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  #26  
Old March 10th, 2014, 12:42 PM
dchapman dchapman is offline
Daniel Chapman
KJ4BXR
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 1,117
Nothing says poser like having a roll cage and not tying it to the frame.
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  #27  
Old March 10th, 2014, 05:58 PM
benlittle benlittle is online now
Ben Little
KE7BEN
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Salt Lake City
Posts: 387
We'll done, Chris. You'll be motoring before I get my galvy chassis built into a roller.
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  #28  
Old March 10th, 2014, 06:40 PM
nosivad_bor nosivad_bor is offline
Rob Davison
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 1,051
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSQ
I hate that roll cage. Its certainly safer, but it's terrible.

You should ditch that awkward cage. It's going to keep making your life difficult and it's ugly as hell.
I had my roll cage made in the pattern of the hoop set. It's not factory and it's not tied to the frame at every corner, but it looks pretty close and it's reasonably strong.


____________________
-Rob
1999 Discovery 1

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  #29  
Old March 23rd, 2014, 07:49 PM
chris snell chris snell is offline
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
Lots of progress made in the engine bay. The timing was set and the timing cover was bolted down. The serpentine belt was installed, as were the fuel lines and brake lines. The new Allard radiator and intercooler are now in. This thing is a monster. It's absolutely massive.





I had anticipated lots of problems getting everything plumbed because I'm combining two separate aftermarket kit each with their own set of adapters and hoses. It turned out to not be so bad after all. It really helps when you have another 110 with 300Tdi parked next to you. There are a couple of small issues to sort but I hope to have a running motor by next weekend.
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  #30  
Old April 3rd, 2014, 10:57 AM
chris snell chris snell is offline
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
The swap is almost done. I got the seat box and cab finished last weekend and installed the new chassis harness. I found some diesel-resistant heat shrink to protect the harness since I'm running it on top of the frame instead of the typical internal routing. This heatshrink is pretty crazy stuff. The walls are almost 1/8" thick when shrunken but still flexible. Here it is, mounted up:



The tunnels, floor plates, and seat box are different for R380 trucks so I had to modify those:





All mounted up:



The M&D Engineering Fast and the Furious turbo is out. The plumbing kit that came with it is just terrible. It fits and it works but this is what you get:



I couldn't bring myself to run the motor like this. It's a brand-new remanufactured block and I want to break it in gently, with stock ancillaries.

I picked up a stock turbo a few months back as part of a box of 300Tdi spares I got from the UK. It was in pretty bad shape and looked like it had been sitting in the ocean for a few months. I took it over to the local turbo rebuilders and they were able to work some magic and save it with the help of an Easy Out and a lot of media blasting. They rebuilt it with new bearings and a new thrust washer and here's what I have now:



Barring any motor trouble, the truck will run this weekend. All that's left to do is to install the turbo and fill the fluids. I'm hoping that we'll be driving my truck to lunch on Saturday.

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  #31  
Old April 3rd, 2014, 11:45 AM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,070
Looking good.
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  #32  
Old April 3rd, 2014, 06:45 PM
alexcivick alexcivick is offline
Alex Civick
KF5AAM
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: SaTx
Posts: 5
Trade it in for a 130
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  #33  
Old April 3rd, 2014, 10:57 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
You're going to install a completely different turbo for gentle break-in?
That's hilarious.

If that was something you even needed to do you could have just bled all the boost off the VVT.

Good for you for carefully rebuilding your truck into something even nicer than you started with, but that turbo swap is even funnier than the giant Allard radiator. The three hundy runs so cool it comes with a little shoebox lid for a radiator and people still have to put a muff on it half the time just to get up to a decent operating temp. I'm still cracking up from that one.
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  #34  
Old April 7th, 2014, 10:55 AM
Bruno Bruno is offline
Bruno Tome
N8YQ
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 921
Good stuff, Chris.

Do you have a link for that heat shrink, sounds like something i need to have in stock.
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  #35  
Old April 7th, 2014, 11:43 AM
chris snell chris snell is offline
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
Got the motor running yesterday:



I forgot my ignition key back at the house so we had to get it going westside San Antonio style. The MOD ignition is a lot simpler (and less theft-resistant) than the regular ROW ignitions. The tumbler pops right out and a 6mm allen key fits right in. The truck came off the boat with only one ignition key and it was so badly worn that it barely raised the pins enough to turn the tumbler. I have a new tumbler and key set on order but until then, I'm using a Beta key:



I also forgot to pull my overflow reservoir from the old motor when I sold it so I'm using a plastic can until my new brass unit arrives.

