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  #1  
Old June 19th, 2007, 04:04 PM
Eric Siepmann
 
Posts: n/a
Good Golf Clubs for the beginner. . .

Just getting back on the course after a long absense.

Ho, and John in the "Interesting E-mail" thread turned me on to Mizuno MP 32's. I also like the MP-100s. Also considering Ben Hogan Apex's. Very similar look and quality to the Mizuno's. Ideally I'd like to get a good set that I can grow into. I really think I would be hindering my game if I get clubs with a huge sweet spot.

I just really am skeptical that these newer clubs designed for game improvement dilute the spirit of the game. I want to be able to use my clubs, not just hit them...I fear that by getting a set I would be doing myself a dis-service down the road.

EwS
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  #2  
Old June 19th, 2007, 04:54 PM
montanablur montanablur is offline
Sinuhe Xavier
yes
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Neither here, nor there...
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I made the mistake of buying a set of the Callaway Big Bertha Graphite's coming back to golf after a 5 year hiatus... I hit them great in the store, they were light and easy to hit. That lasted about 5 or 6 rounds, as my swing came back the graphite became unmanageable and whippy.
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  #3  
Old June 20th, 2007, 08:22 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,054
All of the irons you mentioned are solid choices, so I say get the irons you think look the best to you.

You mentioned game-improvement clubs' violating or at least diluting the spirit of the game. I think that so long as your clubs are conforming with USGA and R&A rules, you are within the spirit of the game. But if you look at your irons and feel like a chump, you're not going to play well. So get the irons that look the best to you.

My favorite irons of the ones you listed are the MP-32s.
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  #4  
Old June 20th, 2007, 10:42 AM
ca_surveyor
 
Posts: n/a
Eric,

Do you still have your old clubs? Is so, I would recommend reviving the swing first.

My irons are an older set of MacGregor Tourney PT2 FC4000's. I can still hack equally bad.
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  #5  
Old June 20th, 2007, 10:47 AM
Eric Siepmann
 
Posts: n/a
Got rid of the clubs a long time ago. I have a loaner set right now.

Working on the swing this weekend. 18 on Friday, 9 on Saturday, 9 on Sunday, and 9 on Monday. Hopefully. We'll see how I feel after Friday.

EwS
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  #6  
Old June 20th, 2007, 12:00 PM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
Ben Hogan's Apex irons look good, but they make a funny sound. I've looked at Hogan irons numerous times, but I've always found that they just don't feel solid.

I know I sound like a broken record about this, but whatever you get, make sure they fit you. You don't have to spend a whole lot of money to do this. Most people when they hear this get Pings, because Pings can be color coded to match you, etc. This is a bad move.

Any forged iron can be bent up to four degrees. Cast irons cannot -- maybe two, if you can even get someone to risk it. They snap.

It so important to be fit properly. Even in the beginning. Strike that, especially in the beginning. People blow this off all the time, but clubs that fit you properly result in less compensations in your swing. Golf is hard enough; get your lie angles right. Get the right length shaft, with the right stiffness.

Ill fitting clubs make you line up funny. They make you do weird maneuvers to get the sole of the club flat on the ground at impact. Everybody, even beginners, subconsciously realize that sole needs to be flat at impact; you don't want to have to compensate for poorly fitting clubs to make this happen. It just makes it too hard.

It's easy and inexpensive to get fit. Find a pro in your area who specializes in it -- a couple of calls should get you a few names. Don't let the guys in the store do it; let a pro do it.

Then, whatever brand you go with, you can order the clubs to your specs for no extra charge. It just takes a few weeks.

In the long run, you'll be glad you did it.
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  #7  
Old June 20th, 2007, 12:33 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Just look at those beautiful sticks. Feel the love.

The heads are a little on the large side, but they are such sweet sticks.
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  #8  
Old June 20th, 2007, 12:49 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Siepmann
I also like the MP-100s.


My bad. I was under the mistaken impression that MP-100s were cavities. They're not. I was just checking out the Mizuno site and found the MP-100s:




The MP-100 looks to be a specially badged MP-33:




I would never recommend a club like the MP-100 or MP-33 or MP-37 for a beginner. Golf is hard enough without being able to hit your 6-iron on down. Go with a cavity design with a larger head than a true blade. You might even consider getting rid of the long irons all together and replacing them with those hybrid woods. Then, if you get better, you can use the long irons.

