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  #551  
Old May 10th, 2014, 03:46 PM
greghirst greghirst is offline
Greg Hirst
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Not surprising since it was a Giugiaro design that was supposed to be built by Lamborghini. BMW ended up farming out production to Baur in Germany after financial and production problems at Lamborghini.
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  #552  
Old May 17th, 2014, 02:03 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Prototype of SRAM's electronic drivetrain spotted at the Tour of California:








Turns out the control box and wires are decoys and this system is WIRELESS:


That's awesome. My primary objection to electronic drivetrain is aesthetic. But if the electronic can be even cleaner than the mechanical, that's very tempting. No more multiple holes in the frame for routing the shift cables and housings. Also imagine the possibilities with satellite shifters on the drops and by the stem.
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  #553  
Old May 17th, 2014, 03:05 PM
traveltoad traveltoad is offline
Aaron Shrier
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Let the bike shifter frequency hacking scandals begin!
____________________
2003 Discovery
2007 KTM 950R Super Enduro - FOR SALE
2010 KTM 250XC-W
2016 SoulCraft Dirtbomb
2016 FoundryOverland

You only lost went running out o gas ,the rest is exploring Javier

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  #554  
Old May 23rd, 2014, 02:31 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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  #555  
Old May 23rd, 2014, 03:02 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Love that pic. Remember the premier issue of Winning magazine?:

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  #556  
Old May 24th, 2014, 09:38 PM
hanchung hanchung is offline
wsixhan
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Went for a ride w/ my nephew the other day and he took some pics during our ride. This one came out pretty nice...



That picture became this... hehehe...

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  #557  
Old May 27th, 2014, 10:32 AM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Speaking of Campagnolo, Campagnolo just released new mechanical groups.

New crank that looks like a Dura-Ace copy:

Quote:
Campagnolo’s four-arm crankset accommodates three different chainring configurations: 50/34, 52/36 and 53/39. Crank arms are sold in three lengths: 170, 172.5 and 175mm.

Levers:

Quote:
The Italian engineers have also gone to work on the groupsets’ shifters, with refined internals and ergonomics that Campagnolo claims will interface more cleanly with different handlebar shapes.

The most notable update here is the front shifter action. It requires two clicks to downshift to the little ring. From there, you have one click of trim. Click it three times to put it in the big ring. Also, Campy claims that the entire range of gears are usable without any rub or ugly cross-chaining, similar to SRAM’s “True 22” concept.

Front derailleur that also looks like a Dura-Ace copy:

Quote:
The front sports a one-piece carbon outer cage, as well as a lengthened arm to boost cable leverage.

Rear derailleur:

Quote:
The rear derailleur now moves at a different angle relative to the cassette. Campagnolo claims that this pulls the chain closer to the cogs and allows for smoother shifts into larger cassette cogs, all the way up to a 29-tooth.

The body of the derailleur has been stiffened as well, further improving shifting performance. The chain will wrap further around the cassette as well, engaging with more teeth, which will improve durability of both the cassette and chain.

I'm digging the new rear derailleur with the zigzag parallelogram. It would be awesome if Campagnolo designed the geometry so that the upper pulley tracked perfectly with a 53/39 crankset and 11-29 cassette.
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  #558  
Old May 27th, 2014, 11:59 AM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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In response to Campy's new groupsets, Shimano released its new Dura-Ace 9500:

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  #559  
Old May 27th, 2014, 01:24 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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I love how Lemond is cut out of the pic.
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  #560  
Old June 23rd, 2014, 04:28 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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More pics of Campagnolo's latest:

Quote:
Also new for 2015 is a completely redesigned Super Record mechanical group. As you might guess, the Super Record drivetrain carries the highest price of any mechanical group, but will still be comparably priced to the current version of Super Record. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

The levers look pretty much the same but with new hoods and internals:

Quote:
As with anything that carries the Campagnolo Super Record title, the shift levers use about as much carbon as a new Boeing Airbus. The shift lever internals are all new and are incompatible with any other Campagnolo drivetrain, at least for now. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com


I wonder what Campy did to the internals.

Alien rear derailleur:

Quote:
The new Super Record rear derailleur is, for lack of a better term, a work of art. Nearly every piece of the rear mechanism is carbon or titanium, while the jockey-wheels have ceramic bearings. It weighs 160 grams. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

The limit screws are now grub screws. They look like Torx in that pic, but it's hard to tell. I hope they're not Torx.

