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  #1  
Old May 1st, 2007, 11:37 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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If you love Tintin, then you must be a fan of...

Lucky Luke!




Bruno?
Aaron?
You feel me on this one?

Can anyone else take care of Les Daltons with such aplomb?

For the uninitiated you can get the scoop from wiki.

I had no idea there have been live action Lucky Luke films. I doubt they would be much good, but it would still be fun to watch.

He's best in print, but he's still good on the small screen:


The live Terence Hill live action is lacking:


Oh well.
I'll stick to the comic books.

Last edited by JSQ : May 1st, 2007 at 11:40 AM.
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  #2  
Old May 1st, 2007, 02:20 PM
Bruno Bruno is offline
Bruno Tome
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Oh damn, that brings back memories.

Lucky Luke, faster than his own shadow.

Very cool.

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  #3  
Old May 1st, 2007, 09:59 PM
scrover scrover is offline
Steve Cooper
 
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TinTin takes me back to the mid 60s. Every Saturday morning my Mum used to take us to the public library in Cross Gates - it smelled of floor polish - and we would borrow the big hardback versions of Herge's Adventures of TinTin - Thompson and Thomson, Snowy, Hercules et al.

Didn't get Lucky Luke in the UK - as far as I recall.

The other series I do remember was Hannibal the elephant..good times - I was six
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  #4  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 05:17 AM
traveltoad traveltoad is offline
Aaron Shrier
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I have heard of Lucky Luke... but I have never read it.

To suppliment TinTin we used to read The Adventures of Astrix
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  #5  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 06:00 AM
scrover scrover is offline
Steve Cooper
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by traveltoad
I have heard of Lucky Luke... but I have never read it.

To suppliment TinTin we used to read The Adventures of Astrix


Yes, that was another series - Asterix the Gaul is the one I remember

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asterix_the_Gaul

Interesting that Wiki shows 1961 in French and not until 1969 in English - maybe I was reading the French version but I remember it being way before 1969
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  #6  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 08:00 AM
Bruno Bruno is offline
Bruno Tome
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Speaking of TinTin, does anybody remember Michel Vaillant ?

Michel was awesome.



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  #7  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 09:17 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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Before you read Tintin, Lucky Luke, Astrix or Michel Vaillant, surely you were entertained by Jean de Brunhoff's tales of a dapper young elephant king:




Among many great adventures chronicling the regent of "Celestville" my favorite was always:


So nice of Babar to bring Father Christmas to the children of the Land of Elephants. Flora, Pom, Alexander and even Zephir the monkey were delighted.

Here is the Wiki article on Babar. There's an interesting bit on the colonial justification which de Brunhoff may have incoporated into themes of Westernizing African civilizations.

Babar was also animated:

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  #8  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 10:01 AM
traveltoad traveltoad is offline
Aaron Shrier
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Ah yes... Babar.
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  #9  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 10:42 AM
Nadir_E
 
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With you on Tintin (had every one of the English language editions) and Babar, but not Luke or Michael Valiant - guess I led a deprived childhood! It was a thrill to see my kids devour (and sadly destroy) my Tintin collection. One daughter who took French in high-school even obtained copies in French (including at least one never translated into English so far as I know - Tintin in Congo).

fun memories,
-n
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  #10  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 11:03 AM
traveltoad traveltoad is offline
Aaron Shrier
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nadir_E
Tintin in Congo
-n

I found that this is available in english.

I thought that I had all the english Tintins available... but I have never seen it before.

I will order it up today.
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  #11  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 11:06 AM
traveltoad traveltoad is offline
Aaron Shrier
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I also found The Adventures of Tintin in the Land of the Soviets in english. I have not seen this before either. I don't know if I just missed them, or if more have been translated since I was a kid.
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  #12  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 11:25 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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These are a repost from another thread but...

Got Tintin?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg tintin1.JPG (93.6 KB, 16 views)
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  #13  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 11:26 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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Got Tintin in Arabic?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg tintin2.JPG (95.4 KB, 11 views)
File Type: jpg tintin3.jpg (97.1 KB, 8 views)
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  #14  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 11:36 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nadir_E
One daughter who took French in high-school even obtained copies in French (including at least one never translated into English so far as I know - Tintin in Congo).

Quote:
Originally Posted by traveltoad
I also found The Adventures of Tintin in the Land of the Soviets in english. I have not seen this before either. I don't know if I just missed them, or if more have been translated since I was a kid.

Those two titles are quite controversial.
From wiki:

"Criticisms of the series
The earliest stories in The Adventures of Tintin have been criticised for racist, violent, colonialist and even fascist leanings, including caricatured portrayals of non-Europeans. The Tintin series originated as a comic strip in the "Petit Vingtieme" journal. Whilst the Hergé Foundation has presented such criticism as naïveté,[29] and scholars of Hergé such as Harry Thompson have claimed "Hergé did what he was told by the Abbé Wallez",[29] Hergé himself felt that his background made it impossible to avoid prejudice: "I was fed the prejudices of the bourgeois society that surrounded me."[26]

In Tintin in the Land of the Soviets, the Bolsheviks were presented as the villains of the piece, with Hergé drawing on Moscow Unveiled, a work given to him by Wallez and authored by Joseph Douillet, the former Belgian consul in Russia. The work is highly critical of the Soviet regime, although Hergé contextualised this by noting that in Belgium, at the time a devout Catholic nation, "Anything Bolshevik was atheist".[26] In the story, Bolshevik leaders are shown as motivated only by personal greed. Tintin discovers, buried, the "hidden treasure of Lenin and Trotsky". Hergé later dismissed the failings of this first story as "a transgression of my youth".[29] But by 1999 some part of this presentation was being noted as far more reasonable, The Economist declaring: "In retrospect, however, the land of hunger and tyranny painted by Herge was uncannily accurate".[30]

