO, go for sliders and a hi-lift. A shovel too. Digging out and stacking rocks goes a long way when you're stuck and costs very little. Get some good rubber too, so you minimize your odds of getting stuck. Then move on to a bumper and a winch.

Hope this helps.

BTW, a good tip I learned for jacking with a hi-lift next to your doors is to OPEN the door. The jack leans in toward the car body and can go right into it.
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  #8  
Old March 15th, 2007, 12:05 PM
01001010
 
Posts: n/a
A little late but,

I have winched with a Hi-Lift. The first time I did it, I had to improvise many things because I didnt have the right gear. Scary stuff. The best (and should be the ONLY) way to winch with a Hi-Lift is using a chain.

From what I've seen out on the field is that a Hand Winch - like those offered by ARB or a Tirfor - works better and safer than a HiLift.
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  #9  
Old May 16th, 2007, 05:17 PM
fang
 
Posts: n/a
Hi Lift winching

Good points, all. I recently took Bill Burke's mini-Basic and Advanced classes at Anza Borrego as I'm new to off-roading. I highly recommend his courses, or those of similar caliber. He demonstrated use of the Hi Lift for winching and other uses as well. Basically it's a great handy-dandy tool, but you must know how to use it and practice using it, otherwise it's useless and dangerous as mentioned previously.

That said, to enable use as a winch you also need additional equipment. Hi Lift sells a decent recovery kit, to which I've added a synthetic winch extension, extra straps, shackles, appropriately locking chain extensions and above all else - GLOVES! Also, I carry copies of the Hi Lift instructions in my truck as well as photographs of Bill Burke setting it all up to use as a reference.

Personally, when I go into the backcountry I hope to have whatever I might need in the event I, or a trail mate or a stranger, get caught in a situation. More importantly I'm fairly confident I can put the Hi Lift winch into practice and make a successful and safe recovery.
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