Expedition Exchange Bulletin Boards  

Go Back   Expedition Exchange Bulletin Boards > General
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #51  
Old July 2nd, 2007, 09:56 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,068
21 over at Brookside 2? And you haven't played in 10 years?

Man, I'm calling bullshit. Did you play legit? Or did you play Korean Golf?
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old July 2nd, 2007, 10:03 AM
hanchung hanchung is offline
wsixhan
W6HAN
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: South Pasadena, CA
Posts: 1,182
did i say i was going to play brookside? i played a short par 70 course in alhambra. yes, haven't played for 10 year. last week, went to hit balls at the range every day. that's it. when did they change the rules on the metal spikes? cuz i dont' have my old shoes and never put the soft spikes ever in my shoes either. i had to go get me new shoes. so it's gotta be about 10 years.

and i did play legit w/ legit MP-37's and legit titleist proV1.

Last edited by hanchung : July 2nd, 2007 at 10:07 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old July 2nd, 2007, 10:06 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,068
I just guessed Brookside Two.

Did you play Almanzar?
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old July 2nd, 2007, 10:10 AM
hanchung hanchung is offline
wsixhan
W6HAN
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: South Pasadena, CA
Posts: 1,182
yes, almansor. very clean public course, i was surprised.
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old July 2nd, 2007, 11:26 AM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
For shoes, check out the new Adidas line. I recently had to buy a new pair of shoes and wanted to try something new. I'm very happy with them. They feature great support, great traction, and they're very comfortable.

They are light years better than the lower end FootJoy shoes. Now, the FootJoy Classics are awesome, but they are very heavy and cost over $250. They are great looking shoes. But for years I went with looks over comfort, not realizing what I was giving up.

Especially when walking, a comfortable pair of shoes can make you very happy. The new Adidas offerings are the shit. The Nike stuff is crapola, and most of it is hideous to look at.

If you're not getting FootJoy Classics with the wooden sole, Adidas is the way to go, imo.
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old July 2nd, 2007, 11:52 AM
hanchung hanchung is offline
wsixhan
W6HAN
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: South Pasadena, CA
Posts: 1,182
i concur w/ you matt... i got the adidas last week. very comfortable.
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old July 2nd, 2007, 12:16 PM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
Or did you play Korean Golf?

By the way, what's "Korean Golf?"
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old July 2nd, 2007, 01:47 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,068
Korean Golf is not playing legit.

For shoes, my favorite are still the FootJoy Classics like these:







I'm not even sure if these are made any longer. I haven't seen all-leather golf shoes in quite a while.
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old July 2nd, 2007, 02:16 PM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
Korean Golf is not playing legit.


Ah. I thought it might be a specific style of cheating or something.

The worst is when guys are "practicing" while playing a round. They hit a poor shot, then drop another ball really fast to hit from the same spot in an attempt to erase the bad shot from their consciousness. Those guys don't improve very quickly -- you have to own your bad shots to improve. Practice is practice; playing is not practice. Play the game and score your round. Get the ball in the hole any way you can. Evaluate afterwards. I'm trying to break that habit in one of my friends who is relatively new to the game, but he won't listen.

They still make FootJoys like that.
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old July 3rd, 2007, 09:25 AM
hanchung hanchung is offline
wsixhan
W6HAN
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: South Pasadena, CA
Posts: 1,182
so the mizuno fitting specialist will be at the golfsmith in pasadena later this month. i'm thinking of taking the MP37's there... what do you guys think? or should i just do it at the pro shop. anyone has any experience w/ the pro shop at the brookside GC at the rose bowl?

thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #61  
Old July 3rd, 2007, 09:34 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,068
I say just stick to standard lie/loft, at least until your swing settles down.

Fitting golf clubs can be tricky. If you're accustomed to using standard lie/loft, then you will probably test out for standard lie/loft when you get fitted, because your swing naturally changed to suit the standard lie/loft on your clubs.

It takes a very experienced eye to tell if you need something different than standard lie/loft.
Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old July 3rd, 2007, 10:38 AM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
I hate to disagree with you John -- it can be very painful. But here goes...

I used to think that a player can adjust to his lie angle. To some extent, that's true, but it's not necessarily a good thing to do. When I bought new irons about three years ago, I decided I wanted to get fitted by a guy who really knows his shit. I figured why not go see what the guy said; what did I have to lose?

