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  #26  
Old June 25th, 2004, 12:10 PM
AlanB
 
Posts: n/a
Yes, 10 speed cluster, pretty insane. I remember my first real racing bike, a celeste green Bianchi I bought in 1980, which I still have, probably one of the very few in the US at that time, it had 10 total speeds. Now you can get 20 and 30 speeds with a triple, crazy.

John, I hear you on the large rear cogs, I too wouldn't dare put anything over 21 in the back for fear of being ridiculed, but sometimes I could have sure used one.

With all this bike talk, I'll have to dig into my old parts box this weekend and post some old campy parts porn.

I think Lance will take it in the end but its going to be close.
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  #27  
Old June 25th, 2004, 12:36 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,160
When I first started riding and racing, it was really common to see five-speed freewheels on others' machines. I think the rear spacing on these was 120mm but I can't remember for sure. The six-speed hubs were relatively new then, and I remember all of the bike catalogs had both the 120 and 126mm spacing listed for the various frames. So I'm guessing the six-speed was relatively new.

Then I thought I was hot stuff because I had a SEVEN speed. It was a Regina that still used the 126mm spacing, but the cogs were spaced closer together and required a narrow chain. I think I used a silver Sedisport, but again my memory is foggy.

Then eight speeds came out. Then nines. Then 10's. Unbelievable. I had some time to kill and went into a bike shop to check out the newest stuff and I saw the latest chains. I can't believe how thin they are now. I don't know the hub spacing on the latest hubs, but the ones I saw looked very wide.

What's crazy now too is that I see 11- and 12-tooth cogs around. I guess modern chainrings are smaller now than the 52/42 or 53/39 "standard" rings in my day, because I can't see how any non-pro rider could turn a 53x11 at a reasonable cadence.

Please do post some Campy porn if you get the chance. I love Campy stuff as much as I love HK stuff or Snap-on stuff. All I can say is, this had better not be a pic of you:

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  #28  
Old June 25th, 2004, 05:01 PM
AlanB
 
Posts: n/a
Sorry John, that ain't me, I'm dorky but not that dorky.

Here's my circa 1980 Bianchi columbus sl frame that I had restored a few years back and converted into my bagel bike. Mix of campy parts, modolo brakes, bombproof philwood hubs and 36 spoke wheels from a touring bike, huret long cage rear deraillleur, jandd rack. Everything is 15 to 20+ years old except the salsa stem and mtb handlebar, tires, seat. brake levers, and pedals.

An old school Gianni Motta SLX with mostly super record, also restored the frame a few years back.

Some old campy porn.

My old yeti hardtail, circa 1993 or 4.

And a Klein Mantra, circa 1998.
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  #29  
Old June 25th, 2004, 05:18 PM
koby koby is offline
Craig Kobayashi
KG6CK
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Orange, CA
Posts: 442
Holy shit! Nice Yeti! That frame looks pristine

I'd love to take that frame and go back to 1994 with that.
  • Remove Raceface cranks in exchange for Topline or Cook Brothers cranks
  • Remove Ringle bottle cages
  • install Deore XT cage pedals with toe clips
  • put the Accutrax fork back on!
  • remove the Aheadset system for an old school Chris King headset
  • Control stem and seatpost
  • Onza bar ends on a set of Answer Hyperlite handlebars

I broke a Yeti ARC frame in 1995. Was one of the saddest of my mountain biking days. Definitely one of my favorite frames to ride.

If you ever want to sell that Yeti, let me know!
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  #30  
Old June 25th, 2004, 05:33 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,160


Oh man. Is it just me, or does Campy just not make them like that any more? That Super Record crank is just bad ass.

The thread markings on the end of the crank are so sweet. Do they even make Italian, English, and French threaded parts any more? Or is everything standardized now?

Thanks for sharing the Campy porn. Makes me want to dust off my beloved yellow Eddy Merckx and snap some pics.
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  #31  
Old June 25th, 2004, 05:41 PM
AlanB
 
Posts: n/a
Thanks Koby. Sorry the frames a keeper. Cook Bros. cranks kick butt, I have always wanted a pair but never got around to it. The Yeti ARC is another awsome frame. The Yeti Utlimate frame is a tank, its all cromoly and is heavy, but it will last forever.

