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  #26  
Old August 4th, 2007, 08:54 PM
reelpain
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally posted by dchapman "I've been hunting since I was 4 years old".

Really?? 4 years old and you could hold a long gun and hunt?...Damn you must have been a "heffa" of a kid. Just because one pays a premium doesn't suggest that they cannot retire at 45. The bile that flows from your mouth is so pretentious. Do you not read the EE bbs...Its nothing but BETTER high end merchandise..So please do us all a favor and get off your cheap ass pedestal!! Your an ignoramus!
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  #27  
Old August 4th, 2007, 09:18 PM
dchapman dchapman is offline
Daniel Chapman
KJ4BXR
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 1,117
Quote:
Originally Posted by reelpain
Really?? 4 years old and you could hold a long gun and hunt?...Damn you must have been a "heffa" of a kid. Just because one pays a premium doesn't suggest that they cannot retire at 45. The bile that flows from your mouth is so pretentious. Do you not read the EE bbs...Its nothing but BETTER high end merchandise..So please do us all a favor and get off your cheap ass pedestal!! Your an ignoramus!


Yep, had a .22 mini bolt action. It was made by Ranger, which I think was owned by Winchester. It would shoot both .22 shorts and longs. Takes a real gorilla to handle such a weapon.

And everything on the EE BBS is "better"? LOL. Ok. I'd really like to hear you explain this one...
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  #28  
Old August 4th, 2007, 09:53 PM
Mike_Rupp Mike_Rupp is offline
Mike Rupp
WZ7V
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Mercer Island, WA
Posts: 862
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchapman
Oh, now I can't afford "finer things"? Here we go.... I bet the tires and wheels on my truck cost more than the value of your truck...

I don't have to justify anything. I grew up poor, yet now I have a coffee table that cost more than my fathers first home. It has nothing to do with money. What it HAS to do with is the people who are so overly consumed by name brands and price. To a point I would agree thet you get what you pay for; and in a lot of cases that is true. But not here.

It's like the hunt I will be joining in September; thats a $5,000.00 hunt for one day. Will I kill more Geese because I paid so much? Will I see more Doves? Will I have a better time? Hardly. I would much rather be stomping around out there with Jack and could really care less if I even saw the first bird.

You want to have your cake and eat it too. How weak. You love to be the poor pathetic country bumpkin, but then write about how much you spend on wheels and tires?

Then to top it off, you are spending $5000 to hunt geese? Holy shitballs, Batman! For the price of airfare, you could limit day after day in Illinois on geese.
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  #29  
Old August 4th, 2007, 10:09 PM
dchapman dchapman is offline
Daniel Chapman
KJ4BXR
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 1,117
Did not mean to mis-lead; but no, I did not pay the $5,000.00 fee to hunt. Collin Hulla is a personal friend and does not charge me to hunt the property. I took him on a few hunts and fishing trips while he was in college and away from home......pay backs are a bitch.

It's not my type of hunt, at all. But, I'm sure it will be an experience. Gives me an excuse to scout for deer if noting else.
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  #30  
Old August 5th, 2007, 07:07 AM
ronward ronward is online now
KI4WWU
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Columbus, GA
Posts: 738
Jack, I just ordered my second pair of Russell's PH boot for my Mexico trip in September. You'll love these for their light weight construction and super confortable moccassin construction. You really can wear these barefooted if you wanted to, no blisters at all.

And thanks for the link to the LLBean lightweight field shirts. I've got the Orvis Marquesas shirts in the olive and khaki colors (as well as the white and blue for fishing) and maybe an officer's field shirt in some kind of heavy cotton duck.

I hunt opening day (dove) usually in short pants and my PH's and it's still "hawt as bawls" as some might say.

Cheers!

-Ron
____________________
Ron Ward
1990 Range Rover Classic
& a couple nice watches

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  #31  
Old August 5th, 2007, 10:47 AM
greghirst greghirst is offline
Greg Hirst
KI6CQL
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 2,287
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchapman
Haha, are you one of the guys who purchased their Land Rover due to the names "Land Rover"? You sucker!

