Expedition Exchange Bulletin Boards  

Go Back   Expedition Exchange Bulletin Boards > General
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #26  
Old March 10th, 2005, 09:14 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,147
Eric, if you want some biggie stickers, just let me know.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old March 10th, 2005, 10:18 AM
Eric Siepmann
 
Posts: n/a
Will do. Planning on MAR and maybe the National ralley. Also got Tellico in the works.

EwS
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old March 10th, 2005, 10:35 AM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
I worked retail once -- a long time ago in a golf equipment chain. Out of every ten customers that walked in, probably eight just wanted to touch, manipulate, and misplace everything in the joint. It sucked. And they all want you to explain the engineering of the clubs to them, when both of you know that in a million years they aren't buying anything. We used to have regulars that would come in and buy nothing twice a week.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old March 10th, 2005, 11:12 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,147
Aaaah, golf pro shops. That was the life. Back in high school, I was a range boy at Rio Hondo golf course in Downey and occasionally had to man the shop. All sorts of weird people came into the shop.

I'm sure you've seen the sucka who opens up a box of balls and begins to bounce them off the ground just to see how high they'll bounce. In his mind, the higher the ball bounced off the ground the better it would perform. This sucka invariably wanted Top Flite or Pinnacles. Of course he would want Top Flite XL instead of the regular Top Flite, just for the XtraLong distance or something. Guys like this sucka were so stupid they couldn't grasp the concept that golf is 75% or more short game and that these rock-hard balls just ruined their scores.

If he asked me what I played, I would tell him that I played Titleist balata. There was no Pro V1 or modern ball back then; it was just DT or balata. So I played balata. The guy's eyes would bulge and whiten when he saw the price of Titleist balls. They cost more for a dozen than an 18-pack of Top Flites cost. And of course he wouldn't buy the Top Flites anyway. He would just go to the used ball bin at Roger Dunn's, the same bin that held the balls recovered from lakes and were sitting in water for Lord knows how long. He would also think I was an idiot for playing 90 compression instead of 100. Just like all idiots, he was of the "more is better" school of "thought".
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old March 10th, 2005, 11:13 AM
kevb kevb is offline
Kevin Barrett
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Scotland
Posts: 45
shit, i've used most of those phrases at one time or another, thought I was being smart.

Still I should get a good price for those stickers on ebay.

Just putting a big order together for the new 90 John.........
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old March 10th, 2005, 11:33 AM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
lol. I've seen people picking through ball bins and bouncing them. That's so stupid.

Golf merchandise lends itself to tire kickers. Especially if you have a net they can hit into. I used to hate that net so bad...
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old March 10th, 2005, 11:46 AM
ronward ronward is offline
KI4WWU
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Columbus, GA
Posts: 738
100% correct about the Golf Shop cheap bastards. It's because so many people like to think they are good enough golfers or that somehow by associating themselves with a really good golf product somehow they are wealthy or successful or so good they could turn pro.

Just look in the gallery at any major PGA event and you'll see 100's of these dicks. Every one of them has just enough cash to score a one-day Sunday pass and about 6 Heinekens, then it's back to the battery plant or the car lot or whatever.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old March 10th, 2005, 11:52 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,147
Matt, has this ever happened to you?:

You're at the driving range and hitting your driver. You're pounding the drives. The kind of drives where your ball launches and whooshes through the air like a bullet, and instead of apexing it seemingly keeps rising and rising and then it rises yet again before it peaks and comes to the ground. You're swinging so well you're posing while the ball is in flight. You have just that right amount of draw on it too, and when it lands the ball rolls like crazy until it's almost out of sight. Every time you hit the ball, the sound echoes through the driving range. Whack! Whack! Whack! Soon, there's a little crowd behind you watching you hit. The more people watching you, the better you hit. You launch big drive after big drive.

You finish off the bucket and begin to put away your driver. Some sucka walks up to you and asks, "Hey, what kind of driver is that?"

LOL.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old March 10th, 2005, 12:25 PM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
yeah, that happens. Usually it's the same guys who have a bag full of knock off irons with (unknowingly) different lie angles and swingweights for each club, but with graphite shafts.

Funny though, if you start to turn it the other way and get a good power fade working, those hacks won't look at you. "Yeah, he hits it far, be he slices." Cracks me up. Tell that Fred Couples or Jack Nicklaus, who have only made about a billion dollars working it left to right.

I was at the range once minding my own beeswax when I started to hear this horrible racket from the other end of the range. I mean it was loud. So loud that it was really distracting, so I went to see what the hell was going on down there. Some gullible 20 handicapper was hitting (edit: trying to hit) his brand spanking new driver, which apparently was engineered to make the most horrible, hollow sounding noise I've ever heard a golf club make: it sounded like woman's softball bat hitting some big ass ball bearings. And resonating for a few seconds afterward. It was so loud. And this chump thought he was getting extra distance because of the din he was creating -- he was smiling from ear to ear. The thing had some cheesy Big Bertha rip off name, like "large marge" or something.