Tintin in the Congo has been criticised as presenting the Africans as naïve and primitive. In the original work, Tintin is shown at a blackboard addressing a class of African children. "Mes chers amis," he says, "je vais vous parler aujourd'hui de votre patrie: La Belgique" ("My dear friends, I am going to talk to you today about your fatherland: Belgium"). Hergé redrew this in 1946 to a lesson in mathematics. Hergé later admitted the flaws in the original story, excusing it by noting: "I portrayed these Africans according to ... this purely paternalistic spirit of the time".[26] The perceived problems with this book were summarised by Sue Buswell in 1988[31] as being "all to do with rubbery lips and heaps of dead animals" although Thompson noted this quote may have been "taken out of context".[29] "Dead animals" refers to the fashion for big game hunting at the time of work's original publication. Drawing on André Maurois' Les Silences du colonel Bramble, Hergé presents Tintin as a big-game hunter, bagging 15 antelope as opposed to the one needed for the evening meal. However, concerns over the number of dead animals did lead the Scandinavian publishers of Tintin's adventures to request changes. A page which presented Tintin killing a rhinoceros by drilling a hole in the animal's back and inserting a stick of dynamite was deemed excessive, and Hergé substituted a page which saw the rhino accidentally discharge Tintin's rifle whilst the erstwhile hunter snoozed under a tree.[18]


Some of the early albums were altered by Hergé in subsequent editions, usually at the demand of publishers. For example, at the instigation of his American publishers, many of the black characters in Tintin in America were re-coloured to make their race white or ambiguous.[32] The Shooting Star album originally had an American villain with the Jewish surname of Mr. Blumenstein. This proved to be controversial, as the character looked very stereotypically Jewish. Blumenstein was changed to an American with a less ethnically specific name, Mr. Bohlwinkel, in later editions and subsequently to a South American of a fictional country - São Rico. Hergé later discovered that 'Bohlwinkel' was also a Jewish name.[23]

While Tintin has been criticised on many occasions for not being much of a reporter, given he is rarely seen filing copy, Harry Thompson advanced a rebuttal in his work Tintin: Hergé & His Creation. Thompson argues that the 1920s had seen a change in the role of reporting, with "adventurer-journalists, who created their own news and reported it from a very personal perspective" becoming very much the vogue of the day. Thompson asserts that Tintin was filing "news back in the shape of a cartoon strip."[29] Tom McCarthy has noted that Tintin in the Land of the Soviets is presented as being the copy of a real journalist, with the illustrations purportedly photographs, which he avers "would allow it to invoke notions of documentary rigour".[15] At the end of the serial publication of this first adventure an actor was hired to pretend to be Tintin, arriving back from the Soviet Union by train on 8 May 1930.[29]"
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  #15  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 11:41 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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holy smokes some of these are hard:

http://tintin.eugraph.com/
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  #16  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 11:45 AM
nosivad_bor nosivad_bor is offline
Rob Davison
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JSQ
Before you read Tintin, Lucky Luke, Astrix or Michel Vaillant, surely you were entertained by Jean de Brunhoff's tales of a dapper young elephant king:




Among many great adventures chronicling the regent of "Celestville" my favorite was always:



From Fletch:

Doc: That's an interesting name, Mr...?
Fletch: Babar.
Doc: Is that with one B or two?
Fletch: One. B-A-B-A-R.
Doc: That's two.
Fletch: Yeah, but not right next to each other, that's what I thought you meant.
Doc: Isn't there a children's book about an elephant named Babar.
Fletch: Ha, ha, ha. I wouldn't know. I don't have any.
Doc: No children?
Fletch: No elephant books.
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  #17  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 11:51 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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  #18  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 11:58 AM
traveltoad traveltoad is offline
Aaron Shrier
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nosivad_bor
From Fletch:

Doc: That's an interesting name, Mr...?
Fletch: Babar.
Doc: Is that with one B or two?
Fletch: One. B-A-B-A-R.
Doc: That's two.
Fletch: Yeah, but not right next to each other, that's what I thought you meant.
Doc: Isn't there a children's book about an elephant named Babar.
Fletch: Ha, ha, ha. I wouldn't know. I don't have any.
Doc: No children?
Fletch: No elephant books.

lol
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  #19  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 12:31 PM
parantaeyang parantaeyang is offline
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  #20  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 12:36 PM
traveltoad traveltoad is offline
Aaron Shrier
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Richie Rich is a poofter.
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  #21  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 12:37 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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Man, get that shit out of here.
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  #22  
Old May 2nd, 2007, 12:54 PM
parantaeyang parantaeyang is offline
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LOL When I first came to states as a teenager I used to get confused with Richie Rich and tin tin
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  #23  
Old May 22nd, 2007, 03:42 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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I'm cross posting this with the youtube thread because I think it should be catalogued here.

Another favorite eurotoon hero has to be Danger Mouse.




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  #24  
Old July 17th, 2007, 04:34 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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I just heard on NPR that Herge's Tintin in the Congo has been reprinted and is being sold at Border's.

Apparently there have already been complaints about the seriously racist portrayals in even the revised version and the book has been moved from the children's section that for graphic novels.

Here is the program.

I'm headed to Border's to pick up a copy while I can. This is the only Tintin I've never read so I'm excited for the chance.

EDIT: I'm not sure from the program if it's actually out in the US or not. It's been released in Britain, but I just read that I may have to wait till the fall to see it here in the US. Guess I'll have to call my local store.
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  #25  
Old July 17th, 2007, 06:39 PM
traveltoad traveltoad is offline
Aaron Shrier
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I can't stand it anymore... I am going to have all my Tintins sent out from the East Coast.
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