Actually, I started driving and appreciating Land Rovers in a series IIa in Utah back in the summer of 1976. I was lucky enough to drive a 2-door Range Rover across fields and tracks near Tring, Hertfordshire when visiting relatives in England in 1979. I bought my current and first Range Rover in September, 1992. I bought it to offroad with and have been ever since.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dchapman
Land Rover is a piece of shit, prove me wrong! Since what, 1983??? Land Rover has been dead in the USA. With he exception to the Defender for a few years, the Land Rover name has not stood what what it did with the Series vehicles. Land Rover build up their name with these vehicles then destroyed it with the Range Rover and then the Discovery.

You're a moron, Dan. For someone as post-happy as you are, I'm surprised you know so little.

Land Rover left the US market ~1974 and burned some bridges when they did. Their crappy support and service for series Land Rovers killed sales and the Land Rover name. When they left they basically gave away the rights to the Land Rover name. It was pretty worthless.

They had to rebuild a reputation when they returned in 1987 under the name Range Rover North America. Due solely to the Range Rover, sales and demand boomed. This allowed them to bring over the Defender and lower-market Discovery in '94.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dchapman
As for why I purchased a Land Rover, the story is buried in Dweb somewhere. Basically, I was looking for a 4wd SUV' I like the Jeep Cherokee and the Discovery. Then, I met Bill Montgomery at a job I was working at who in return introduced me to Kertis Hussy who has a dealers license. He was able to find me a Discovery for a fraction of what the used car dealerships wanted for them, so that what I ended up with. At the time, it was the blind leading the blind; had nothing to do with the Land Rover name. The I met people like Mike Noe and James Gall who got me hooked on lifting, rigging, and wheeling the truck. I would have been much better suited with a car and kept my Toyota "buggy" for the crawling.

Well, that explains it. You're one of those "bargain-hunters" who simply stumbled in Land Rover ownership. Due to the fact that there's alot of 10+ year old Rovers out there, anyone with $2k can pick up a D1 or RRC and beat and butcher it.

For someone who claims to resent "name brands" you seem to do more mentioning of brands and more name-dropping than just about anyone else.

You seem to have some sort of inferiority complex. In your case, maybe it's justified.
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  #32  
Old August 5th, 2007, 05:06 PM
dannydisco dannydisco is offline
Daniel Long
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 76
(Getting back on topic)

Mr. Quinlan/anyone with experience,

The Russell's posted are seemingly great shoes from your experiences, and I have some questions. First, have you worn the boots through any snow? Second, how do they hold up against the cold? Background here is that I move to South Dakota in a couple of weeks for work and will be using the oppurtunity to take in some great hunting.

My "problem" is that I'm looking for a boot that will work in snowy fields for the upland (grouse, partrige, pheasant) hunts as well as Black Hills big game (elk, mule deer, white tail). I'm beginning to think I'll be stuck with two different dedicated boots. One heavily insulated bird boot, and a less insulated hiking style boot for the hills.

The need for insulation in the bird boot comes from the late-September to January bird seasons (average highs in the 30's & 40's with snow during the height of the seasons) vs the big game seasons in the milder Sept-Nov time-frame (average highs in the 60's-40's).

Mr. Quinlan's photos show that he's had little problem in rough vertical terrain with his boots, as one would expect from a custom fit boot, so Black Hills' terrain isn't an issue. The cold is a concern however, especially considering my Florida residency of the past 11 years.

I apologize for the long winded round of "questions", but I'm attempting to learn as much as possible about upland hunting before moving as I'll have just earned military residency in time for the season openers, leaving not much time to learn on location.

Thanks all for all the information....

