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  #1  
Old February 4th, 2005, 04:53 PM
david david is offline
David Woo
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
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2005 Omega porn

Have a look at some new Omega products for 2005.
http://www.equationoftime.com/forums...cgi?read=90145

DW
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  #2  
Old February 4th, 2005, 05:26 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
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Location: Torrance, CA
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Ooh la la. Not bad at all.

In this pic the crystal looks domed:



Hard to say for sure though. But I hope it's domed.

The "He" is also a nice touch.

I dig the all-black version. My main hesitation though is that the watch looks a little small (at least in the pics). But if it's big enough in real life it would be a sweet watch.
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  #3  
Old February 4th, 2005, 09:57 PM
david david is offline
David Woo
 
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Text says two sizes, 42 and 45.5 mm, plenty big for those rover wrists

Don't show them to Ho.
DW
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  #4  
Old February 4th, 2005, 11:11 PM
hochung hochung is offline
Ho Chung
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david, perhaps too late?
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  #5  
Old February 5th, 2005, 09:30 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Sweet. I'll keep an eye out for this watch and see how it looks in person, i.e., how it compares to the Submariner.
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  #6  
Old February 5th, 2005, 10:26 AM
hochung hochung is offline
Ho Chung
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matches



?????
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  #7  
Old February 5th, 2005, 10:34 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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No, Ho. I think you have it backwards.

This:



matches this:



Face it. It's reality.
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  #8  
Old February 5th, 2005, 02:46 PM
KevinNY
 
Posts: n/a
My name is Kevin, and I'm an Omegaholic.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg omega back.JPG (133.1 KB, 558 views)
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  #9  
Old February 5th, 2005, 07:34 PM
hochung hochung is offline
Ho Chung
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Thumbs up

damn junkies!!
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  #10  
Old February 5th, 2005, 07:48 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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That's so typical from a Rolex lover. Pah!

OK, what about this:





matching this:





"FLIGHT-QUALIFIED BY NASA FOR ALL MANNED SPACE MISSIONS: THE FIRST WATCH WORN ON THE MOON"

and

"RIGBY'S SPECIAL: 416 BORE FOR BIG GAME"

both have a similar ring to them. Don't you agree?
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  #11  
Old February 5th, 2005, 07:57 PM
KevinNY
 
Posts: n/a
Ahh, English express rifle porn. Interesting rifle, appears to be opened up to the rear to accomodate the 416, see how the extractor doesn't reach the rear bridge now? The thumb cut on the left rail is closed up as well.

Rolex is for amatuers.
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  #12  
Old February 5th, 2005, 07:59 PM
hochung hochung is offline
Ho Chung
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someday...

someday you guys will wise up and join me.
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  #13  
Old February 5th, 2005, 08:21 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Yeah, that Rigby's is all fucked up. That top shot of the action isn't bad, but here are some other pics of it:

http://www.mcdonaldsgunshop.com/rifles/rigby4.htm

The description says "Mauser 98" action, but that's clearly not a Mauser. It's the forerunner of the current CZ550 action. I don't know the exact model designation of that action, but it's somewhere between the ZKK602 and the current CZ550 action. That action looks exactly like the action on my beater CZ550, but the bolt sleeve is different. My bolt sleeve is very conical in shape.

I agree with you that the action looked opened up on the rear receiver bridge. Why Rigby's did this is a mystery, because the CZ action is more than long enough to house the .416 Rigby with room to spare and ejection doesn't seem to be an issue at all.

This is my holy grail Rigby's:



Speaking of Magnum Mausers, there is still hope. Check out this outfit:

http://www.golmatic.de/Waffen_EN/waffen_en.htm

Those have to be the nicest copycat Mauser's I've seen. And this firm will even build them with the single square bridge, thumb slot, military trigger, original flanged bolt sleeve, and even copy the Rigby's-style bottom metal. Even the copycat Rigby's cocking piece aperture is a stock item for these guys. I'm guessing too that they would be willing to machine in the charger slot and the bullet tip slot as well. If they did that then the only thing missing would be the "WAFFENFABRIK MAUSER - OBERNDORF a/N" on the side.
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  #14  
Old February 5th, 2005, 08:45 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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And here's some .416 porn:





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  #15  
Old February 5th, 2005, 09:05 PM
hochung hochung is offline
Ho Chung
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  #16  
Old February 5th, 2005, 09:08 PM
hochung hochung is offline
Ho Chung
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  #17  
Old February 5th, 2005, 09:14 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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.700 Nitro? A mere 1000-grain projectile?