So I went to the guy around here with the best reputation. He's a pro who trains all the pros in the Gulf States section in regards to clubfitting. He's been doing it for 20+ years.

I was scared that I would get a bad fitting. I change the way I swing from time to time -- sometimes my hands are lower at address and impact, sometimes they are higher. I don't do this from shot to shot, but sometimes over long periods of time I'll gradually change. I was worried that my lie angles would need to be changed based on how I was currently swinging.

I expressed my concern to him, and he politely laughed at me. He said that a player can't change what his proper lie angle should be. When he fit me, he fit me based on his years of experience and knowing where my hands should be at impact and address.

I see people swinging with compensations to make up for ill fitting clubs. People inherently know that to be effective, the club can't come into the ball toe-deep or heel-deep. If a guy is short or tall, or if he has long arms or short arms, this can cause many goofy looking moves to occur withing the stroke. It causes more complications than are necessary.

If a player knows that the club head must impact the ball and the ground with the right attitude, then a good fitting pro should be able to look at the player and determine a proper lie angle.

This is an angle that will allow the player to swing the most comfortably, with the fewest compensations. Sure, a short guy with long arms could learn to hit clubs that are 4 degrees up, but why? Why not get a qualified pro to make it easier on you?

It's like you said -- equipment is one of the few things you can control. Why not control it? Where's the loss in getting fitted properly? A few bucks? A few hours?

All my reservations, which were exactly what yours seem to be, disappeared when I got fitted by a guy who really knew his shit. The game is more fun now. I swing from a better posture and it feels freer. My fitting revealed that I need shafts 3/4 of a inch longer and a lie angle of 1* up. I don't stoop over anymore; there is less stress on my back. I don't pull short irons and wedges from being too bent over anymore. It's all stuff I didn't even realize I was doing.

Now, going to a pro shop and having a guy put some tape on the bottom of a five iron and seeing where the tape is most scuffed up, then extrapolating this metric to the entire set isn't what I'm talking about. Fitting needs to be done by somebody who knows what he is doing. It has to be someone with a general knowledge of the golf swing. It's not rocket science or anything, but there are a lot of hacks out there.

Anyway, I think there isn't much to lose by being properly fitted. For years I was indifferent and somewhat skeptical, thinking that I could conform to whatever clubs I was playing. It wasn't until after I was properly fitted that I realized how much of a difference a good fitting makes.

Anyway, this is my humble, dissenting opinion.
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old July 3rd, 2007, 10:48 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,068
Matt, I think you and I agree more than disagree.


Quote:
Originally Posted by matttaylor
Now, going to a pro shop and having a guy put some tape on the bottom of a five iron and seeing where the tape is most scuffed up, then extrapolating this metric to the entire set isn't what I'm talking about. Fitting needs to be done by somebody who knows what he is doing. It has to be someone with a general knowledge of the golf swing. It's not rocket science or anything, but there are a lot of hacks out there.


That is what I was talking about. Most of these traveling fitters do just that. They tape up a club and then have you hit off a hard board a few times to scuff up the tape.

I'm not sure what the probative value of this procedure is. It might show a glaringly ill-fitting club, like a standard club being hit by a little kid.

But, as you and I have said, it takes a very experienced eye to fit clubs properly. It can't be done by formula, like the way PING does it for its color charts.
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old July 3rd, 2007, 01:22 PM
Eric Siepmann
 
Posts: n/a
I bought the adidas several weeks ago. Great Shoe. I wish they made a more traditional style though...

EwS
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old July 3rd, 2007, 01:26 PM
Eric Siepmann
 
Posts: n/a
Han,

I'll post up what the Mizuno fitting was like in a few days. I have a feeling they are trying to sell a custom program like that listed in their sales literature. Customize club models to your game.

I'll get fitted and see if I can shave some cash from the 32's at the shop. He seems to work with people more often than not.

EwS
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old July 20th, 2009, 09:20 AM
tonydesanto tonydesanto is offline
Tony DeSanto
Gen
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Greater Denver Area
Posts: 252
A great weekend of golf

I'm resurrecting a great thread, instead of starting a new one. This seemed like the best place for it.

First off, I don't play much anymore. I grew up playing, but have taken on other interests in the last 11 years. I have averaged less than 1 round of golf per year in the last 5 years.

