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  #51  
Old November 21st, 2014, 07:17 AM
dchapman dchapman is offline
Daniel Chapman
KJ4BXR
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 1,117

If you heat the plastic on those connectors where the wire goes in with a lighter they will shrink to the size of the wire. Just makes for a cleaner install.
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  #52  
Old November 21st, 2014, 08:28 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris snell
Once I had everything wired up, I went out and measured a mile with the GPS and calibrated the gauge. For the first time in my Land Rover ownership history, I have a speedometer that is spot-on accurate at all speeds.

I'm very jealous. My VDO still doesn't work properly.
Maybe my problem lies in the wiring job.
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  #53  
Old November 21st, 2014, 08:32 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
Great work all around, Chris.

As you said there are a lot of setbacks with these trucks. Be it because of the rarity of parts or the poor quality of them. Better to be patient as you have and get it rolling right.
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  #54  
Old November 21st, 2014, 09:06 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,068
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris snell

Unlike my old NAS truck, all of the gauges are uniform in style and backlighting.


You're giving me ideas. My gauges are terrible:


You can tell the tach was replaced at some point in my truck's life and it doesn't match the other gauges. Not only are the font and markings different, but the tach sits deeper than the other gauges. I thought about inserting a shim to flush out the tach, but I think it might actually look worse flushed out because the paint on the tach's bezel and the bezel shape don't match that of the other gauges.

My temp gauge is also a disaster. First of all, it stopped working. And the bezel's paint is worn off for whatever reason. I think this was a replacement as well, and it looks as though it came from the spare junk bin.

Your gauges are looking good. I'm not crazy about the VDO everywhere, but then again my clock says VDO on it:


And that never seemed to bother me.

Do you know if VDO makes your speedo but with an analog odometer? I like the analog odo more than the digital one.
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  #55  
Old November 21st, 2014, 11:25 AM
chris snell chris snell is online now
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSQ
I'm very jealous. My VDO still doesn't work properly.
Maybe my problem lies in the wiring job.

I just remembered that I made up a wiring diagram to plan out the design of the harness. For the wires coming from the harness bundle, I cut the ring connectors off and put on Ancor spades. There's a few places where three wires must come together onto one terminal on the gauge. To do this, I bundled two wires into one female spade connector and used an Ancor multi-stack connector to mate the double-wired spade and the single-wired spade onto the gauge's spade terminal.



This diagram does not show the sender wires. I just cut the ring connectors off of them and put on spades. In the diagram, the rectangles with the circles in them represent the illumination bulbs. The circles not in rectangles represent power for the gauge itself. Any wire coming from a harness bundle is part of the stock wiring harness. Inter-gauge connectors are part of my homemade harness.
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  #56  
Old November 21st, 2014, 11:46 AM
chris snell chris snell is online now
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
Do you know if VDO makes your speedo but with an analog odometer? I like the analog odo more than the digital one.

They don't. I don't know if VDO was the OEM of your Genuine speedo but there hasn't been an analog odometer version made in some time. As you know, even the 97 NAS trucks had VDO digital speedos.

I know how you must feel. Those factory temperature gauges are worthless and were modified by LR to give artificially low readings. I replaced mine in my old NAS truck and the replacement didn't match the stock stuff at all. Still, the numeric VDO is accurate enough that you can see the state of the thermostat just by watching the numbers.

Lots of NAS guys on D90 have replaced their gauges with VDO Vision so you could probably score an original tach and a replacement (lying) coolant gauge if you wanted to keep the look. Personally, I love the VDO. It just works.

The big bummer is that the 437-154D 85 MPH speedo hasn't been manufactured for at least a decade. I got incredibly lucky and found a guy who had one NIB. The current replacement part is a total joke and has a 145 MPH range:

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  #57  
Old November 21st, 2014, 12:27 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,068
Thanks for the info.

That's a bummer about the digital odometer.

Strange, but that 145 mph speedo might work out for me. For highway driving I usually cruise at about 70 mph, and I would actually like the fact that the needle would be pointing up with that speedometer. I think I'd rather have the needle pointing up rather than at 3 o'clock. My 110 is also geared low and I think it maxes (or at least revs and works very hard) at around 80-90 mph, so as the needle peaks up it sort of matches the car's performance.
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  #58  
Old November 21st, 2014, 02:02 PM
chris snell chris snell is online now
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmarchand
Have you thought about accommodations for the family, 3-4 seats (2 up front, 2 in the back for instance? Trying to figure out if the mod is a decent platform for adding seats in the back.