I wonder if the pulleys really do have ceramic bearings. My Super Record was claimed to have ceramic bearings, but only the lower pulley had ceramic bearings while the upper had a ceramic bushing. What a rip-off.

I think Campy needs to go back to the drawing board on the knuckles. They look like glass-reinforced plastic rather than carbon fiber. And it's bullshit how the cable adjuster is stainless rather than titanium. Still, 160g is really really light.

New front derailleur:

Quote:
The new front derailleur gets a longer lever arm that closely resembles Shimano's 11-speed derailleurs. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

Closely resembles? That means copy. Also a Shimano copy is the crank:




Even with the awesome CULT bearings, I can't dig this crank. The back side looks pretty neat though:

Quote:
The Super Record crank uses eight chainring bolts that tighten into the crank spider. This stiffens the crankset when shifting and makes the crank convertible between standard and compact gear ratios. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

The four-arm spider is looking pretty cool there, and I love the concave edge of the small ring. The eight chainring bolts sort of ruins it as well. I guess there are no chainring nuts, but eight chainring bolts seems complex to me.

The cassette looks the same:


There may be slight differences, but it looks the same to me.

The hits for me are the levers and rear derailleur. They have that erotic Alien Giger style to them.
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  #561  
Old June 24th, 2014, 09:30 AM
hanchung hanchung is offline
wsixhan
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The cassette looks more polished and "finished" with rounder edges. I still say bring back the full Titanium cassette.
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  #562  
Old July 2nd, 2014, 11:44 AM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Le Tour kicks off this weekend. I'm ecstatic about Stage 5:


Quote:
Ypres to Arenberg Porte du Hainaut (155.5km)

Wednesday, July 9th 8:00 a.m. – 11:18 a.m. EDT

Race organizers have decided to enliven the 2014 race with cobblestones, which will strike fear into the main contenders. There may be only 15.4km of cobblestones compared to the 50km that form Paris-Roubaix, which passes through the same territory, but it only takes one little section of stones to bring riders crashing down, or send some home with a broken collarbone. The cobblestones are spread out over nine separate sections, during the last 70km of this stage, so expect the overall contenders’ teams to be most jittery late in the day. The Tour may not be won here, but it can certainly be lost. The stage starts in Belgium, at Ypres, a town that gained notoriety for gas attacks in World War I. Clearly, the Tour de France couldn’t ignore paying tribute in its own way to the ceremonies marking the centenary of the start of the First World War. This route should offer us a fabulous battle.


Those kids are badass.
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  #563  
Old July 2nd, 2014, 12:23 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Highlights from the Hell of the North stage of the 2010 Tour:


What carnage. What love.
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  #564  
Old July 2nd, 2014, 04:29 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Quote:
In this 1914 illustration provided by the WielerMuseum Roeselare, an illustrated map of the Tour de France that took place in 1914. On June 28, 1914, 145 riders lined up to start the 12th running of the Tour de France, including a record seven previous Tour champions. That same day, a continent away, a political assassination took place that would have consequences unimaginable to the riders as they pedaled across Normandy to Le Havre. (AP Photo/Wielermuseum)


Quote:
French cyclist and 1907 and 1908 Tour de France winner Lucien Petit-Briton stands with his bike. Three former winners of the Tour de France; Octave Lapize, Francois Faber and Lucien Petit-Breton all died fighting in World War I. Breton was the first rider to win the tour in two consecutive years. (AP Photo/Wielermuseum)


Quote:
French cyclist and 1909 Tour de France winner Francois Faber with his bike. Three former winners of the Tour de France; Octave Lapize, Francois Faber and Lucien Petit-Breton all died fighting in World War I. Faber died in 1915. (AP Photo/Collection Privee Ivan Bonduelle)


Quote:
French cyclist and 1910 Tour de France winner Octave Lapize stands with his bike. Three former winners of the Tour de France; Octave Lapize, Francois Faber and Lucien Petit-Breton all died fighting in World War I. (AP Photo/Wielermuseum)

Lapize also won Paris-Roubaix three times in a row:




Quote:
In this August 1916 file photo, Gen. Sam Hughes and an unidentified group look at ruins in Arras, France during World War I. Approximately 45 Tour de France riders lost their lives during the 1914-1918 war. The 2014 Tour de France will ride along key points of the Western Front, including Ypres, Belgium and Arras, France to pay homage to all soldiers who died in the war. (AP Photo, File)