You're making a huge mistake if your set looks like this when you're starting out:


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  #9  
Old June 20th, 2007, 01:08 PM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
I go back and forth on that point, John.

First instinct is to say that someone just starting out will have more fun and will get more accomplished with bigger clubs and hybrids. When I worked in the golf shop years ago, I told people that all the time.

But it's very hard to identify the sweet spot on those clubs. Sure, you don't really have to -- you just put the club on the ball and most of the time it will hit the sweet spot. The downside is that the player is not really learning how to feel the sweet spot, and therefore how to get the sweet spot to the ball squarely.

We've discussed in the past how swinging a blade encourages you to be more aware of what the club head is doing throughout the swing. And that light, oversized clubs reduce feel. Sacrificing the feel at impact is one thing; sacrificing being connected to the sweetspot throughout the swing is another.

When we were kids, we started with blades. That was the only option. I guess it was pretty hard, but maybe that's why we value the feel of a smaller, forged head.

I don't know what the answer is. I wouldn't want to recommend to someone just starting out that a MP-32 2 iron is the way to go -- that would torture the guy. Maybe the best thing to advise is a set of blades from 6-PW and the newfangled hybrids to make up the rest?

Basically, I think there is a value to learning to play with blades, and not just because of the feedback at impact -- the whole swing is based on feeling where the club head is. The long term effects on his game might outweigh the short term hiccups. At the same time, I know how hard it is to hit the long irons.

Hmmmm...
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  #10  
Old June 20th, 2007, 01:40 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
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Yeah, it's a difficult thing. Does one start out with hacker clubs and make the game somewhat bearable? Or does he start with player clubs and make the game nearly impossible?

I think the latter is the better approach for someone who will be serious about golf for many years to come. For example, when my nephew is old enough to start golfing, I'm sure my brother and I will be on him like a cheap suit to play with blades and player clubs. We naturally want him to mature into a solid and serious player.

But how many people are serious about golf to that kind of degree? The average golfer can't break 100 if he plays legit. The average golfer is a hack, because golf is so difficult and requires so much practice and learning. And there's nothing wrong with being a hack and just enjoying golf for light recreation.

I wonder how many average golfers have ever felt the sweet spot. I like that story about Hogan's saying he was fortunate to hit the sweet spot once a round. Here we have one of the best ball-strikers in history and he thought he felt the sweet spot about once per round. I think the average hacker thinks he hits the sweet spot a few times per round. It's pretty funny.

I like your idea about the 6-10 in blades. I think that's a very viable option. I'm surprised more people don't do it for their own sets.
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  #11  
Old June 20th, 2007, 01:54 PM
hochung hochung is offline
Ho Chung
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Rancho Palos Verdes, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
Yeah, it's a difficult thing. Does one start out with hacker clubs and make the game somewhat bearable? Or does he start with player clubs and make the game nearly impossible?

I don't think it matters. It's not like the "game-improving" clubs actually improve your game. I think it's more in the head. I mean, the thinking head, not the golf club head.
____________________
Ho Chung

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  #12  
Old June 20th, 2007, 05:27 PM
Eric Siepmann
 
Posts: n/a
Matt and John,

Thanks for your insight. I was at work today and asked for input from some colleagues that had at least five years of solid tee time under them.

One ridiculed me for even thinking about any blades. After 10 years, he is still playing a max improvement club. A ping 9 something. 10 years and the best he could manage is a large cavity design. He even has a respectable average of mid 70's. This was really alarming. I actually felt sorry for him. As he joked at my expense for asking for honest input, he assured me that he could feel the sweet spot and the stroke that produced it. I could only think how? The whole club is a sweet spot. Designed to erase.

He later went on to say "I can only dream of hitting blades one day in the future". How sad. His only aspiration is to continue on in his thinking that one can not play without technical assistance.

I think the worst disease that hackers breed is apathy. ZGolf is an after thought. An excsue to drink, escape family, act foolish or inappropriately. A hacker avoids challenging himself, but craves the rewards that skill and long hard work bring.