The MOD is a terrible family truck. While it came with dual 2-person bench seats in the back and each person had their own seatbelt, it's not a safe place to put kids. It's not comfortable, either. Even at stock height, it's a challenge to climb into the back. I pulled the seats out.

I have the LR4 for family trips. The 110 will be for me and Evan once he's old enough to come along.
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  #59  
Old March 3rd, 2017, 12:13 PM
chris snell chris snell is online now
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379




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  #60  
Old March 3rd, 2017, 02:02 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,068
Score!
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  #61  
Old March 6th, 2017, 05:31 AM
benlittle benlittle is offline
Ben Little
KE7BEN
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Salt Lake City
Posts: 387
wow, sweet!
____________________
110

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  #62  
Old March 6th, 2017, 05:39 AM
stu454 stu454 is offline
Stuart Ivie
KN4CBB
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 1,177
This is how I picture Chris now. Swap the blow for tires.

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  #63  
Old March 6th, 2017, 03:58 PM
greghirst greghirst is offline
Greg Hirst
KI6CQL
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 2,287
What a sweet set of tires-and 8.25 is even sweeter!
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  #64  
Old March 9th, 2017, 08:34 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
Brand new with nubs?

That's just obscene.
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  #65  
Old March 29th, 2017, 07:54 PM
chris snell chris snell is online now
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
I've been doing lots of work on the truck these past few weeks, trying to get it ready for a trip.

The most pressing issue was the doors. They were rusting out and they wouldn't stay shut no matter how many times I adjusted them.



I considered pulling them apart and having the frames galvanized but they were just too far gone so I ordered some new ones.

The new doors came with that cheap black oxide coating so I took them to a local paint shop to see if they could match the CARC military paint. That turned out to be a bigger project than I realized. Because I live in a small Kansas town, there is no local paint supply so the guys that were painting my parts had to wait for the supplier to come from Topeka on their weekly runs. It took weeks of back-and-forth efforts to get the paint "matched".

In reality, the paint could never match because the CARC paint is IR-absorptive. There is proper CARC paint available in the UK but there are countless variations on my truck's NATO green. Even if I did luck out and manage to import the correct color, no painter will touch that stuff because it's so toxic. So, I had to settle for an almost-match:



The tint is correct but the new paint is shinier than the IR-absorptive stuff. It's not noticeable in daylight when the truck is dirty but under the bright lights of my garage, it's pretty bad. Oh well.

On a positive note, I had the guys seam-seal the door frames and epoxy prime them before painting so these won't be rusting up any time soon.



I also had the scrapyard tailgate painted:



...and my new driver's side floor panel to match the new R380 tunnel cover:



I put in a new set of anti-burst latches and catches, too.


Now I have doors that close and open properly and stay shut once latched.



The next order of business was the transmission brake. It had never worked very well and seemed to be getting worse and worse. I wasn't sure if the spreader mechanism was just gummed up or if the shoes were gone or what, so I opened pulled it off and discovered that it was completely soaked in gear oil.



The LT230 rear output seal had gone and soaked the asbestos pad, which was also completely glazed-over. I pulled everything off and cleaned the spreader and replaced the output seal. I had to make a little tool out of a piece of angle iron to hold the output flange while I removed the flange nut but the repair was still very easy. The only real difficulty was removing the old seal. It took me a little while to figure out but the trick for removing them is to crease the inside metal seal with a few whacks of a chisel.

I installed a new felt washer and nyloc flange nut, then installed a fresh set of shoes and adjusted the spreader to get it just right. I can rest easily now because I have a solid trans brake that will hold fast on a steep hill.



As I reassembled my driveline, I took a look at my old driveshafts. I had a TW shaft in the front that was one inch too short--a transcription error on my part when I ordered it--and a rusty, crapped-out Allmakes shaft in the rear. Both shafts had a lot of desert miles on them and needed U-joints but it was the Allmakes shaft that drove me to replace them both.