Quote:
A wooden cross with a paper poppy and a photo are left at a World War I memorial in Arras, France. One hundred years after the war began, Tour de France organizers have decided to mark the anniversary with a series of stages across the northern and eastern French and Belgian battlefields where so many lives were lost. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)


Quote:
A monument to a Belgian World War I cycling battalion in Stuivenskerke, Belgium. Late in the 19th century the Belgian Army took an interest in the newly emerging sport of cycling. A separate unit was created and came to be known as the Cyclist Riflemen. During World War I they played a key role in the Battle of Haelen in Belgium. The German Army nicknamed them the Black Devils, owing to their black outfits and hats, as well as their fast silent movements. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)


Quote:
The cathedral in the town square of Ypres, Belgium, is in ruins after the bombing during World War I. One hundred years after the war began, Tour de France organizers have decided to mark the anniversary with a series of stages across the northern and eastern French and Belgian battlefields where so many lives were lost. (AP Photo, File)
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  #565  
Old July 7th, 2014, 12:33 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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These are great posts.
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  #566  
Old July 7th, 2014, 02:53 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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These guys rode the stage 5 parcours and give a run-down of the secteurs:


I hope it rains. I love how colorful and beautiful the cobbles look when they're wet.
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  #567  
Old July 8th, 2014, 02:00 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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  #568  
Old July 8th, 2014, 06:46 PM
greghirst greghirst is offline
Greg Hirst
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Team FDJ deserves to win the Tour on Marc Madiot's passion alone-



You've got to love a team that has to listen to La Marseillaise and Le chant des partisans in the team bus regardless of what country the cyclists are from. It must be like joining the French Foreign Legion for the few foreigners that have made the team.





Vive la France!
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  #569  
Old July 8th, 2014, 09:21 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Things aren't going well for the Belgians, French, and British.

The Germans took stage 1 in England:


The British crashed and burned on their home turf:


The British Royal Family (of German descent) had to bow to the Germans:


In stage 3, the Germans then took London by storm:


In Stage 4, the British suffered further losses:


The French fought with bravery and daring:


They were combative enough that they were decorated:


But the Germans won again:


The Battle of Flanders is tomorrow. We'll see if the Germans can beat the Belgians at their own game. John Degenkolb may take it for the Fatherland.

It's rumored this has been playing in the Giant-Shimano team bus all week:

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  #570  
Old July 8th, 2014, 09:50 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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The Italians took stage 2:


Count Francesco Baracca added another victory to his palmares:


Baracca is the origin of the famous Ferrari badge:


Baracca's machine:


Quote:
Enzo Ferrari told the story of the prancing horse logo just once:
The horse was painted on the fuselage of the fighter plane of Francesco Baracca — a heroic airman of the first world war. In ’23, I met count Enrico Baracca, the hero’s father, and then his mother, countess Paulina, who said to me one day, ‘Ferrari, put my son’s prancing horse on your cars. It will bring you good luck’. The horse was, and still is, black, and I added the canary yellow background which is the colour of Modena.
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  #571  
Old July 8th, 2014, 11:54 PM
david despain david despain is offline
David Despain
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WW I aircraft

I am certainly no WW I aircraft expert but I believe the top picture is a SPAD S.VII, a french plane. This would have been most likely fitted with a single centerline cowl mounted synchronized .303 Vickers machine gun. It's possible I'm off on the variant, if it is a S.XIII then it would have had two of the Vickers guns, but I don't think so as the later planes had a vertical louvered cowl opening.

The second picture is I think the French Nieuport 17. It too would have been fitted most probably with a center single .303 Vickers gun. The wires you see coming out the side of the fuselage go to the elevator. The rooster was the emblem of the 90th squadron, the "singing cocks".

He was a flight instructor and trainer and after his death a phase of the flight training program was named in his honor.
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  #572  
Old July 8th, 2014, 11:59 PM
david despain david despain is offline
David Despain
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
Baracca is the origin of the famous Ferrari badge:

Baracca's machine:



The prancing horse here is also on a SPAD, This is the later variant the SPAD S.XIII
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  #573  
Old July 12th, 2014, 11:48 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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Reading this year's installment of John's TdF posts are better than watching the Tour itself.
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  #574  
Old July 12th, 2014, 03:10 PM
greghirst greghirst is offline
Greg Hirst
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  #575  
Old July 13th, 2014, 08:46 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Nice video of stage 5:


They're not even rolling that fast and yet the cars are bottoming on the pave. Love that.
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