Sheeeit. You want big? I mean fucking BIG? Get yourself a 4-Bore:



(Please, no John Holmes jokes.)
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  #18  
Old February 5th, 2005, 09:17 PM
hochung hochung is offline
Ho Chung
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a - HA! size does matter eh? LOL
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  #19  
Old February 5th, 2005, 09:20 PM
hochung hochung is offline
Ho Chung
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rob, you like cats?



we can shoot him .. right now... or we can let that lion decide... how he's gonna die.
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  #20  
Old February 6th, 2005, 08:42 AM
KevinNY
 
Posts: n/a
I think your right John, the bolt handle and shroud is all wrong on that rifle. The second one you posted is a beauty though, true classic english express style.
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  #21  
Old February 6th, 2005, 11:16 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
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Omega and Rigby?

I don't think I'll ever quite understand how you can equate those. We've failed to resolve it in the past and I don't forsee it anytime in the near future.
At least I've learned to just let it be

but regardless,
as we discussed, I still want the take down .405





with lyman peep of course:



I'm seeing you and kevin and I in the bush with three of the all time classic safari rounds: .35 Wheelen, .416 Rigby and .405 Winchester.

awsome.

On another note,
It's a comfort to have attainable tastes for once.

you'll have to suffer the impossibility of your rifles and I my shotguns.

oh well.
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  #22  
Old February 7th, 2005, 06:08 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Man, spoken like a true TAG owner. One day, you will understand.

The idea of a "classic" African round is the subject of wide debate. Certainly, the .30-06 Springfield and .270 Winchester have been used widely and still are used widely in Africa, both by visiting hunters and by the locals. They have probably been used far more than the .275 Rigby or .416 Rigby. There is little doubt that the .404 Jeffery was and is used far more widely than the .416 Rigby. And probably the .458 Win Mag is still the most widely used heavy in Africa.

But for me the .30-06, .270, and .458 just don't qualify as "classic" African rounds. Perhaps it is because they are American calibers. I'm not sure why. The .404 Jeffery is a beautiful round, and has the English pedigree, but it still doesn't have the magic for me.

What is "classic" is difficult to define, but my definition would probably that a "classic" round evokes romantic images of Africa inside of me. Another definition might be that a famous hunter used the round and made it famous and endowed with a certain charm and charisma, such as Harry Selby with his .416 Rigby that served him well for 40 years of professional hunting, or James Sutherland with his pair of Westley Richards .577 doubles, or W.D.M. Bell with his famous .275 Rigby.

For me, these are the "classic" African rounds, the rounds that make me dream of going to Africa and the rounds I dream of owning and shooting:

light repeater: .275 Rigby with 173-grain solids and softs
light-medium repeater: .318 Westley Richards
medium repeater: .375 Holland & Holland with 300-grain solids and softs
heavy repeater: .416 Rigby
heavy double: .470 Nitro Express
super heavy double: .577 Nitro Express
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  #23  
Old February 7th, 2005, 07:08 PM
stansell
 
Posts: n/a
Ho,
that picture of the kitty is fine, so long that view is from a rifle scope at 800 yds and lots of ammo.

Bush hunting with a cat that big holds no attraction whatsoever.
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  #24  
Old February 7th, 2005, 07:17 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,490
Hey, I wear the TAG but I don't claim it to be anything more than a serviceable watch. I don't have any misconceived delusions of grandeur.

My next watch is an IWC Chronograph Automatic or a Breitling Ocean Automatic. After that I hope to graduate to something really special. And it aint gonna be no plastic faced james bond buzz aldrin got it with a decoder ring with my boxtops at costco.

But I was trying not to go there.
Where I AM trying to go is the .405.

You cannot deny it classic status.

I won't allow it.
The .405 not only has proven itself on all of the African game but it has the very qualities which make it an inseperable part of the Safari mystique. That being that it has a direct association with a great gun and a great hunter. The .405 is synonymous with the 1895 Winchester and the man best known for carrying it: TR.

Now I know it's generic as hell to idolize TR, but I can't help it. He and Kermit were great hunters in a time of many greats. They understood the outdoors, sport and adventure and they were men of intellect and experience.

Don't try to twist this around and make it some sort of Connecticut vs London thing. I didn't say shit about no ought six or .270 so don't infer it.

This is .405, .416 and .35 wheelen.
Nothing else is on the table.