The dark side seems to be so persuasive. The staff accountant who just started golf for the first time last year is convinced that blades are a thing of the past and a bad, no very bad idea. Players clubs are for the "studs of the course". Just buy into the hype.

I am now convinced that blades are the way to go. I was able to score a set of 4 year old Titleists from a friend with Rifle shafts, a Cleveland driver, stand bag and a crap putter for 75 dollars. I will get my swing back with old cheap perfromance enhancing crap. I think you need assistance when starting out and that perfromance enhancement is appropriate. I think if everyone was forced to earn skill and reward, that the wave of hackers would wane as the apathetic move to another diversion that offers quick reward and some modicum of status.

This weekend I am going to enjoy the free money Golfsmith is offering. No payments or interest till March 2008. I am going to buy the MP 32's. I will look into the MP 67's as well. Might be a better choice as the 67's have more forgiveness. I'll see what speaks to me...

I want to suck bad with blades. How can you learn with no feel and feedback on the course? How do you know if you have a slice or fade if all your shots are stright by club design. The long term is where it's at. Skill is earned, not bought, not designed.

I got wood for those Mizuno's so bad I am actually going to get a credit card after being free from consumer credit for over 3 years...

EwS
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  #13  
Old June 20th, 2007, 05:27 PM
Eric Siepmann
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by hochung
I don't think it matters. It's not like the "game-improving" clubs actually improve your game. I think it's more in the head. I mean, the thinking head, not the golf club head.

Amen Ho. Amen.
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  #14  
Old June 20th, 2007, 05:34 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Siepmann
He later went on to say "I can only dream of hitting blades one day in the future". How sad. His only aspiration is to continue on in his thinking that one can not play without technical assistance.


How sad? The guy shoots in the mid-70s and you're feeling sorry for him? I think you have it backwards.
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  #15  
Old June 20th, 2007, 05:59 PM
dannydisco dannydisco is offline
Daniel Long
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 76
Doesn't matter what clubs a player uses, if he's hitting GIR then he's golden.

Playing HS golf all the underclassmen would come in bragging about their big name new clubs (Orlimar Tri-Metals and Great Big Berthas at the time). Best golfer on the team (eventually played for U.F. I believe) played a set of Ping Eye 2's. Even though they were big "hacker" cavity backs he could bend the ball at will and regularly averaged below par on a month's play (we played from the tips at typically "wet" S.W. FL courses)

These are the same types of players that ran out and paid ~$450 for Liquid Metal drivers after I started hitting one well. I had won it in the city's junior golf tourney that summer. Naturally it was the club that made the ball travel, nevermind how the club to the ball in the first place.

After leaving for college I left behind $2.50 rounds (and $55/year range memberships) at the city course and sadly played very little through college. My bag hasn't left it's spot in the corner since February '06.

It might still have balata's in it.......
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  #16  
Old June 21st, 2007, 09:16 AM
Eric Siepmann
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
How sad? The guy shoots in the mid-70s and you're feeling sorry for him? I think you have it backwards.

I don't know. We're going to play next weekend. He self admittedly is a much better driver that doesn't do so well with irons. He also told me at lunch that his swing comes and goes. So it appears to me that he is getting a good deal of benefit from the clubs. He's a big boy that can drive and has a decent putting game.
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  #17  
Old June 23rd, 2007, 08:29 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,054
Eric,

Sorry for the late reply. It was busy here.

When we spoke on the phone, you asked me for a bottom-line recommendation for a nice set of clubs. I'm going to list only currently available clubs that are still in production. With some caveats, here is my recommendation.

For the driver, I like the Titleist 905R:

http://www.titleist.com/golfclubs/drivers/905R.asp

All of the 460 drivers with trampoline faces are very similar in performance. I like the 905R because it has a classic pear shape and isn't tremendously hook faced like the vast majority of today's drivers. It sets up nice and square. The 905R also has a pleasant sound to it, without any of the cheap-sounding hollow or metallic sounds that I dislike on woods. For the shaft I would probably recommend the Fujikura Speeder, which is probably the most common shaft on the 905R anyway.

Get fitted for the driver. If you can, get fitted on the Titleist Launch monitor. If you ignore the advice to get fitted, I would recommend 11.5 degrees of loft and a regular flex shaft.