Oooh you have an Eddy Merckx, get home John and snap some pics. Don't know if everything is standardized, probably. Those were the days.
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  #32  
Old June 25th, 2004, 08:22 PM
curtis
 
Posts: n/a
Damn Alan - that collection of yours is a trip back through time. Especially looking at your Yeti & Klein bikes. Do you realize that you may possibly have the last remaining pair of intact Spinergy wheels?

I had a pair back in the day. I guess I got about a good six months out of them before a rock hopped up and tossed my derailleur cage into the spokes. I actually liked them though. My only real compaint was tire changes and dealing with that stupid valve extender that always seemed to break.

Love that old Campy stuff. Too cool.
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  #33  
Old June 25th, 2004, 08:52 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,160
I'll try to remember to take the shop camera home this weekend and snap some pics of my old bike and some other cycling stuff.

Speaking of old school cycling stuff, I'm digging this wool jersey:



You can get that jersey here:

http://www.vintagevelos.com/trainers1.html

Break out the Woolite!
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  #34  
Old June 25th, 2004, 08:55 PM
AlanB
 
Posts: n/a
The Klein with the spinergy's has very few on and off-road miles on it, its practically brand new. I pretty much quit riding after I bought the Klein. I got the spinergy's when it was the in thing to have, but did not realize what fragile pos they really were, but they look cool. I also have an old Vitus and Woodrup in storage somewhere.

If you really want to reminice, here's a great site that brings back some BMX memories:

http://www.vintagebmx.com/
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  #35  
Old June 25th, 2004, 09:03 PM
AlanB
 
Posts: n/a
Sweet jersey, its just as stylish back then as it would be today.
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  #36  
Old June 25th, 2004, 11:42 PM
curtis
 
Posts: n/a
To put aft before fore: those jersey suck major ass comared to the modern synthetic/lycra mix. Sure - they kept the rider warm better on colder rides, but don't get caught in the tailwind of a rider with one. Talk about smellin' like crap! There is nothing like the audacious odor of a rider with a wool jersey. The problem is twofold: you cannot wash them like synthetics without deterioration, and they retain odors as well as they retain heat.

Now to the vintage BMX stuff: That is how I got started in my love of cycling in about...maybe 1976. I raced until about 1984 when the flame died out. Now my oldest is racing at 5 years old. I am absolutely blown away at what "old school" frames bring. Latest price check on a looptail (1980-1982) SE Racing Floval Flyer Cruiser or PK Ripper is between $1500-$2500 for FRAME ALONE!! Granted, you can get modern "rip offs" for cheaper, but that is what the originals bring.

BTW - Bennett has raced nine races in the last month and brought home nine trophies: 3 1st, 3 2nds. & 3 3rds. To add to our collection of bikes I just bought a Redline cruiser yesterday with Flight cranks, S&M bars, and the works
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  #37  
Old June 25th, 2004, 11:56 PM
koby koby is offline
Craig Kobayashi
KG6CK
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Orange, CA
Posts: 442
Who cares how it functions, it just plain looks cool!
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  #38  
Old June 26th, 2004, 12:03 AM
curtis
 
Posts: n/a
Craig, I must be missing something here. I never noticed $G stuff on your rig
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  #39  
Old June 26th, 2004, 12:05 AM
koby koby is offline
Craig Kobayashi
KG6CK
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Orange, CA
Posts: 442
Quote:
Originally Posted by koby
Who cares how it functions, it just plain looks cool!

Funny, the same thing can be said about your Disco.

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  #40  
Old June 26th, 2004, 06:13 AM
curtis
 
Posts: n/a
True...true...
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  #41  
Old June 28th, 2004, 08:27 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,160
I snapped some pics of my old bike. It was nasty. The poor little thing was covered in dust and some light corrosion. Oh man. It was sad. I wiped it off a little before snapping pics, but a real cleaning would have taken all day. So I just gave her a quick once over. Anyway, here's a pic of the bike:



The bike looks dated by today's racy standards. The tubing is Columbus SLX:



The decal is obviously shredded. For some reason, the SLX decal wasn't covered by the frame's clear coat. There is also a very faint Columbus imprint on the back of the head tube, right below the pump peg:



The fork crown is a Cinelli I believe, and is the "aero" type:



At least it was "aero" back in the late 80's. The seatstay bridge is also vintage aero:



The frame is mostly yellow with a chrome right chainstay and a white panel on the downtube:



This is my my second favorite paint scheme for the Eddy Merckx frames (my favorite is the orange one with the purple panel on the down tube and "EDDY MERCKX" in yellow letters):



My down tube is white:



The letters are black and are bordered with some pimp gold trim. The Belgian Champion stripes border the white panel:



One thing I dig about this bike is that Eddy Merckx's victories adorn this bike. For example, the frame is yellow, presumably to symbolize Merckx's victories in the Tour de France. The Belgian stripes on the downtube also signify Merckx's multiple Belgian national champion victories. The seat tube also has some other trophies:



The yellow-colored map of France obviously signifies Merckx's five Tour victories. The rainbow stripes on the seat tube signify Merckx's world road race championships. There is also a pink map of Italy with the same stripes:



I believe Merckx won five Giro's as well as five Tours. Just unreal. The front of the rainbow stripes show Merckx's successful hour record in Mexico City:



The front and rear dropouts are, of course, Campagnolo:





You can tell by the set screw on the rear dropout that the alignment on my frame wasn't perfect. With the left set screw set at minimum and the right out just slightly, my rear tire alignment was perfect.

You can also see the "15" on the smallest cog. This was my racing freewheel when I was a junior.
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  #42  
Old June 28th, 2004, 08:46 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,160
The frame is a 54cm size, measured center-to-center.



You can tell in that pic that my frame was a little too big for me. The top tube length is perfect for me, but I think the frame was 1cm too tall. I bought that frame in high school, and I thought I would grow some. I don't think I did. when I sat on my bike on Sunday, it still felt as though it fit me. The only area where I have grown is around the waist. Were I buying another bike today with a level top tube, I would probably buy a 53cm frame.

Unlike Lance Armstrong and Tyler Hamilton and many other of today's riders, I favored having the hooks of my bars parallel with the top tube:



I always intended to cut off about 10mm or 15mm from the ends of the hooks to lessen weight, but I never did.

The brake levers are the Campy "C-Record" models, which were Campy's first "aero" brake levers. I also routed the cables inside the bars:



I also favored Criterium-style bars:



I'm not even sure Criterium-style bars are offered today. My bars are 40cm wide:



The stem is a Cinelli 1R, which I considered to be very sleek and elegant looking, as there was no visible gap in the stem. The stem was tightened using a single bolt on the stem's underside:



It was popular in the 80's for bike makers to "pantograph" many of the components:



My saddle was the Selle Italia "Turbo" model:



Compared to today's thin saddles, the Turbo looks huge by comparison. My saddle is beat up from spills:



The seatpost is a Campy Super Record, size 27.2mm:



I would think today's seatposts are standardized, but I really have no idea.
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  #43  
Old June 28th, 2004, 08:57 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,160
Here's a pic of the drivetrain:



The crank is a Campy Super Record:



I'm sure I ran a 53/42 chainring combo when I was racing, but this crank is fitted with a 52/42. I might have swapped chainrings with somebody when I stopped riding seriously, but I can't remember who has my beloved 53T chainring now.

Note the absence of dust covers on the cranks:



Nobody in the pro peloton ran dust covers, so of course I removed my dust covers. Note that the winged hub Campy logo is engraved and not laser etched. I really wish Campy would go back to the engraving. It's one of the things that separated Campagnolo from ShimaNO.

The crank arms are 172.5mm:



This was probably the most ill-fitting part of my bike. Why a sprinter like me wanted 172.5mm cranks is beyond me. I was suffering from the "more is better" mentality. What a sucker.

The front derailleur is a Campy Super Record:



Here's the rear derailleur:



I believe this derailleur is all aluminum or steel, and there is no titanium in it. I'm thinking this because I remember the C-Record derailleur actually weighed more than the Super Record derailleur. I think it was 180g vs. 201g.