While I was busy connecting hoses and filling fluids, my buddy Brian rebuilt his old PS box for my truck. I'm taking the lines over to the hose shop to have them rebuilt. The PS lines on a Defender are a massive pain in the ass to install, even with the wings off. I hope I never have to do that job again, especially on the trail. I'm very excited to have PS in the truck.
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  #36  
Old April 7th, 2014, 11:50 AM
chris snell chris snell is offline
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruno
Good stuff, Chris.

Do you have a link for that heat shrink, sounds like something i need to have in stock.

Bruno, I got the heat shrink from heatshrink.com. I used the 1-1/2" diameter size of this stuff:

http://www.heatshrink.com/heat_shrin.../cfw_d_4ft.asp
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  #37  
Old April 8th, 2014, 05:40 AM
Bruno Bruno is offline
Bruno Tome
N8YQ
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 921
Thanks, Chris.
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  #38  
Old April 8th, 2014, 03:08 PM
dchapman dchapman is offline
Daniel Chapman
KJ4BXR
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 1,117
Do all 300's run that rough? Looks like you could mix margaritas on the top of that engine. The 7.3L making triple the power I have in my Ford F-250 runs smoother than that.
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  #39  
Old April 8th, 2014, 03:58 PM
greghirst greghirst is offline
Greg Hirst
KI6CQL
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 2,287
Really Dan?

You mean a computerized V8 diesel runs smoother than a very simple archaic 4 cylinder diesel? For that matter, any V8 is naturally going to be smoother-running than a 4 cylinder-even a modern balance-shafted one.

That's like saying your 7.3 powerstroke runs smoother and makes more power than grandpa's tractor.
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  #40  
Old April 9th, 2014, 04:02 AM
dmarchand dmarchand is offline
David Marchand
KB1NYP
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 177
Chris, if you want some extra theft protection. Wire a hidden switch (on/off) inline to the fuel cutoff solenoid. I use this periodically either when parking in town, or when parked overnight somewhere not entirely comforting.
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  #41  
Old April 9th, 2014, 08:54 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
That three hundy is running like a top. That's a happy sound. It's not angry at all.
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  #42  
Old April 9th, 2014, 08:55 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmarchand
Chris, if you want some extra theft protection. Wire a hidden switch (on/off) inline to the fuel cutoff solenoid. I use this periodically either when parking in town, or when parked overnight somewhere not entirely comforting.

This is a good call. I've even popped the hood and disconnected the fuel cut-off solenoid before.
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  #43  
Old April 9th, 2014, 09:38 AM
dchapman dchapman is offline
Daniel Chapman
KJ4BXR
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 1,117
Quote:
Originally Posted by greghirst
Really Dan?

You mean a computerized V8 diesel runs smoother than a very simple archaic 4 cylinder diesel? For that matter, any V8 is naturally going to be smoother-running than a 4 cylinder-even a modern balance-shafted one.

That's like saying your 7.3 powerstroke runs smoother and makes more power than grandpa's tractor.

I guess that's why I asked the question. Seeing this engine run made me think of my granddads old Isuzu Pup with the diesel engine. When that thing started up it sounded like someone shoveling gravel into a mortar mixer and the entire truck shook like a wet dog. That's when I was a little kid, thought things would have changed by now. Guess not.
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  #44  
Old April 9th, 2014, 03:49 PM
chris snell chris snell is offline
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmarchand
Chris, if you want some extra theft protection. Wire a hidden switch (on/off) inline to the fuel cutoff solenoid. I use this periodically either when parking in town, or when parked overnight somewhere not entirely comforting.

That's pretty cool. I wonder where I'd hide the switch.