So, a friend invites a few of us out to a course I hadn't heard of before. Not surprising, as I haven't been paying attention to golf in a long time. We've had it on our calendars for about 5 weeks now; that's how it is when most of your friends have kids and busy schedules anymore. So, I knew this was a links-style course, but didn't even put much thought into the fact that we would be playing on the same weekend as the British Open. Now, after having played this course and having spent the better part of yesterday cheering on Tom Watson, I've come to realize how perfect the timing was.

The course is called simply, "The Tribute." You can read more about it here. This link includes descriptions of each hole, including which one it attempts to replicate.

The Tribute.jpg

This is similar in concept to Tour 18, in that it is comprised of famous holes. This one, though, is a collection of famous holes from courses around Scottland. Of course, Muirfield, St. Andrews, Turnberry, Royal Troon, and others are represented here. In fact, the 1st and 18 holes are side by side one another, just like at St. Andrews.

Sure, it's not as cool as setting up a golf tour around Scottland and playing the actual courses. That would be the pinnacle; however, it was fun to experience a replica of some of golf's most famouse holes. It was great to discover this right in my own backyard. When we started, I didn't know I'd be playing a replica of one of the holes in yesterday's playoff between Watson and Cink, or that I'd birdie the 18th at St. Andrews, or reach the 9th green at Muirfield in two. I didn't play very well (15 over), but it was fun nonetheless. They kept the rough similar to what you'd experience over there. You don't want to get near it. If you do, and you're lucky enough to actually find your ball (very unlikely), you'd be hard pressed to advance it much at all towards the hole. Expect about 20-30 yards. The bunkers were just like you see on television: deep, pot bunkers. I'm lucky that I only got in one of these all day, and I'm even more lucky that it was a large fairway bunker, and that I had a decent lie. Even so, I was only able to advance it about 80 yards and it cost me a stroke.

So, the tee times were packed, and we had a group pressing us all day long. Therefore, I didn't really have a chance to get more than just a few photos. I don't have them with me at the moment, so I'll try to post them up soon.

It was a fun way to get back into the game. In adding to tradition, I took my cavity back, square grooved clubs and left them at the house. I loaded up my Arnold Palmer Original Standard grinds, my old Taylor Made metal woods, and my blade putter. This added to the experience and brought back a lot of great memories. I really miss the feedback that the blades provide. There really isn't anything like it, especially when you're trying to work the ball inside 150 yards.

More to come...
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old July 20th, 2009, 10:30 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,068
That sounds like a lot of fun. There's a course like that in Vegas as well. I've never played there, but my brother and I always wanted to play there just to check it out on one of our Vegas runs. Vegas is perfect for this type of course.

You birdied the 18th at St. Andrews? That's sweet. You probably drove into the Valley of Sin and then chipped close to the hole? Then tapped in for birdie? Hehe.

Did you quadruple-bogey the Road Hole? Let me guess. Your tee shot rested on the road? And then you went legit and hit your approach from the road, and then your shot trickled into the Road Hole Bunker? And then you took several shots to get out, and when you finally did the was resting very close to the wall? And so you had to bounce the chip against the wall? Aaah, that would be fun.

And I'm guessing your tee shot on the Postage Stamp landed right by the hole and you tapped in for birdie?
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old July 20th, 2009, 02:17 PM
tonydesanto tonydesanto is offline
Tony DeSanto
Gen
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Greater Denver Area
Posts: 252
For postage stamp, I wish I had birdied it. It was actually pretty uneventful. Very little wind (we were playing early in the morning) and a green that was still slightly wet. So, it was only a sand wedge to the back of the green and a two putt.

The road hole was a funny experience. I wish weíd had more time to study the holes we were playing. We were rushed by the group behind us quite a bit, and I didnít realize that we were supposed to hit over the shed. The yardage book they gave us didnít actually describe that piece of the puzzle, and from the tee you canít tell where youíre supposed to aim. Unless youíve played there before or remembered what 17 at St. Andrews looks like, you cannot see the fairway or the green from the tee. The tee box is actually lined up towards the first bunker in the picture on the website. So standing there at the tee, I figured it just played left to right and I aimed out past the bunker playing it safe with a three wood. Luckily I hit it rather straight and didnít get into too much trouble on what turned out to be the left rough. I ended up in the short stuff and was able to get a decent shot down by the left side of the green (pulled it a bit), pitched up, and two-putted for a bogey.