There are plenty of classics (.375 H&H and 7mm Mag) but they bore the hell out of me. Those are the three rounds worth talking about for repeaters.
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  #25  
Old February 7th, 2005, 09:58 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,157
I don't deny that the .405 is a classic cartridge. But can the .405 reasonably be classified a classic African cartridge? I don't think so. I think that would be a stretch.

First of all, who used the .405 in Africa and on what? Sure, Theodore Roosevelt immediately comes to mind. But T.R.'s battery consisted of, I believe, a Springfield chambered for .30-06/220, an 1895 Winchester chambered for .405, and a H&H sidelock ejector chambered for .500/.450 Nitro. In other words, his .405 was his medium, not his heavy. T.R. was known to refer to the .405 as his "lion medicine" and not his "heavy" or his "elephant medicine". I can't remember offhand, but I believe Kermit's heavy was a double in .450 3 1/4" Nitro. Kermit didn't use the .405 as his heavy either. Here's a pic of Kermit & T.R. sitting on a buff:



Both men are armed with their doubles, and not their .405's. Here's T.R. standing near an elephant he tagged:



Again, we see his .500/.450 and not his .405. Here's a pic of T.R. with a black rhino that he shot:



Finally, we see his .405. And here's that pic you posted of T.R. tagging a charging leopard:



So while it is incontrovertible that T.R. used a .405 in Africa, it was not his heavy. It was, rather, his medium. In 1909, the .375 H&H had not yet been invented, so the .405 was as good a medium as any available to T.R. at the time. The same is true for other mediums like the .338-06, .35 Whelen, .350 Rem Mag, .358 Norma Mag, .350 Rigby, and .318 Westley Richards. None of these rounds existed at the time T.R. chose the .405 as his medium.

The only other .405 user that I know of offhand was Charles Cottar, the early American professional hunter in Africa and the genesis of the famous Cottar clan of professional hunters. Charles Cottar used his .405 as his heavy, and he ended up being tagged by a rhino:

"I had asked young Calvin Cottar, aged twenty-two, on the day he took out his first client, why he wanted to be a professional hunter. Brought up in Glen Cottar's tented safari camp, studying correspondence courses, shooting meat at thirteen for his father's safari camps, Calvin is determined to be 'one of the few fourth-generation professional hunters in Africa'. Calvin told me his great-grandfather explained it all as he lay dying in the bush in 1940. Charles Cottar, the first American white hunter, began hunting as a boy of eight in Cedar County, Iowa, paying for his bullets by selling mink pelts for 15 cents apiece. Never able to give up the outdoor life, he was killed hunting rhinoceros twenty-nine years after he came to Africa. Already gored by a buffalo, knocked down by an elephant, three times mauled by leopard, partially paralysed by a stroke, at sixty-seven Charles Cottar was unable to get his lever-action .405 Winchester up in time to stop the charging rhino, although he hit it twice. Crushed as the rhino fell on him, bleeding to death from a severed femoral artery, with his last words he stopped his son from raising a canvas to protect him from the hot sun, 'No. I want to see the sky.'"

Now one case is hardly conclusive, and numerous hunters have been tagged while using various rifles of all weights, but thus far I see the .405 as a round that Roosevelt wisely used as his medium, and a round that Charles Cottar found wanting against his last game animal.

I can think of no other famous hunter who used the .405 in Africa. So, at least from my way of looking at things, that is the first strike against the .405's being a classic African cartridge.

The second strike against the .405, again, as I see it, is the fact that it is not a true heavy and not suited for African game. Not all classic African rounds have to be heavies. The .375 is what I consider to be a classic African round, but it is definitely not a heavy. But the .375 is a great cartridge with a distinct purpose: versatility. The .375 was conceived as a universal rifle, one with which the hunter could use against any all game that roamed the earth. This task it performs admirably. Gemsbok/kudu/eland one day and elephant the next, the .375 does it all. In fact, despite almost 100 years of rifle and cartridge development, we have yet to surpass the .375's great versatility. The .405, in contrast, is not a heavy but it lacks the versatility of the .375. The .405 has a looping trajectory and doesn't have the reach of the .375. The .405 is strictly a close-range proposition. The .405 doesn't have the penetration that the .375 has, so it is not suitable for use against very heavy and thick-skinned animals. So it lacks reach and isn't suitable for heavy game? What else is left in Africa? The cats?