There sure are a lot of idiots out there...
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old March 10th, 2005, 12:34 PM
hochung hochung is offline
Ho Chung
W6HC
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Rancho Palos Verdes, CA
Posts: 2,006
i bet the turkey had super stiff shafts. LOL cuz he has a swing speed of 200 mph.
____________________
Ho Chung

Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old March 10th, 2005, 12:49 PM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
It was probably like 40 mph before the large marge then 200 after he bought his "game improvement club."
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old March 10th, 2005, 01:30 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,147
Oh yeah, there are definitely parallels between the golfing and offroading worlds.

The "more is better" mentality definitely exists in both worlds. Just as some offroaders want the biggest possible tire, some golfers want the biggest possible driver head. If anything can be quantified, they want more of it. Whether it's cubic displacement of the driver head, stiffness of the shaft, shaft length, ball compression, the number of dimples on a ball, RTI, lift, tire diameter, approach angle, departure angle, gear reduction, etc., it matters not. More is better.

The "just as good" mentality also exists in both worlds. The Cougar line of golf clubs is sort of like the Voyager roof rack, and a buyer who buys one will likely buy the other. What's funny about Cougar clubs is that they started off as a knock-off of Lynx clubs. I can understand why Voyager would want to copycat Highlander racks, but who in his right mind would want to copycat Lynx clubs? The fake Big Bertha clubs at least make some sense but the names are hilarious, like "Large Marge" and "Big Brother" and so on.

The "let's get drunk" mentality also exists in golf and offroading. There are untold thousands of golfers who must drink beer while they're golfing. As if their games weren't bad enough, they must down a few beers and sit in the hot sun like some wino to make their games even worse. Perhaps it's to ease the pain of being a hack. Perhaps it's to feign indifference to their lousy scores. Perhaps it's just because they're losers and can't have a good time without getting drunk. Who knows.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old March 10th, 2005, 01:48 PM
traveltoad traveltoad is offline
Aaron Shrier
KI6BCA
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: San Fernando Valley
Posts: 2,628
Maybe they drink to make driving the golf carts more fun!
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old March 10th, 2005, 02:11 PM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
You're 100 percent correct -- if it can be quantified, people are going to want the biggest one. The guys I play with are good golfers, and even some of those guys buy new drivers every year as the heads get bigger. Some of them look like soup ladles.

Like all these jokers running around with 44s on their 2WD Chevys.

That's hysterical about the cougars. Fred Couples is the only man on the planet who could hit Lynx clubs worth a shit, though he probably could have used a coke bottle on the end of a stick. So who came up with the big idea to imitate Lynx crap? Too funny. It's like a knockoff Saturn or something.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old March 10th, 2005, 02:24 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,147
Man, don't even get me started on the golf cart thing. I have never understood why a player in good health would prefer to ride than walk. I'm always a little sad too when I see a father taking out his child to learn to play golf and the kid is riding in a cart. What a pity. He will never learn the joys of walking the course. It's great that the father is sharing the joys of golf with his child, but at least have the kid walk the course.

Fred Couples is a bit of an enigma to me. I could never understand Fred Couples' endorsements. Perhaps he had a weird agent or something, but poor Fred always ended up endorsing shitty stuff like Lynx and Cadillac. Kinda goes with his unshaven face though.

I have always liked guys who endorsed the nice stuff. For a time, Phil Mickelson was all styled out with his Hugo Boss clothing, Rolex watches, Titleist clubs and balls, Mercedes-Benz automobiles and so on. Now he's Mr. Ford and Callaway.

For a while Justin Leonard was stylin as well. He was sporting the Polo Ralph Lauren clothing, Titleist balls, wedges, driver, spoon, gloves, Scotty Cameron putters (and he had that bitchin Coronado with the oilcan finish and the Anser neck), Hogan Apex blades, etc. Leonard's clubs were super sweet. Then he started hacking and I guess he lost all of his high-dollar deals.
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old March 10th, 2005, 03:05 PM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
And Justin needs to get hats that fit properly. For some reason, his Hogan hats always looked ridiculous on him -- like they should have a propeller on the top.

As much of a goon as he is, Davis Love probably has my favorite sponsors. Polo, Titleist/Cameron, and Foot Joy. I like the classic stuff. Nowadays all these young turks think it's cool to have tight ass pink hip huggers with like a huge white belt and a shirt sleeved way too short. I must be getting old...

Mickelson needs to stop wearing those mock-collar shirts that accentuate his man boobs. As soon as he switched to Callaway, I started rooting against him, though I heard he made them design a forged iron specifically for him -- no way they were going to get him to play that investment cast crap that they sling.

More and more high end golf courses are frowning upon walking, which sucks. They don't like the fact that they can't hit you up for a cart fee.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old March 10th, 2005, 03:12 PM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
oh yeah, here's a prediction: Justin is going to win at Augusta this year. He's got a win under his belt already and seems to be in good form.