As for the 18th, I was concerned about going OB on the right, so I simply hit a 3 iron off the tee and I think it only required a pitching wedge to the green. The green is probably reachable, but for me I was just trying to keep it in play.
Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old July 21st, 2009, 08:36 PM
Muskyman
 
Posts: n/a
this is funny

I read this thread a couple years ago and enjoyed it, seeing it come back up made for a nice re-read.

I just went out and hit about 100 wedges tonight, kinda funny how I dont ever really think about replacing clubs anymore

I havent played much in the last two seasons, the economic slow down hit my house hard so golf kinda went to the back burner for awhile. I played once this year so far, went out in 45 back in 34 man this game will drive you crazy!!

Thom
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old July 23rd, 2009, 05:54 AM
dchapman dchapman is offline
Daniel Chapman
KJ4BXR
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 1,117
It's been 2-years since this post. What would you change, John?


Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
Eric,

Sorry for the late reply. It was busy here.

When we spoke on the phone, you asked me for a bottom-line recommendation for a nice set of clubs. I'm going to list only currently available clubs that are still in production. With some caveats, here is my recommendation.

For the driver, I like the Titleist 905R:

http://www.titleist.com/golfclubs/drivers/905R.asp

All of the 460 drivers with trampoline faces are very similar in performance. I like the 905R because it has a classic pear shape and isn't tremendously hook faced like the vast majority of today's drivers. It sets up nice and square. The 905R also has a pleasant sound to it, without any of the cheap-sounding hollow or metallic sounds that I dislike on woods. For the shaft I would probably recommend the Fujikura Speeder, which is probably the most common shaft on the 905R anyway.

Get fitted for the driver. If you can, get fitted on the Titleist Launch monitor. If you ignore the advice to get fitted, I would recommend 11.5 degrees of loft and a regular flex shaft.

For the "spoon" I recommend the Titleist PT 906F2:

http://www.titleist.com/golfclubs/fairways/906F2.asp

I recommend the 18-degree loft. Do not get the 13- and 15-degree lofts. You will not be able to hit them. The 18-degree is basically a 4-wood.

You will have a 12-degree driver and an 18-degree 4-wood. These woods look like player clubs, but are still usable by the average golfer.

For irons, I recommend the Mizuno MP-32:

http://www.mizunousa.com/equipment.n...golf&cat=irons

These are cavities with slightly oversized heads, but they are very pleasant to look at. They have relatively thin toplines and considerably less offset at the hosel than the usual cavities.

These irons are also forged, while the vast majority of cavities are cast. The forged head material is very soft and gives a softer feel than cavities cast from rock-hard stainless steel. The head material is isoft enough heads will suffer countless dents over time. Many people who do not understand dislike the dents. If you can't stand the dents, don't get forged clubs.

Get fitted. If you ignore the fitting recommendation, I would recommend standard lie/loft and Dynamic Gold R300 flex steel shafts.

Your iron set will be 3-PW, so you will have the ability to carry three different wedges. I would recommend the Vokey 200s:

http://www.titleist.com/golfclubs/we...y200series.asp

The Vokeys are available in both chrome and oil can finishes. I highly recommend the oil can finish. The oil can is a cosmetic brown finish that is NOT corrosion resistant. Your wedges will rust over time. As with the dents in the soft irons, the rust on these wedges is a desirable thing. But if you cannot stand having rusty wedges, don't get the oil can finish.

The Vokeys are available in a dizzying array of different loft and bounce angles. I'm going to recommend the 252.08, 256.10, and 260.04 models. This gives you three different lofts and bounce angles at your disposal. It's a very usable set of wedges. In the beginning the various lofts and bounce angles will be irrelevant to you. But as you get better, the different angles will become meaningful to you.

That leaves the putter for the 14th club. The putter is the hardest club to recommend because it's basically just personal preference. All golf clubs are personal preference, but the putter is moreso than the rest. I'm going to recommend a Scotty:

http://www.titleist.com/golfclubs/pu...arcoalmist.asp

I like the No. 3. There are other Scotty putters I like much more than the Circa 62 series, but they are now discontinued and hard to locate.