For the "spoon" I recommend the Titleist PT 906F2:

http://www.titleist.com/golfclubs/fairways/906F2.asp

I recommend the 18-degree loft. Do not get the 13- and 15-degree lofts. You will not be able to hit them. The 18-degree is basically a 4-wood.

You will have a 12-degree driver and an 18-degree 4-wood. These woods look like player clubs, but are still usable by the average golfer.

For irons, I recommend the Mizuno MP-32:

http://www.mizunousa.com/equipment.n...golf&cat=irons

These are cavities with slightly oversized heads, but they are very pleasant to look at. They have relatively thin toplines and considerably less offset at the hosel than the usual cavities.

These irons are also forged, while the vast majority of cavities are cast. The forged head material is very soft and gives a softer feel than cavities cast from rock-hard stainless steel. The head material is isoft enough heads will suffer countless dents over time. Many people who do not understand dislike the dents. If you can't stand the dents, don't get forged clubs.

Get fitted. If you ignore the fitting recommendation, I would recommend standard lie/loft and Dynamic Gold R300 flex steel shafts.

Your iron set will be 3-PW, so you will have the ability to carry three different wedges. I would recommend the Vokey 200s:

http://www.titleist.com/golfclubs/we...y200series.asp

The Vokeys are available in both chrome and oil can finishes. I highly recommend the oil can finish. The oil can is a cosmetic brown finish that is NOT corrosion resistant. Your wedges will rust over time. As with the dents in the soft irons, the rust on these wedges is a desirable thing. But if you cannot stand having rusty wedges, don't get the oil can finish.

The Vokeys are available in a dizzying array of different loft and bounce angles. I'm going to recommend the 252.08, 256.10, and 260.04 models. This gives you three different lofts and bounce angles at your disposal. It's a very usable set of wedges. In the beginning the various lofts and bounce angles will be irrelevant to you. But as you get better, the different angles will become meaningful to you.

That leaves the putter for the 14th club. The putter is the hardest club to recommend because it's basically just personal preference. All golf clubs are personal preference, but the putter is moreso than the rest. I'm going to recommend a Scotty:

http://www.titleist.com/golfclubs/pu...arcoalmist.asp

I like the No. 3. There are other Scotty putters I like much more than the Circa 62 series, but they are now discontinued and hard to locate.

For the bag, I recommend the PING Hoofer Vantage:

http://www.pinggolf.com/bags_hoofervantage.html

The Vantage has a lot of black pieces on it, so the only color I would recommend is the all-black bag. The two-tone bags are too garish in my opinion. For headcovers just use the covers your driver and spoon came with. I can't stand it when golfers don't cover their woods and treat them like irons. Don't get a cart bag. Get a carry bag and walk. If you must cart to enjoy golf, don't golf.

That's a very nice set of clubs. I chose these clubs for you because I get the feeling you want some player clubs and grow into them. The clubs I chose aren't really any harder to hit than the game-improvement clubs, but they LOOK like player clubs.

Some caveats:

(1) This set is expensive. Nice shit costs money. You mentioned interest-free financing at Golfsmith. Do you really want to go into debt to buy some damn golf clubs? Forget that. If you can't pay cash for your clubs with disposable income, don't buy them.

(2) You're not going to play any better with these clubs than with some used/beater set. Golf is 99.999% player, so this set isn't going to make you a better player. They're just nice clubs that you enjoy owning and using.

(3) You might look like a chump with these clubs. They might be too bad ass for you. Though they are not any harder to hit than game-improvement clubs, they look like player clubs. If you show up with these sticks and you can't break 100, you could look like a chump or wannabe or whatever. I always love watching good players with beater clubs. You could end up being the polar opposite of that.
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  #18  
Old June 24th, 2007, 03:22 PM
Eric Siepmann
 
Posts: n/a
John,

Cool. I am worried about being a chump. I love free money offers like the Golfsmith interest free extended payment. I have the cash but can delay the expenditure for quite some time. I actually had to get an Amex for work. Haven't had a credit card for three years. Just got the mortgage, Amex (issued to me/employer) and the last remnants of my student loan.

