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  #26  
Old June 16th, 2008, 03:18 PM
Nadir_E
 
Posts: n/a
Some folks I met from Alpine Training Service teach climbing and canyoneering. They liked to 'play' in the falls of the Lower Santa Anita canyon. I expect it's not the same after the recent fire with all the mud and debris that would've washed down after the rains.

Nice pictures - looks like a lot of fun!
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  #27  
Old June 16th, 2008, 08:34 PM
kellymoe kellymoe is offline
Kevin Mokracek
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtnrovr
Yesterday did some local canyoneering over at Eaton Canyon.
So sad to see that even these beautiful areas are prone to graffiti. What a disgrace.

Nice pictures of your trip. Have you done Upper Big Tujunga Narrows? I used to kayak Upper Big T from Camp Colby down to the reservoir. There are a few sections that look much like Eaton. Even a few rappels. We also kayaked from Switzer Falles down to JPL. Lots of good pool drop slides and falls.
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  #28  
Old June 17th, 2008, 02:38 PM
montanablur montanablur is offline
Sinuhe Xavier
yes
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Neither here, nor there...
Posts: 584
Andy Dappen sent me some images from our trip in 1995. The whole slide show can be seen here.

"Sinuhe is trying to keep the faith, but as he looks out the rain-soaked windshield at the neon greenness of the Cascadian brush, he is entertaining serious doubts about whether his 12-hour drive from Montana to Mt. Rainier National Park wasn't in the pursuit of a lunatic's grail. "Snow line's at 5400 feet now," I console him as he marvels over the verdent foothills. "We're in for 9000 feet of vertical." The story that accompanied the trip can be seen here.





I drove 12 hours straight from Bozeman to Seattle grabbed 3 hours sleep and drove to Paradise on the Southern face of Rainier and started hiking. It was brutal, I was in close to the best shape of my life and that mountain spanked me.
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  #29  
Old June 17th, 2008, 02:49 PM
mtnrovr mtnrovr is offline
Ryan Tolentino
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by montanablur
I drove 12 hours straight from Bozeman to Seattle grabbed 3 hours sleep and drove to Paradise on the Southern face of Rainier and started hiking. It was brutal, I was in close to the best shape of my life and that mountain spanked me.

you're crazy man, and i like it!

edit: Again Sinuhe...spectacular photos and incredible story. Thank you for posting that.
So basically your ascent and descent was a total of 2 days on Mt. Rainier?
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  #30  
Old June 17th, 2008, 03:59 PM
kellymoe kellymoe is offline
Kevin Mokracek
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by montanablur
Andy Dappen sent me some images from our trip in 1995. The whole slide show can be seen here.

"Sinuhe is trying to keep the faith, but as he looks out the rain-soaked windshield at the neon greenness of the Cascadian brush, he is entertaining serious doubts about whether his 12-hour drive from Montana to Mt. Rainier National Park wasn't in the pursuit of a lunatic's grail. "Snow line's at 5400 feet now," I console him as he marvels over the verdent foothills. "We're in for 9000 feet of vertical." The story that accompanied the trip can be seen here.


I drove 12 hours straight from Bozeman to Seattle grabbed 3 hours sleep and drove to Paradise on the Southern face of Rainier and started hiking. It was brutal, I was in close to the best shape of my life and that mountain spanked me.

Sinuhe,

How bout a warm up on Shasta this Summer? Do you have a split board? Have you skied it? I have always wanted to ski Shasta. Lets do it.
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  #31  
Old June 17th, 2008, 05:06 PM
dankemper dankemper is offline
Dan Kemper
KK6ECF
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Lafayette, CA
Posts: 20
rainer

Sinhue....that looks like it was epic
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  #32  
Old November 15th, 2010, 07:35 AM
ronward ronward is offline
KI4WWU
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Columbus, GA
Posts: 739
Back to the Bibler Discussion...

Anyone have photos of the internal pole construction in the I-Tent, Eldorado, or Ahwahnee?
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  #33  
Old November 15th, 2010, 02:28 PM
nosivad_bor nosivad_bor is offline
Rob Davison
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 1,051
"internal pole construction" as in the wall thickness of the pole?
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  #34  
Old November 16th, 2010, 07:18 AM
ronward ronward is offline
KI4WWU
 
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Location: Columbus, GA
Posts: 739
No, the way the poles fit inside the tent. The tent is erected via the two poles crossing over the top of the inside of the tent. This is what I want to see.
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1990 Range Rover Classic
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  #35  
Old November 16th, 2010, 09:10 AM
hochung hochung is offline
Ho Chung
W6HC
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Rancho Palos Verdes, CA
Posts: 2,007
the poles just cross at the top of the tent:



and they are held in place by plastic clips:

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  #36  
Old November 16th, 2010, 09:28 AM
chris snell chris snell is offline
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,384
Ron, I'll give you a good deal on my BD Ahwahnee tent if you want to buy it. It has a small tear that could be repaired by BD but you could just put a patch on it if you prefer.