D. Long

Last edited by dannydisco : August 5th, 2007 at 05:11 PM. Reason: Little slow
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  #33  
Old August 5th, 2007, 06:28 PM
JMH JMH is offline
Jonathan Hanson
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Tucson, more or less.
Posts: 274
Daniel, my only experience with Russells is their warm-weather stuff. If you go to their website:

http://www.russellmoccasin.com/index.html

. . . you'll find several models made for cold/wet weather use. There may be one there that will do it all for you. I think the Air-Bob sole is a little soft for sharp rocky terrain; I prefer good old Vibram Montagna as in their Mountain Climber. Not sure if you can get those insulated, but Russell will do almost any modification you want.
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  #34  
Old August 5th, 2007, 06:43 PM
dchapman dchapman is offline
Daniel Chapman
KJ4BXR
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 1,117
Quote:
Originally Posted by greghirst


Well, that explains it. You're one of those "bargain-hunters" .


It took you to this post to figure that out?
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  #35  
Old August 6th, 2007, 10:28 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMH
The tropical-weight (4.5-ounce) shirts from these guys:

http://www.long-grass.com/safarishirts.htm#

. . . might be worth a look.


I checked out the shirt from Long Grass and I like the basic design but I don't like loose weave fabric. I have owned loose weave shirts and I think they get caught on the brush too easily. The loose weave is open and thorns and branches get hooked in it, in my experience. They are a very light weight. Filson also makes some very light weight tropical shirts, the feathercloth series. I bought one of these for my Father and he likes it but actually prefers linen.


These shirts are very very light, but I'm not really looking for the most ultra thin variant imaginable. I just don't believe it will hold up over time, even if it's Filson. What I am looking for is a basic concept that is lighter and cooler regardless of the make, that being the safari shirt: poplin or other thin close weave cotton and short sleeve.
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  #36  
Old August 6th, 2007, 10:36 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSQ
I'm also going to ditch the McAlister waxed cotton faced pants for the early season in favor of a single ply pant. It needs to be thicker and heavier than khakis or the brush will pierce it easily but it should be lighter and thinner than the upland pants I wear for brush busting. Those have served me well, but they are hot! (the full waxed we wear for duck can get really roasty when it warms up)


LL Bean also makes the Katahdin Iron Works Pant. These or the Katahdin Iron Works Khaki should be tough enough for the dove field and far cooler than the waxed-face McAlister pants.

KI Khaki:

KI Pant:

I was looking at my LL Bean catalog at home and noticed that the Katahdin Iron Works "pant" has a Carhartt-style utility pocket on the side.
That's a deal breaker for me. I hate that shit. The side pocket is so useless. It not big and functional like a cargo and it lacks buttons or a zipper to close it. Anything that might fit in there, like a leatherman or other multi tool, will easily slide out when you're sitting on the ground. Basically the pocket is there to make you look like some sort of ready-for-business handyman. Lame.

I prefer the pants have no "extra" pockets at all. While a cargo pocket can be useful other times I really don't think it works out bird hunting. Put anything large in there and it will bash your knees. Plus the pockets stick out and get hung up when you are pushing through the bushes. No good.

I'm going to go with the KI "khaki". It's more plain and hopefully will still be tough enough for a little brush wading.
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  #37  
Old August 6th, 2007, 10:38 AM
ronward ronward is online now
KI4WWU
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Columbus, GA
Posts: 738
Jack my local Filson dealer here carries the featherweight cloth shirts and I have a couple. They are terrific shirts and the weave is very tight. You'd have to repeatedly wash them pioneer style to get any real wear on the fabric they use.
____________________
Ron Ward
1990 Range Rover Classic
& a couple nice watches

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  #38  
Old August 6th, 2007, 10:46 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannydisco
(Getting back on topic)

Mr. Quinlan/anyone with experience,

The Russell's posted are seemingly great shoes from your experiences, and I have some questions. First, have you worn the boots through any snow? Second, how do they hold up against the cold? Background here is that I move to South Dakota in a couple of weeks for work and will be using the oppurtunity to take in some great hunting.

I have not worn my Russell TLCs in any snow.
I have walked through streams in them and they are completely waterproof. The tongue is gussetted and I treat the boots with the Obenauf's LP that Russell sells.