On a similar topic, do you guys carry an extra solenoid in your spares kit? I was talking with Ben and Jason yesterday about what spares I would carry. The ex-MOD 300Tdi list is so much smaller than my old V8 D90 list. Here's what I've got:

Should haves:

- two u-joints
- serpentine belt
- spare plastic plug for top of thermostat housing
- spare shock f+r
- spare shock bushings f+r (full set because they always seem to go at the same time)
- fuel cut-off solenoid
- 12" fuel line, 6" hard line (pre-flared), 4 hose clamps
- basic load of fluids
- fuel filter
- glass tube fuses (until I replace the fuse panel)
- 20' of primary wire
- a variety of terminal ends (spade, ring) and butt splices
- extra hose clamps for engine bay stuff
- TREs

Nice to haves:

- ignition module
- lift pump
- water pump

For my next trip, I'm not even fucking around with spare axles or CVs. The little diesel just putts along and I can't see myself breaking one. Even the little stuff like drive member flange bolts and the NAS fuel pump relays are out of the kit now. I'm aiming to get fluids, spares, and tools in one single 1610.
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  #45  
Old April 9th, 2014, 04:02 PM
dmarchand dmarchand is offline
David Marchand
KB1NYP
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 177
Thanks, I can PM you where i have my switch mounted. Really can be anywhere not obvious and having it in the cab makes it a little easier for you.

I carry the spare lift and water pump. Also a spare PS pump. I had two take a dump (one many years old, the replacement likely faulty from factory) this past summer while at events. You aren't kidding about how bad the lines suck. On the 2.8, the pump is on the main belt, not aux like the AC compressor. Not sure what the setup is on the 300. Also a spare injector or two, fuel filter, etc. Make sure you pick up the right sized wading plugs for the bell housing and crank case. I keep a couple items like head gasket, spare alternator, and injection pump on the basement shelves, marked and boxed in case I need my wife to fedex something.
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  #46  
Old April 10th, 2014, 05:11 AM
dchapman dchapman is offline
Daniel Chapman
KJ4BXR
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 1,117
I saw one once that was made form a cigar lighter. Push the lighter in and the truck would start. Pretty slick.
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  #47  
Old April 12th, 2014, 09:46 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris snell
On a similar topic, do you guys carry an extra solenoid in your spares kit?

I think this comes down to what you need to get home and what you need to keep going.

That is to say, if you just need to be able to limp it, a truck like a mechanical diesel Ex-Mod isn't going to need a lot go keep rolling. However, if you're on a challenging route and you want to keep going forward you might need the vehicle to be closer to full performance.

I carry far fewer spares in the 300Tdi 110 then I did in the V8 Disco 1 and even fewer in the LJ78 Land Cruiser. When we hit Death Valley John was positively shocked at how little I brought in the Toyota. That's mainly due to the much stronger drivetrain. The LJ78 axles, CVs, R&P and driveshafts are so strong that even with ARBs front and rear it would be hard to break anything with the 2LTE 2.4L turbo-diesel.

In the case of your 110 I would prioritize spares in the following six categories of descending importance:
  • Steering
  • Rolling
  • Running
  • Four-wheeling
  • Cooling
  • Mending

In the first category you have whatever you need to be able direct the truck whether it's moving under its own power or not. It's nearly impossible to extract a truck you cannot steer. This means TREs, steering column coupling, tie rod (if not HD) and drop link (if not HD). This does not necessarily mean any P/S components.

In the second cateogry you have the items necessary to keep the wheels turning. This is largely tire related as those constitute the vast majority of failures in the field. Safety seal, valves, cores, on-board air etc. Then you have wheel and hub components. On your 110 wheel bearings are important. They can literally weld themselves to the stub axle when they fail. Grease and appropriate seals to go with the bearings.

In the third you have powertrain components. These are the essentials to keep the engine firing even if it's not running optimally. This meant a huge box on the EFI V8s but it's nice and small with the 300 Tdi. Essentials would be a lift pump, fuel cut-off solenoid, timing belt and spare oil filter (should it be perforated). The serpentine belt isn't really essential to just limp but why wouldn't you bring it? A throttle cable is similarly easy to bring. You also need to be prepared for turbo failure that results in oil consumption. This could be catastrophic if you don't realize when it's happening. You need to have a means to choke the engine out of air to kill it and then you need to be able block the turbo feed and return cooler lines, remove all boost, turn down the fuel and run the truck NA. That's just to limp. If you want to keep driving to Patagonia you should just have a spare turbo. Oil cooler lines should be converted to braided stainless. They can still leak but they won't burst. You should have some engine oil. How much is up to you. Bulk fuel line is also good. Even if you don't have means to complete a fuel line you should have a means to block it off. Diesels can run on reduced cylinders. It's angry but it works. However, they cannot run without sufficient fuel pressure and that requires a closed system. If you're leaking fuel anywhere but from the return line it's going to be rough. A spare IP would be bulky, heavy and expensive but it sure would be nice.
If your truck has an autobox you'll need a starter. If your truck is a manual I consider at least the rebuild kits for the clutch MC and slave to be essential. I'd rather have the entire units. You can do a lot of angry powershifting when your hydraulics go but it's going to be pretty rough. These components are junk and they fail all the time. You should have some gearbox fluid and some clutch/brake fluid. How much is up to you.