The C-Record derailleur had ball bearing pulleys. It was a very sweet derailleur. It might have been the last of the true parallelogram designs, although I'm not sure. All I know is that Campy's current designs are all slant-parallelogram designs. I hate that. There isn't any slant parallelogram design that looks this good:



The shifters were on the downtube, and were the friction type:



My training wheels were 32-spoke Mavic MA40's:



I looked for my racing wheels, but they were nowhere to be found. I think I gave them away many years ago.
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  #44  
Old June 28th, 2004, 09:09 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,160
The brakes, like the rest of the components, were a mix of C-Record and Super Record. The levers were C-Record:



These levers look awesome but they are actually very uncomfortable. The calipers were C-Record I believe:



I'm not sure though. Those could be Super Record. But my recollection is that Super Record brakes had the block lettering instead of Campy script. Though not clearly visible, there's some ShimaNO action on those brakes. The pads are Dura-Ace pads:



The Campy pad material was too hard and really scratched up the anodizing on the rims. The Campy pads also had transverse grooving on them and collected a lot of trash on wet rides. So I cut up some Dura-Ace pads and inserted them into the Campy shoes. Oh the horror.

The Campy brakes also allowed something really cool. I don't know if modern brakes with their ergopower shifting can do this, but I hope so because it was fucking cool. On the back of the caliper is a black rubber steering stop:



Just turn the bars all to way to the right until the steering stop touches the down tube:



Tripod the bike on the front wheel, handlebars, and left brake lever:



The bike will balance perfectly:



The bike is actually really stable in that position. After club rides we would head over to Ernie's Pro Bikes to hang out, and we would all park our bikes in this fashion outside Ernie's. It was cool as shit. No kickstand needed. I also used this when fixing a rear flat in the field.
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  #45  
Old June 28th, 2004, 09:24 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,160
Here are some uniform shots:





I think those jerseys were from 1986, when Velo Club La Grange and Ernie's Pro Bikes merged clubs. The jerseys are littered with pin holes from racing numbers, which I think looks bad ass:



In 1987, Ernie's Pro Bikes and Velo Club La Grange went their separate ways and we went with this jersey:



And here is my old skinsuit:



Of course I didn't even bother trying any of these on. I KNOW they wouldn't fit me today. I used to have a 28" waist and weighed 135 lbs. I'm a fatass today.

Well, that's my weekend trip through memory lane. Sorry for the numerous pics and slow page loading.
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  #46  
Old June 28th, 2004, 09:45 PM
koby koby is offline
Craig Kobayashi
KG6CK
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Orange, CA
Posts: 442
Bad ass! the bike looks used, but still very clean.

27.2 is still the standard road seatpost standard.

Finally, I can't believe you would put Doorachee pads on those brakes!
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  #47  
Old June 29th, 2004, 12:17 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,160
Yeah, I should have ground off the "Dura-Ace" from those pads. I spent a few hours grinding the weenie-shaped Dura-Ace pads to fit the Campy shoes. I should have gone a little farther and ground off the Shimano name as well.

I was just thinking. Whatever happened to Campy tools? Those were nice. That entire Campy tool kit used to come in this bitchin brown leather suitcase. The Campy tool kit was the pride of every bike shop. But I believe Campy doesn't offer its tools any longer.

I searched like crazy for my old Campy cone wrenches, but I think I gave them away years ago. My bad.
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  #48  
Old June 29th, 2004, 07:17 AM
AlanB
 
Posts: n/a
Very cool bike John! I know what you mean about giving stuff away, that Campy tool kit was not cheap then and probably worth some coin today. I gave away my PK Ripper, apparently worth some coin today too!
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  #49  
Old June 29th, 2004, 08:49 AM
curtis
 
Posts: n/a
Campy still does make tools and the sweet leather wrap as well.

Alan - if your PK was a "looptail" circa 1980-82 and in as good of condition as the rest of your bikes, it would be worth $2000-$2500 for the frame alone. Maybe more with an urgent buyer.

You are probably not going to believe this, but I used to work with Perry Kramer when I was with Giant. Great guy - very down to earth. I think he is still the Giant rep for San Diego.
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  #50  
Old June 29th, 2004, 09:11 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,160
Good to know that Campy still makes tools. Those tools were really sweet. Not Snap-on by any means, but still very sweet. I cringe every time I see those Park tools. What pieces of shit. I can't believe those Park tools are considered the standard "pro" bike mechanic tools. Yuck.

When I was snapping pics of my bike last Sunday, I couldn't help but imagine which Snap-on tool could be used on this or that fastener. I put together a mental dream list of Snap-on tools for wrenching on that bike.
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