Not that it's any news to anyone here but Allmakes parts are almost universally garbage. I can't count how many failed, failing, or rusted Allmakes parts I've pulled off this truck in the last few months. I no longer have any trust for this brand and I certainly wasn't about to undertake a long trip with this driveshaft.



So, I called up Tom Wood's and ordered two new shafts. Now I would have two properly-sized driveshafts that both use the ubiquitous 1310 U-joint. Three days later, I had the new shafts, a little UPS-mangled but otherwise fine:



With the driveline rehabbed, I was excited to finally drive my truck. Sadly, the truck wouldn't start. I suspected a fuel issue so I started poking around and determined that the lift pump was kaput. The truck had sat around all winter while I waited for my new doors and the diesel that was in the tank when winter started was already pretty old. By the time I got around to driving it, the bad diesel and lack of use had destroyed the rubber diaphragm in the lift pump. I ordered a new one from LRDirect and it was here in three days.

Once I had it installed, I took the truck out on a spring run around the Kansas countryside to visit some of our more prominent topographic features:

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  #66  
Old March 29th, 2017, 08:26 PM
chris snell chris snell is online now
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
As I drove back to the house, I noticed that my fuel tank seemed to be draining more quickly than normal. When I pulled into the garage, I saw diesel spilling onto the ground from the passenger side of the motor compartment. I opened the bonnet and saw that my injector spill lines were dry-rotted and had split, dumping fuel onto the block. It's a good thing that this truck is diesel and that the exhaust manifold was on the other side. Yikes.



Surprise, surprise. These were Allmakes lines. I tossed them and ordered a set of the Genuines from LRDirect. You can tell the shitty lines from the good lines by the style of the brass fittings that join them together. The good ones have flared fittings; the shitty do not. The shitty ones are made with super crappy rubber. These Allmakes were less than three years old.

As I was repairing these, I noticed that most of the rubber isolators on my air filter bracket had failed:



Want to guess who manufactured that filter bracket? Yep.

I ordered some new Genuine isolators and installed them. I have to say, of all the shitty jobs on a Defender, changing out these isolators ranks up there with installing a new steering box. It's a total pain in the ass. You need tiny hands and a rubber glove with a little magnet in the fingertip to hold the nut and washer.

After fixing the fueling system, it was on to the rear drum brakes. My brakes had been feeling soft for a while and every time I bled them, there was a little air in the rears. There weren't any noticeable leaks so I assume that the cylinders were sucking in air somehow.

First, I had to remove the drums. This was a big pain in the ass because they were completely frozen to the hubs by rust and years of heat and asbestos dust. I spent days soaking them with PB Blaster and beating them with a brass hammer to no avail. I also tried the trick of putting a fastener in the little pull-holes on the side but that didn't help, either.



At last, I discovered that I could remove them by prying back the backing plate and getting a crowbar behind the lip of the drums. I had them off in short order. The cylinders weren't looking so hot.



The shoes were totally shot, worn down to the rivets:



It is a brotherhood of men who have rebuilt a Land Rover drum brake. It is a total pain in the ass. The springs that hold the shoes together are unbelievably stout. Mine were even tougher because I was using new springs:



The manual, as usual, is laughably vague about the re-mounting procedures so you're on your own. There's no YouTube video or forum post for this, either. It took me hours but I finally figured out the trick: install the lower springs first, then install one side of the upper springs, then mount the shoes, then use the Force to pull the loose side of the upper spring into the tiny and concealed hole in the back side of the shoe. You may have to bend the hook of the spring out a little bit to make it so that it will be able to pop in.



You might notice that these are not Genuine brake cylinders. I had ordered these brake parts years ago and they were Allmakes. Sure as shit, I opened the box to discover that they were made in China. What a disappointment but at this point, not surprising. The good news is that the cylinders themselves are very easy to change so I will swap them out for Genuine if they give me problems, which they probably will.

I put a new set of drums on, taking care to put some high-heat copper anti-sieze around the mating surface between drum and hub.

While I was in there, I took an opportunity to go over the hubs. It wasn't pretty: the hubs were filled with rust and some very old grease:



I decided to rebuild them with fresh bearings and races.