In the fourth category are the driveline parts that keep all four wheels turning. You can take a pass on many parts in this category if all you need to do is drive home on a highway, but if you've driven into something tough and it's going to be a hard drive out, you might want to have the means to keep all of your capabilities. At least one set of U-joints is essential. It's not impossible to have both drive shafts suffer failure. You'll be dead in the water with no driveshafts. With the 300 Tdi I believe that HD driveline components are unlikely to break but stockers are still vulnerable particularly with traction differentials. If you still have an open front carrier with 10/24 half shafts this is a serious vulnerability. The carrier housing can break even if everything else is also stock. Those half-shafts aren't especially strong on the 10 spline end either. Similarly the 3.54 R&P in the front is weak on the reverse side so you need to take that into account. A single CV certainly makes sense if you want to keep fourwheeling. A lot of driveline failures are going to require you to open things up and fish broken parts out before you can keep going. Wouldn't you rather be able to put the replacement in right then and there rather then leaving it empty only to have to tear into it again? Keep in mind that a half-shaft acts as an oil seal and if you run without it things will get messy fast. You should have some gear oil. How much is up to you.

The fifth category consists of engine cooling. The engine doesn't need to be cooled at all to run. But you will only be able to travel very short distances before you have to shut it down over and over again. Hoses are a great spare. They are cheap, light and easy. Similarly the WP on a 300 Tdi is like fifty bucks. Just bring it. The fan is vulnerable but it's a difficult spare. I'd like to find a metal replacement like the NAPA astro van fan for the V8s. The fan clutch is not necessary. If your expansion tank is plastic make sure it's a new white one. That plug on the thermostat housing can be replaced with the brass one just like the radiator. Ditch the plastic and forget about it. 300 Tdi's run pretty cool. This is a pretty low area of concern but if you have coolant pouring out on the ground it's an issue you'll need to address. How much coolant you bring is up to you. Obviously you can just add tap water but you'll want to flush the whole system later.

The sixth and final category is mending. This is just all the bits your bring along to make your own repairs instead of R&R. Fuses, wire, connectors, right stuff, hylomar, JB weld, PB Blastr, zip ties, hoes clamps, duct tape, assorted fasteners, bulk fuel line, bulk coolant hose, rivets

A few gravy spares that aren't so essential but make life so much better would be an alternator, brake lines, spare shocks, etc. The Tdi's will run a long time on a big battery with no alternator as long as you don't have any lights on, but it will die eventually when there isn't power to keep the fuel solenoid open. I don't consider braking all that crucial, but it sure is nice. Land Rovers have such an outstanding hand brake that you can do a lot with that alone, but having real brakes sure is easier. I try to have appropriate shocks so I don't bring spares but some people (*cough* Rob Davison *cough) break a shock on every trip. Headlight bulbs are also small and light. The gravy spares are typically things you add after they broke and you were annoyed. It's more about learning from experience.

Hope that helps.
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  #48  
Old November 20th, 2014, 06:17 PM
chris snell chris snell is offline
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
The 110 is coming along. I've made a number of changes since I last posted photos in April.

The monster radiator is out. Like Jack said, the little motor just doesn't need it. Besides being overkill, the radiator frame was designed for a newer truck and my mounts didn't line up. I would have needed to adapt newer-style mounts to my old-style wings. It just wasn't worth the trouble. I picked up a stock radiator with the shitty plastic tanks and made some simple brackets to tie the bottom of the Allard intercooler to the stock radiator frame.



To keep an eye on my EGT, I installed a pyrometer probe into the EGR blanking plate. I used a skinny Auber Instruments probe instead of the larger VDO probe but I did my research and it turns out that all you need is a Type K pyrometer. Type K refers to a specific voltage/temperature curve; any probe of that type will work with the VDO gauge.



For the gauges, I went with the VDO 437-154 speedo and the Vision series pyro, coolant, and fuel gauges. After reading about Jack and others' problems with unreliable speedo readings, I did a little poking around and decided that the best way to get a reliable gauge was to use good wiring with a good ground. I installed a Hall effect sender on the LT230 and ran sleeved Ancor wire to the dash. For the power and ground, I built a unified harness out of more Ancor wire that tied in solidly with the factory harness.