The ballistics of the .405 are a 400-grain projectile of .411" diameter propelled at 1900 f/s. The sectional density is very good but the velocity is is less than that of classic African cartridges like the .404 Jeffery, .425 Westley Richards, and .416 Rigby. Now, I am far from being a velocity freak. But I believe there is a considerable difference in killing power between a projectile that hits at 1900 f/s and a projectile that hits at 2300 f/s. Those 400 f/s are critical. That 400 f/s difference is the difference between the .30-30 and the .30-06. It is also the same difference between the .458 Win Mag and the .458 Lott/.450 Ackley/.460 G&A/.450 Rigby, etc. In both of these cases, the projectiles going only 400 f/s faster have considerably more killing power than their slower siblings. In contrast, rounds that travel yet another 400 f/s faster like the .300 Win Mag and the .460 Weatherby are not demonstrably better killers. So the velocity gap between 1900 f/s and 2400 f/s appears be critical, whereas the velocity gap between 2400 f/s and 2800 f/s appears to be superfluous.

If we take the .35 Whelen as an example, it follows the classic formula. The .35 Whelen is a 250-grain projectile of .358" diameter propelled at, you guessed it, 2400 f/s. The Whelen's fat and stubby projectile lacks the very high sectional density of the 6.5mm/160, 7mm/173, .308/220, .338/250, .375/300, .416/400, .458/480, etc. so it is not suitable for pentrating elephant skulls and such, but it is undeniably very effective on plains game. But what if that same projectile were propelled at 1900 f/s like the .458 and .405? Would it be effective? I don't think so. The .358 Winchester, for example, it not even considered a medium and generally considered to possess less killing power than the .30-06.

If you look at all of the classic killers, the rounds that have proven themselves over several generations, whether light, medium, or heavy, they propel a bullet of very high sectional density at about 2400 f/s. The 6.5 Mannlicher with 160-grain bullets does this, as does the .275 Rigby. This is why Karamojo Bell was able to use the 6.5 and .275 on game such as elephants. Same for the .30-06/220 on buff, lion, and elephant as well as lighter plains game. The .416 Rigby and .450 Rigby follow this formula exactly. Only the .375 is slightly faster than 2400 f/s and that extra velocity is more for trajectory than it is for killing power.

In downgrading the velocity from 2400 f/s to 1900 f/s, much is lost. The .405 is a fine medium for close-range work, but primarily because it fires such a large bullet. But the .405 really isn't suited for African game. It lacks the power for heavy game like elephant, hippo, and buffalo, and yet it lacks the trajectory for things like plains game. This is strike two.

Add to this the fact that the .405 is chambered in a lever action. There is nothing wrong with lever actions, but they are far from "African" in any sense of the term. To me, when I think of Africa, I think of doubles and bolts. Not lever actions, or, God forbid, pumps. Other than Charles Cottar, I cannot think of a single professional hunter, past or present, who used or uses a lever action. And this goes for his light, medium, and heavy rifles. The .405 is a lever-action cartridge. Strike three.

The .405 wasn't propelled by cordite. Almost all of the classic African cartridges were propelled by cordite. Certain exceptions exist like the .500 Jeffery (which was merely a renamed .500 Schuler and adopted by Jeffery as its own) and the .275 Rigby (which is merely the 7x57 Mauser that Rigby's renamed and called its own). Both the .500 Jeffery and .275 Rigby are German in origin and I believe both used nitrcellulose propellants. Karamojo Bell used DWM 173-grain steel jacketed solid ammunition in his .275, and I believe this load was propelled by nitrocellulose propellant as well. But the vast majority of classic African rounds were propelled by cordite. This includes all of the Nitro Express rounds, the .416 Rigby, .404 Jeffery, .303 British, .425 Westley Richards, .505 Gibbs, .375 Holland & Holland, and so on. When I thnk of "classic African" ammunition, Kynoch immediately comes to mind, and Kynoch ammunition was loaded with cordite. The .405 wasn't propelled by cordite. Strike four.

I realize it sounds as if I'm trashing the .405, but I'm not. It's a great cartridge and a truly classic one as well. I wouldn't mind at all owning a 1895 chambered in .405 and I'm sure it's deadly. I doubt a shot animal would and turn say, "hey, that's not a true African cartridge you just shot me with". We're basically arguing pedigree and aesthetics here. But, despite the fact the .405 is a classic cartridge and an effective one, and despite the fact that Theodore Roosevelt and Calvin Cottar used it in Africa and had great fondness for it, it's just not a classic African cartridge.
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