For the bag, I recommend the PING Hoofer Vantage:

http://www.pinggolf.com/bags_hoofervantage.html

The Vantage has a lot of black pieces on it, so the only color I would recommend is the all-black bag. The two-tone bags are too garish in my opinion. For headcovers just use the covers your driver and spoon came with. I can't stand it when golfers don't cover their woods and treat them like irons. Don't get a cart bag. Get a carry bag and walk. If you must cart to enjoy golf, don't golf.

That's a very nice set of clubs. I chose these clubs for you because I get the feeling you want some player clubs and grow into them. The clubs I chose aren't really any harder to hit than the game-improvement clubs, but they LOOK like player clubs.

Some caveats:

(1) This set is expensive. Nice shit costs money. You mentioned interest-free financing at Golfsmith. Do you really want to go into debt to buy some damn golf clubs? Forget that. If you can't pay cash for your clubs with disposable income, don't buy them.

(2) You're not going to play any better with these clubs than with some used/beater set. Golf is 99.999% player, so this set isn't going to make you a better player. They're just nice clubs that you enjoy owning and using.

(3) You might look like a chump with these clubs. They might be too bad ass for you. Though they are not any harder to hit than game-improvement clubs, they look like player clubs. If you show up with these sticks and you can't break 100, you could look like a chump or wannabe or whatever. I always love watching good players with beater clubs. You could end up being the polar opposite of that.
Reply With Quote
  #71  
Old July 23rd, 2009, 08:49 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,068
Several of the clubs I listed there are now discontinued or superseded by what I believe are better alternatives.

My favorite driver is still the Titleist 905R:


The 905R has a beautiful pear shape and a nice sound. I also like the gunmetal color of the paint and dislike black-colored drivers.

Titleist replaced the 905R with the 907 and later the 909. I'm sure these are fine clubs, but I prefer the 905R because of the less degenerate markings on the sole:


The 905R doesn't have interchangeable or movable weights like many of the current drivers. That's a good thing. If you're slicing the ball, fix your swing. Don't try to fix your sling by moving a weight. That approach will never work.

The 906F2 spoon is also discontinued. That's a pity because this was a wonderful spoon:


Just look at that beautiful pear shape. The 906F2's head was a low-profile design with minimal crown:


The sole was largely flat and featureless:


And the sole has a slightly dig profile:


The face is perfectly square:


Look carefully at most woods today and you will see that they are hook-faced to suit hackers who slice.

For irons, I still like the idea of the Mizuno MP-32:



These are wonderful irons. They're cavities but they're not some huge hacker clubs. Rather, they're beautiful clubs:


For wedges, the Vokeys are no longer even a consideration in my mind. For me, the one and only choice in wedges is the Mizuno MP-T:


These new Mizuno wedges blow away anything else on the planet. At least I think so.

The MP-Ts have the so-called C-grind sole:


Just look at that beautiful teardrop head shape:


These MP-T wedges rock. Look at that beautiful hosel with no offset. There's actually a slight onset on this lob wedge, with the radiused leading edge of the sole protruding slightly. Just epic.

For putters, I would recommend a Seemore:


I think this is a great putter. It's very easy to align. And I dig the funky look. These perimeter-weighted putters are for chumps.

Such a set would look very similar to this:


For the bag, I still like the PING Hoofers:


Try to get one in a single color. The latest Hoofers with multi-colored panels and colored piping look a little garish to my conservative eyes.

Please don't fall into the trap of carting while you play golf. Carts are for chumps. They're the offroad trailers of the golf world. Don't do it. Walk when you play.

The same caveats I gave to Eric still apply to you:

Quote:
(1) This set is expensive. Nice shit costs money. You mentioned interest-free financing at Golfsmith. Do you really want to go into debt to buy some damn golf clubs? Forget that. If you can't pay cash for your clubs with disposable income, don't buy them.

(2) You're not going to play any better with these clubs than with some used/beater set. Golf is 99.999% player, so this set isn't going to make you a better player. They're just nice clubs that you enjoy owning and using.

(3) You might look like a chump with these clubs. They might be too bad ass for you. Though they are not any harder to hit than game-improvement clubs, they look like player clubs. If you show up with these sticks and you can't break 100, you could look like a chump or wannabe or whatever. I always love watching good players with beater clubs. You could end up being the polar opposite of that.