I found a real good local shop and am going to get fitted by the Mizuno Rep on July 6th. I'll have to find a shop with the Titleist equipment.

By chance I picked up the hoofer at Golfsmith today. Not going back there except for balls. Staff sucked.

I am going to look into lessons so I can get a good foundation - grip, posture and swing. I hit 101 today on a very tight public course. Not very challenging, but I definetly want to get consistently in the low 90's before getting the irons. I have a 6:00 Tee Time tomorrow and will see what happens. At this stage I will be happy with good course management and as many GIR as I can get.

I'll pick up the wedges next week. Driver is going to have to wait till I can get some consistency. Nothing says equipment junky like having choice but not being able to fully use it.


Question: Should I stay with the stock shafts and grips? I belive Mizuno has a custom program or it might be the shop sponsoring the event.

Thanks for taking the time to think about this. Soooo Many choices out there.

EwS
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  #19  
Old June 25th, 2007, 01:26 PM
hanchung hanchung is offline
wsixhan
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: South Pasadena, CA
Posts: 1,182
all this talk about golf... so where's a good pro shop in los angeles?
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  #20  
Old June 25th, 2007, 01:48 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,054
Han, I recommend Koreatown for the golf shops. Most of the American shops carry cheap shit clubs. The Korean shops carry the nice stuff and for cheap too. It's sort of like the watch stores. If you go to Ben Bridge looking for a Sub you're likely to walk out empty-handed. If you go to Saint Cross, you can walk out with five Subs and for cheaper too.

Take cash.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Siepmann
At this stage I will be happy with good course management and as many GIR as I can get.


GIR are great, but not as important as actual scoring. As the old saying goes, "it's now how; it's how many". If you're hitting lots of greens that is great, but it's not as important as scoring well.

In fact, I prefer to get up and down for par over hitting the green and two-putting. If I were to hit all 18 greens in reg and shoot par, I would feel ripped off. But if I were to hit only 9 greens in reg and shoot par, I would feel as if I really played well.

Also, keep in mind that golf is a game of misses. No matter how good you are and how much you practice, you cannot hit every green. It's humanly impossible. Accept the misses and make the best of it with a solid short game.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Siepmann
Driver is going to have to wait till I can get some consistency. Nothing says equipment junky like having choice but not being able to fully use it.


Actually, I recommend getting the driver now. You probably hit your driver 14 times during a round. How many other clubs do you hit 14 times per round? The driver is the second most important club in the bag.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Siepmann
Question: Should I stay with the stock shafts and grips? I belive Mizuno has a custom program or it might be the shop sponsoring the event.


We'll see what your fitter says, but I recommend steel shafts for your irons. By "steel", I mean Dynamic Golds. Shaft flex will be up to your fitter but I would guess that you're a regular flex kinda guy. Don't get stiff just for the sake of getting stiff.

Grips are up to you. The two main types are ribbed or round. I prefer round, but as a beginner I'm guessing you would be better off with ribbed.

There is an endless variety of different grips out there. You will find your favorites over time. Learn to re-grip your clubs yourself. That way, regripping will be cheap and easy for you, and you'll be less likely to play with old/worn/slippery grips on your clubs. You will also be able to experiment with different grips and see which ones you like.
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  #21  
Old June 25th, 2007, 02:14 PM
hanchung hanchung is offline
wsixhan
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: South Pasadena, CA
Posts: 1,182
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
Han, I recommend Koreatown for the golf shops. Most of the American shops carry cheap shit clubs. The Korean shops carry the nice stuff and for cheap too. It's sort of like the watch stores. If you go to Ben Bridge looking for a Sub you're likely to walk out empty-handed. If you go to Saint Cross, you can walk out with five Subs and for cheaper too.

Take cash.




i'm gonna check out the mizuno's. what do you guys think about the MP-67's?
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  #22  
Old June 25th, 2007, 02:15 PM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
As far as getting some help goes, there is a lot of misinformation and hack teachers out there. Many of the big name teachers are hacks as well. The golf swing is a complicated process, and there are many ways to do it correctly.

Be very careful when choosing an instructor. There are guys out there who genuinely believe they know what they are doing. They will think they are helping you, while they are actually creating numerous problems that you'll one day have to fix.