Here is a write-up on leather care from Russell's website.

The coldest weather I've experienced in these boots is about 30 degrees F. I was fine. The TLCs are not actually designed as a bird hunting boot. They are more of a high country sheep and stag boot so I imagine they would be well suited to cold temp. When I decided to take the plunge and get the custom Russells I called up to talk to them about the various offerings. Ralph advised me that because I hunt in rocky steep terrain I should get a mountain boot rather than the birdshooters that are designed for fields or rolling plains. You might also want to call up and talk with Ralph about your needs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dannydisco
My "problem" is that I'm looking for a boot that will work in snowy fields for the upland (grouse, partrige, pheasant) hunts as well as Black Hills big game (elk, mule deer, white tail). I'm beginning to think I'll be stuck with two different dedicated boots. One heavily insulated bird boot, and a less insulated hiking style boot for the hills.

The need for insulation in the bird boot comes from the late-September to January bird seasons (average highs in the 30's & 40's with snow during the height of the seasons) vs the big game seasons in the milder Sept-Nov time-frame (average highs in the 60's-40's).

Mr. Quinlan's photos show that he's had little problem in rough vertical terrain with his boots, as one would expect from a custom fit boot, so Black Hills' terrain isn't an issue. The cold is a concern however, especially considering my Florida residency of the past 11 years.

I apologize for the long winded round of "questions", but I'm attempting to learn as much as possible about upland hunting before moving as I'll have just earned military residency in time for the season openers, leaving not much time to learn on location.

Thanks all for all the information....

D. Long

I don't think there's anything wrong with getting multiple pairs of boots. I don't think you want to end up like Emelda Marcos but if it's convenient for you to switch for different outings, get what suits your needs. If that means two pairs than so be it. Obviously I've decided to explore this option.

Call Ralph.
He'll give you the advice you need.
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  #39  
Old August 6th, 2007, 10:55 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
One more thing about boots and cold weather.

I think it's very hard to gauge how "warm" a boot is in extreme temps. Unless you are standing in a snow melt stream or standing in wet snow for a long time, the boots are not the major factor in how warm your feet feel.

You whole body needs to be kept warm. If you do not keep your head and torso warm your body will start to cut the work load and will focus only on heating the critical areas. The extremities are the first parts of your body to "feel" cold.

Many times people who aren't warmly dressed think their gloves or boots aren't providing the necessary insulation when in reality it's the loss of heat in their head or torso that is the problem.
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  #40  
Old August 6th, 2007, 11:10 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
I'm bummed.


I just got off the phone with Russell and the current wait is 16weeks.

Even expedting my order will only get me down to 6 weeks.



There are boots from cancelled orders on the sale list, but unfortunately those kind of defeat the purpose. My feet are pretty narrow and pretty flat. In fact, Russell has explained to me that when they make my boots they use a shoe last rather than a boot last. Furthermore my feet are two different lengths. Basically, I'm smart to buy from Russell, because I really am best served by a custom made boot. However, I am not smart to call three weeks before dove season to order those boots.

They said they would look through what they have and see if anything might be a good match.
If something is close, they'll send it out and I can try it on.
But odds are that solution isn't going to work for me.

This sucks.
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  #41  
Old August 6th, 2007, 11:31 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
Patty from Russell just called back.

They have no PHs that would fit me.

She offered me a pair of Art Carter Traveling Sportsman chukkas.


I guess these chukkas serve a purpose, but I don't think it's mine.
I passed.

I guess I'll just go ahead and order the Safari PHs built to order from my drawings that they have on file. I'll expedite the order. I won't have them for the first dove season (when it matters most) but I'll have them for the rest of the season and I'll have them for openers to come.

Still a bummer.
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  #42  
Old August 6th, 2007, 11:36 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by ronward
Jack, I just ordered my second pair of Russell's PH boot for my Mexico trip in September.