I'll add one more caveat:

(4) Golf clubs are not like guns. You can be a lousy shooter and you won't screw up your guns by being a lousy shooter. You can screw up your woods by being a lousy golfer. It would suck to put sky marks all over your 905R or 906F2. This doesn't mean you're a chump. Golf is difficult. Even with practice every day, golf is a very difficult game. It's very easy to put sky marks all over your woods.

In an ideal world, the sweet spot on your driver would be worn out and there wouldn't be a single sky mark on the crown:


And any drag marks on the sole would be perpendicular to the clubface:


Same for your spoon:


Once you reach this level of nirvana on your woods, don't let anyone else hit them. I let others hit my irons, wedges, and putters, and I let all kinds of people shoot all of my guns, and I let all kinds of people drive my Defender on the trail, but I don't let others hit my woods. Even a reasonable person exercising reasonable care can easily screw up your woods.
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old July 23rd, 2009, 09:48 AM
Muskyman
 
Posts: n/a
6.5* 975D man John you musta been swinging with some crazy club head speed when you were baging that one.

That musta been before launch monitors and launch angle became the end all of club tuning.

Well from your list I guess I feel good about my Ping Hoofer bag

Other then that my rusty cleveland wedges, dented up blades and simple Kevin Burns putter just look like old junk compared to that pretty set.
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old July 23rd, 2009, 04:09 PM
dchapman dchapman is offline
Daniel Chapman
KJ4BXR
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 1,117
John, What wedges are in the bag? Looks like:
60-05
58-10
53-08
and what's that other one? Not the PW, but there is one more I can't see.

Think there is a lot of difference in hitting the 60-05 and the 60-08?

I was looking at the 905T. But I did a lot of reading today and the general consensus is that the 905R is a bit more forgiving due to its larger size. Folks claim the 905R gives a higher launch, too.

I know I'm reading way too much into this shit and I should just go out and hit some fucking balls.......
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old July 23rd, 2009, 04:39 PM
Muskyman
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchapman
John, What wedges are in the bag? Looks like:
60-05
58-10
53-08
and what's that other one? Not the PW, but there is one more I can't see.

Think there is a lot of difference in hitting the 60-05 and the 60-08?

I was looking at the 905T. But I did a lot of reading today and the general consensus is that the 905R is a bit more forgiving due to its larger size. Folks claim the 905R gives a higher launch, too.

I know I'm reading way too much into this shit and I should just go out and hit some fucking balls.......

Dan

the amount of bounce is going to have alot to do with the types of conditions you play in. My 56 has 14* of bounce in it and that works great for the the waupaca sand that the midwest is known for. When the sand is wet I have to pull my 60 with 3* because the 56 would produce alot of skulled shots because the big flange will bounce off the hard wet sand.

Here in the midwest the conditions differ alot between the private clubs and public tracks so you really need to think about what conditions you will face the most.

For example my putter has a brass insert, it works well for the greens I play that are rolling around a 9-10. I have a buddy that is a member at Medina and when I play there everybody is sporting a polymer insert putters because the greens are rolling between 12-14 on most days.

As far as drivers go I find the bigger the head the harder it is to work the ball. My natural shot is a draw, and what I have found is that with alot of the big drivers I cant just open my stance and rip a big fade when I need one so I tend to prefer a smaller head.

Ok maybe I need to go out back and hit some wedges
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old July 23rd, 2009, 05:54 PM
hochung hochung is offline
Ho Chung
W6HC
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Rancho Palos Verdes, CA
Posts: 2,006
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchapman
I was looking at the 905T. But I did a lot of reading today and the general consensus is that the 905R is a bit more forgiving due to its larger size. Folks claim the 905R gives a higher launch, too.


They are both hard to hit.
____________________
Ho Chung

Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Good Korean Movie - Tae Guk Gi Nadir_E General 8 February 19th, 2006 02:38 AM
Good TV This Weekend johnlee General 34 February 7th, 2005 10:01 AM
talk about good eats... david General 1 December 22nd, 2004 07:10 PM
PCQ-Now the good stuff-LOT's of pics traveltoad General 11 July 28th, 2004 09:00 AM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 10:21 PM.




Copyright © 2001-2012 Expedition Exchange Incorporated. All rights reserved.
Powered by vBulletin Version 3.5.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.