Your driver and your putter are your most important clubs. As John said, you'll hit those more than any of the others. And if you're good with those, you will score well and have a lot of fun. The wedges are close behind the driver and putter in importance. Learn to master those, and you'll be a good golfer.

Learn to putt before all else. Everyone wants to start beating balls, but the art of putting trumps all else. Like they say, the putter is the great equalizer. Learn to get the ball in the hole. After all, that's the point of the whole game, right?

Everyone putts differently, but there are certain truths in putting:

1) Speed is first. You can't plan for the break unless you know how hard you plan to hit the putt.

2) Your stroke must be accelerating at impact. If you decelerate the putterhead into the ball, all sorts of things can go wrong. Accelerating doesn't mean that the head has to moving fast; it just has to be accelerating. This goes for chipping and pitching as well -- deceleration leads to disaster. Control distance with the length of your backswing. Keep the head accelerating through impact.


Something like 64% of all shots during the average round are played from within 30 yards of the green. So where should the bulk of you practice time be? Chipping, pitching, and putting. Learn the feel of that, and the full swing is just an extension of that feel.

Learn to have a flat left wrist at impact -- never let it bend. This is where consistency lies. If you wear a watch on your left hand, put a ruler or a pencil under the face of your watch running along your forearm and on top of your hand. Now chip a few balls -- the ruler should prevent your left wrist from bending. Instead, the whole forearm rolls over. Watch the PGA tour players on TV. Record them and watch in slow motion. All of them have drastically different swings, but the one thing they all have in common is a flat left wrist (except for Retief Goosen -- he lets his left wrist break down).

You can make a lot of mistakes in your golf swing, but a flat left wrist can save you.

Sorry if I'm giving unsolicited advice -- I never do so on the course. But you seemed to be asking, so I'm getting into it a little.

Good luck with it.
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  #23  
Old June 25th, 2007, 02:30 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,054
Quote:
Originally Posted by hanchung
i'm gonna check out the mizuno's. what do you guys think about the MP-67's?


I hate them. They seem to be designed for the player who is on the fence about playing blades. Mizuno put that little cavity into the muscleback to give the illusion of forgiveness. But that cavity is merely a vestige of a real cavity. I doubt it does anything. If you're going to play blades, play some real blades. Or play a real cavity.

Also, the MP-67s are degenerate clubs. That "CUT MUSCLE" engraving on the muscleback is cheesy looking. I also can't stand that degenerate Mizuno symbol. It looks like something Nike would have on its clubs. Barf.

Now the MP-37s on the other hand:




What sweetness. The MP-37 is basically a blend of the MP-14 and MP-29. The head size and offset are that of the MP-14 and the little flared tip of the muscleback is from the MP-29. These are bitchin irons.

MP-14. MP-29. MP-33. All of these are equally nice as well.
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  #24  
Old June 26th, 2007, 08:04 AM
craigc
 
Posts: n/a
Now those are beautiful clubs. Best purchase I made, really love my MP-37's and would recommend them to any serious golfer! Not too many shops carry them - but they can still order them for you.

I also recommend Roger Dunn's they offer a 90 day customer satisfaction exchange service, buy some clubs, play with them for 90 days and bring them back (for any reason) - they give you the exact amount you paid as store credit to try out a different set... I had a lot of fun with this, tried everything from callaway, cleveland, titleist to taylormade- until John pointed me in the right direction -MIZUNO.
Started with the MP-60 - these too are great sticks - set up nice at address, a little oversized but not bad... I couldn't get over the
two-tone satin finish of the insert - why?

MP-37's - highly recommend them!!
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  #25  
Old June 26th, 2007, 08:30 AM
hanchung hanchung is offline
wsixhan
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: South Pasadena, CA
Posts: 1,182
man, you guys are killing me!

last night i couldn't find my apex blades. it's been 10 years+ so i don't remember what i did w/ them. but i found the old ping set. it was 9 pm and the range is 5 minutes away from my house. i went thru a large bucket... i was surprised i could still hit the ball. well... i guess w/ the ping any hack can hit a ball... LOL. then went on the putting green, i was 2 putting most holes... so i guess the putting touch is still there.

anyways, was fun and refreshing to get out and hit a bucket. i'm sore now.
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