Honestly, I don't like the tent at all. It doesn't breathe very well and didn't work well for wet-weather camping (South Texas summer) or for winter camping. The condensation would build up and get my sleeping bag wet. The Ahwahnee performed well in the desert but I ended up buying a MSR Hubba Hubba that is more of an all-around tent.

The BD version is just about the same, I think, except that it uses velcro straps to secure the poles to the inside edges of the tent.
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  #37  
Old November 16th, 2010, 10:05 AM
ronward ronward is offline
KI4WWU
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Columbus, GA
Posts: 739
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris snell
Ron, I'll give you a good deal on my BD Ahwahnee tent if you want to buy it...it doesn't breathe very well and didn't work well for wet-weather camping or for winter camping. The condensation would build up and get my sleeping bag wet...

Sounds like I need to keep looking for a wet and/or cold climate packable tent then. Thanks for the info and the offer though.

Ron
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  #38  
Old November 16th, 2010, 04:32 PM
Mike_Rupp Mike_Rupp is offline
Mike Rupp
WZ7V
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Mercer Island, WA
Posts: 864
Quote:
Originally Posted by ronward
Sounds like I need to keep looking for a wet and/or cold climate packable tent then. Thanks for the info and the offer though.

Ron

Regular tents with rainflys tend to work fine in damp conditions. I've used my 18 yr old Walrus tent in just about every condition (heavy snow in BC, desert in CA, and thunderstorms in IN) and it has worked fine. It is a heavy beast, but that isn't a big concern when it is used for car camping.
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  #39  
Old November 17th, 2010, 09:06 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_Rupp
Regular tents with rainflys tend to work fine in damp conditions. I've used my 18 yr old Walrus tent in just about every condition (heavy snow in BC, desert in CA, and thunderstorms in IN) and it has worked fine. It is a heavy beast, but that isn't a big concern when it is used for car camping.


Sinuhe is Mr. Single-Wall, so hopefully he'll way in, but I'm like Mike. I've used my North Face Mountain Tent for something like 15 years now in every climate and terrain imaginable. I don't think of it as particularly heavy, but it's definitely not light enough for backpacking. When these tent convos come up I usually mention my NF. But I also haven't been keeping on the up and up with tent technology.

I think Sinuhe told me something like when he was a NF athlete they used to throw NF rain flys over Bibler tents because the Biblers were so much better.
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  #40  
Old November 17th, 2010, 09:28 AM
dchapman dchapman is offline
Daniel Chapman
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 1,126
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  #41  
Old November 18th, 2010, 12:11 PM
benlittle benlittle is offline
Ben Little
KE7BEN
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Salt Lake City
Posts: 392
I personally don't like single wall tents. I love the idea of them but the implementation doesn't work for me.

I have a NF mountain 25, NF himalayan 47 and NF tadpole 23. I love all three for their individual purpose.

The 25 and himalayan are my winter tents and I use the tadpole as a solo backpacking tent. All three have one of the most important things to me besides build quality, a nice vestibule. When you're stuck in a tent for 4-5 days, you need a vestibule.

This winter, however, I'm going strictly igloo/ snowcave. Oh and Yurt
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  #42  
Old November 18th, 2010, 04:29 PM
ronward ronward is offline
KI4WWU
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Columbus, GA
Posts: 739
I tried out a Yurt for the first time in October. Splendid.
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1990 Range Rover Classic
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  #43  
Old November 22nd, 2010, 11:34 PM
craig craig is offline
Craig Miller
K7NAV
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Mount Vernon, WA
Posts: 33
The NF VE25 tent Jack mentioned has been a standard in the climbing industry for years. The Mountain Hardware Trango 3.1 is generally reviewed as being everything the VE25 is with the few small problem areas improved. Check out the reviews, I think you'll be impressed with both the content of the reviews and the sheer number of them. It's hands down the best tent I've ever owned.

My personal review is that I've used it very comfortably in the Olympic Rain Forest, on the side of Mount Baker, and in the shrub steppe terrain of the Columbia Plateau in the middle of summer.

There is a new "Event" fabric that is supposed to be significantly more breathable and water resistant than Gore-Tex Pro. Is anyone making a single wall tent with it yet?
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