Finally, my truck has rebuilt hubs and new brakes in all four corners:

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  #67  
Old March 30th, 2017, 06:06 AM
kevinp kevinp is offline
Kevin Price KJ6NII
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 275
Bit by bit that truck is going to be brand new. I feel your pain on drum brakes, by the way. If I never change another set of drums, that's fine with me.
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  #68  
Old March 30th, 2017, 08:55 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,068
Looking good.
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  #69  
Old March 30th, 2017, 10:31 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,487
Man does this take me back. I think I've done all those jobs on my 110 at one time or another.

You're not wrong about the drum brakes. You start into it thinking that there's an elegant technique you're missing and then when you finally start jamming pry bars you realize this was just going to be gangster from the beginning. A word of caution on the shoes for the rear brakes or the t-case: Usually, once they've been contaminated by gear oil, they're through. Even if you clean them with a strong solvent they will always remain a little slick when warm. It's best to just toss them and get a fresh set, especially considering how cheap they are.

Don't sweat your mismatched doors. The nice thing about ExMods is that they're simple enough that you can tackle all the problems, but like any Land Rover, you'll never be able to stay on top of all of it or make the truck perfect. It's best to have an un-fixable cosmetic flaw that allows you to just be satisfied with a truck that looks decent and runs pretty well. Trying to get a Land Rover 100% is just too maddening. Always slightly beyond reach...

As far as Allmakes goes, you're not wrong there either. But, as we all know, the green oval is no assurance of quality. For me, it's just been a matter of learning which generics or OEM brands work for which parts. I've used a lot of Britpart with good success along with TRW and Delphi. Trevor at Rovah Farm has been vary good at rating the quality among the options.

My 110 is due for some love. I still dream at night of having working turn signals some day...
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  #70  
Old March 30th, 2017, 11:59 AM
RyanLoehr RyanLoehr is offline
Ryan Loehr
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Kansas City, Missouri
Posts: 70
My in-laws live 45 minutes northwest of Manhattan. We head back there several times a year, driving through Manhattan.

If you ever need something from the Kansas City area, let me know and I'd be happy to drop it off for you if the timing works out. Catch is it would have to fit in an LR4.
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  #71  
Old March 30th, 2017, 12:53 PM
benlittle benlittle is offline
Ben Little
KE7BEN
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Salt Lake City
Posts: 387
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSQ
You start into it thinking that there's an elegant technique you're missing and then when you finally start jamming pry bars you realize this was just going to be gangster from the beginning.

This made me laugh because it's so true.
____________________
110

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  #72  
Old March 31st, 2017, 07:43 AM
chris snell chris snell is online now
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
Thanks, guys. The drum shoes for the t-case and rear brakes are new all around. The rears were completely worn-out and the t-case brake was indeed oil-soaked and glazed.

Somehow, I ended up with an extra set of drum brake shoes. If anybody needs a set, they're yours.
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  #73  
Old March 31st, 2017, 07:55 AM
chris snell chris snell is online now
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
A few other little things...

My fuel lockers were in bad shape. When I took the truck on the cold weather shake-down run back in '14, I forgot about the water cans in the lockers. I was in Salmon, ID when the temperature dropped to -15F one night and my cans swelled up. Amazingly, the cans themselves never breached or leaked but one of the lockers got bent:





The latch catches were rusted and one of them sheared, so I secured it with safety wire. I took another couple of trips with only one working latch but I finally got around to replacing them last week.

I found some nice toggles on Amazon and riveted them on:



As you can see, the military paint is flaking off in sheets. When this truck was refreshed during the Tithonus program, the contractor did a re-spray but I don't think they did any prep at all. It's flaking all over and there's lots of overspray everywhere. Like Jack said, all of these warts make it a lot easier to accept the truck as it is and to stop sweating every tree scratch or paint chip.
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  #74  
Old April 8th, 2017, 11:19 AM
chris snell chris snell is online now
Christopher Snell
NW5W
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,379
Has anybody tried these?

http://www.colbyvalve.com/

The "permanent valves" look interesting.
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  #75  
Old April 8th, 2017, 03:08 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,068
I haven't tried those, but I don't like the idea of them. They're "hard" valves, so they're likely to break if they ever rub against something on the trail.

To me, if those Colby Valves are usable at all, it's as trail replacements. There are, however, different valve kits out there for inserting rubber/flexible valves from the outside of the rim:


I think I like these better than those Colby Valves.
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