Once I had everything wired up, I went out and measured a mile with the GPS and calibrated the gauge. For the first time in my Land Rover ownership history, I have a speedometer that is spot-on accurate at all speeds.



Unlike my old NAS truck, all of the gauges are uniform in style and backlighting.



After the cooling system was finalized, it was time to put the wings and bonnet on and get the truck on the road.

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  #49  
Old November 20th, 2014, 09:02 PM
chris snell chris snell is offline
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
After the truck was rolling, it was on to more minor tasks. In terms of time and headaches, 95% of the rebuild was finished in 50% of the time. The final 5% of the work took the other 50% of the time. Things that should take minutes took weeks. Weekends were consumed waiting on air shipments from the UK and trying to solve little problems that blocked many other tasks.

One such little project was the ignition tumbler. The keys I received with the truck were very worn-down and the ignition was quite difficult to turn. The problem is that the ignitions on the MOD trucks aren't the same as a ROW ignition. They don't have a steering column interlock and the ignition switch is a little different. After the first replacement was found to be incompatible, Brian Hall solved the puzzle and ordered me a new tumbler and key set.

I celebrated my new ignition by installing a key in the Snap-on handle like Han had on his truck. These were apparently made as a promotional item for Japanese customers but I got lucky and found one with an eBay saved search.



Once I had 500 miles on the truck, it was time to check the timing and adjust the valve clearance. We had a problem with bad metallurgy on one of the adjuster screws--it sheared as we were turning it--so we pulled the rocker arm to replace it. Imagine my surprise when we found this:



As you can see, some of the rocker arms were badly worn where they mated with the valve return guide caps. This was a Turner-remanufactured motor and this was a part that they surely pulled from a cratered head. I emailed them and they were a bit shitty with me for a while, trying to say that it was the result of incorrectly-set timing. We were super careful when we first set the timing, however, and I know that it was done correctly. We used a brand new Genuine belt and the improved flanged pulley that prevents belt slip-off. We also noted that the rocker assembly was not Genuine, for what it's worth. Turner eventually did the right thing and replaced the assembly with a good Genuine unit.

Another month goes by.

Finally get the front end tidied up. There was a manufacturing error in one of the front ears of the frame that prevented the bumper bolts from engaging with the captive plate on one side, so I had to build my own captive plate with slightly narrower spacing to make it work. Finally got the Mantec mounted with the Brownchurch. Got the Husky 10 mounted and the line spooled.



The original fuel sedimenter had a small air leak that caused fuel feed problems so I bought a nice glass/cast unit from Robert Davis on D90 Source. It's sweet. Unlike the original unit, you can look into this one and see when water/crap has collected.



Installed some Hella H4s and an ARB heavy duty harness. I replaced the stock Hella bulbs with 55W/100W. My headlights are now Hella bright. Also found some take-off headlight surrounds. I want to give these the clay glove treatment to see if I can make them look better.



Replaced the shitty Genuine black plastic expansion tank--the ones that always fail--with an Allisport aluminum tank. I would have preferred to stick with the original genuine metal tank from the 2.5NA but the hose diameters are incompatible.



When I look at my expansion tank and intercooler now, I think of this:


Fresh XZLs:



New eyebrows:



I wanted some 12V outlets in the cab for hooking up crap like phone chargers and the GPS. I found these neat little powdercoated cast aluminum enclosures from Mouser. I drilled them out and installed Blue Sea Systems marine power outlets. The box is powered by more Ancor wire that exits through a grommeted hole at the top and runs discretely under the lip of the tub bulkhead. I purposely used a slightly larger enclosure than necessary, in case I want to stuff another electrical gizmo in there, like the APRS transponder. I installed a smaller single-outlet box in the cargo area for the Engel.



I built a fridge platform that secures to the tub and stiffener trusses. Also made a cargo floor out of carpeted birch plywood. It's not ideal and I'll eventually redo this after a few trips, but it gets the basic job done.



Looking forward to many happy years with my rebuilt 110.

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  #50  
Old November 21st, 2014, 05:23 AM
dmarchand dmarchand is offline
David Marchand
KB1NYP
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 177
Nice call on the allisport tank. Looks like they have refined their design quite a bit. Mine is very boxy.

Have you thought about accommodations for the family, 3-4 seats (2 up front, 2 in the back for instance? Trying to figure out if the mod is a decent platform for adding seats in the back.
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