A second pair?
That's just greedy.
It's because of people like you that I have to wait so long and won't have my boots for the opener.

Thanks a lot.
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  #43  
Old August 6th, 2007, 01:01 PM
ronward ronward is online now
KI4WWU
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Columbus, GA
Posts: 738
Anytime.

Actually, I ordered my PH's off the shelf from Stafford's in Thomasville, GA. My feet are standard US issue men's size 11D, in everything from Orvis Gokey pull-on field boots to duck boots to Tretorns to Allen Edmunds. So blame your slow ordering skills and the other Russell fans for the wait time, not me!
____________________
Ron Ward
1990 Range Rover Classic
& a couple nice watches

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  #44  
Old August 6th, 2007, 02:39 PM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
Man, I dig some Allen Edmunds. I've been meaning to order a pair of black wingtips from them, but I haven't gotten around to it.

I've owned one pair of Allen Edmunds and loved them.

I'd like to get a pair of classic wingtips from them and just send them off every few years to get rebuilt.

They have some ghetto fabulous shoes in their catalogue, though. I stick with the classics.
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  #45  
Old August 6th, 2007, 07:48 PM
JMH JMH is offline
Jonathan Hanson
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Tucson, more or less.
Posts: 274
I go back and forth on loose weave versus tight weave in shirts. The loose weave is much cooler, but I think the poplin is more durable, and it does catch thorns less.

Shoes: I'd like to try a pair of these:

http://www.aldenshop.com/DrawOneShoe.asp?CategoryID=109
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  #46  
Old August 7th, 2007, 05:02 AM
Scott Brady Scott Brady is offline
Scott Brady
KE7PNP
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Prescott, AZ
Posts: 267
Jack,

Great picture of a Model 12 still in use. I have my grandfather's 12 and 16 bore.

While I have several modern shotguns, I still appreciate/prefer shooting the model 12. Just looking at the metal wear (from use) makes me smile, worn through the years by Bradys before me.

Here is a shot of a few of my older guns during my last trap shoot. An old Model 12, 12 bore and a Remington 29.

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  #47  
Old August 7th, 2007, 08:14 AM
Mike_Rupp Mike_Rupp is offline
Mike Rupp
WZ7V
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Mercer Island, WA
Posts: 862
Quote:
Originally Posted by matttaylor
Man, I dig some Allen Edmunds. I've been meaning to order a pair of black wingtips from them, but I haven't gotten around to it.

I've owned one pair of Allen Edmunds and loved them.

I'd like to get a pair of classic wingtips from them and just send them off every few years to get rebuilt.

They have some ghetto fabulous shoes in their catalogue, though. I stick with the classics.

Allen Edmonds are wonderful shoes. I bought a pair and wore them for several years. They felt like a slipper. One day I kicked something and took a huge chunk out of the leather. I was so depressed. It was a much worse feeling than when I got some body damage on my Discovery.

When I lived in the Midwest, I used to drive past the factory store north of Milwaukee fairly often. I think I ended up buying 3 pairs.

I wonder if Dan Chapman has ever owned a truly good set of footwear. If I was sure of the quality, I wouldn't hesitate at spending serious coin on a pair of hunting boots like the Russells.
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  #48  
Old August 7th, 2007, 08:23 AM
greghirst greghirst is offline
Greg Hirst
KI6CQL
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 2,287
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_Rupp
I wonder if Dan Chapman has ever owned a truly good set of footwear.

He splurged on a set of these for hunting/formal occasions.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg reef.jpg (24.3 KB, 9 views)
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  #49  
Old August 7th, 2007, 08:32 AM
reelpain
 
Posts: n/a
Isn't Quicksilver a brand name? Like Oakley? Good one Greg.
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  #50  
Old August 7th, 2007, 08:53 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by greghirst
He splurged on a set of these for hunting/formal occasions.


Ahhhh the Reefs with a bottle opener on the sole.

Because naturally, I want to take the bottom of my shoe and touch it to something I'm going to put in my mouth.
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