I've got a feeling it's either him or Jose Maria Olazabul, a two time champion at Augusta. Maybe if he stopped playing that Macgregor crap he could put his drives in the fairway and win some more.

I love Jose's short game. For some reason, spanish golfers have a flair that's fun to watch.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old March 10th, 2005, 03:53 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,147
Some of these modern courses are ridiculous. They're basically made so that no sane person would ever walk them. Some of the tees are elevated hundreds of feet, and the walk from one green to the next tee is in the hundreds of yards. Totally ridiculous.

Pete Dye just loves to pull this stuff. There are a few Pete Dye courses in Palm Springs, and with the intense heat there there is no way the courses could ever be walked. To add insult to injury, Dye's courses are all but impossible. PGA West is a good example. Whoever heard of a par 3 with an island green, and the green is 200 yards away? That's ridiculous. I think it's the 17th at PGA West. When I played there, there was a severe head-wind and I kept hooking my shots into the water because I had to hit my spoon to reach the green. Another shot landed on the green but the green was so rock hard from the desert sun and winds that the ball bounced off the green and rolled into the water. I think I lost four or five balls on that hole alone and everyone in my group lost at least three balls. There wasn't even a drop area and we had to re-hit from the tee. I appreciate a challenge but that's ridiculous. And this was when I was playing a lot. I was a three-handicapper back then. I can't imagine what the average 20-30 handicapper went through on that hole.

Dye designed another course near the shop here called Ocean Trails. It's in beautiful Palos Verdes and it's famous for every hole having an ocean view. But this sucka couldn't leave it at that and had to put water on this course! Imagine an oceanside golf course with lakes! How ridiculous is that? I swear, Pete Dye would plant trees at St. Andrews if he had it his way. Throw in a couple lakes too while he's at it.

It would be sweet if Leonard won at Augusta this year. Maybe he would go back to his Uptown endorsements then.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old March 10th, 2005, 06:15 PM
ronward ronward is offline
KI4WWU
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Columbus, GA
Posts: 738
DLIII is a great guy. Not the most athletic looking or acting, but he can hit the ball. A finese player for the ages. I've always found the super huge Ralph Lauren Polo logo on his shirts to just look funny in person. They are like 2" tall or something so the camera can pick it up easily.

Go into the pro shop at Ocean Forest or The Lodge at Sea Island and they have racks and racks of the super extra large logo Polo shirts at $90-$125 each.... I once saw a guy buying a Titleist tour bag with nice leather trim and black watch plaid inserts with "Titleist" and "D. Love III" in gold leaf on the side. He walked out of the old Sea Island Golf Club pro shop, ripped off the tags and put his clubs in it on the curb, then hauled it over to the caddy stand like he'd just wheeled in from Carmel or something.

One more thing, don't most courses now prefer cart usage over walking to speed up the play? The ultra courses like at Sea Island and Augusta, and many more in California and elsewhere, still offer caddy service I believe.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old March 11th, 2005, 10:11 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,147
I really like DL3. He has a very sweet swing and he endorses cool stuff. I'm sure Love gets offers from Nike to use Nike balls and such, but he sticks with the nice stuff. DL3 also uses sweet clubs. He used to play Mizuno MP-29 irons a while back. After he started playing for Titleist, he played all sorts of different custom ground Titleist blades. And DL3 also endorses cool stuff like FootJoy shoes, Titleist gloves and clubs, Titleist balls ("from the very beginning"), Polo Golf clothing, etc.

DL3's only "off" I think was the True Temper Sensicore shaft. I demo'd some Sensicores once and I didn't like it at all. It was a hacker shaft. Why would anybody like less feedback from his clubs? Sure, if you're shanking and skulling every other shot it would help. But if you're a decent player, the Sensicore just makes you worse. It's sort of like playing cavity-back irons. You hit them well for a week or two but then you get lazy from the lack of harshness on mishits and soon you can't score at all with them. There was a rumor that Love used the Sensicore only in his 1 iron, if only so that he could truthfully say that he used the Sensicore shaft. I have no idea if this is correct.

I have always cracked up at staff bags. I can see why the pros use them, as they must carry rain suits, umbrella, spare shoes and socks, tools like spike wrenches, towels, dozens of balls, a Ziploc bag full of gloves, etc. It's against the Rules of Golf to share any equipment at all, and so the caddy has to be absolutely sure that his player will have everything he might possibly need with him. I don't know what one of these loaded staff bags weighs, but it must be a lot.

But for the average player to use a staff bag is ridiculous. Whenever I see a player with a staff bag, it's almost always some hacker. He rides in a cart. His clubs are hacker clubs. He usually has like 20 clubs in his bag, and his 21st club is one of those telescoping poles with the cup at the end for fishing balls out of the lake or giving him the reach necessary to fish out balls under poison oak. To these guys finding someone else's Top Flite on the course is an occasion of joy. But I'm sure these guys crack up at me and my PING Hoofer. To my way of looking at things, the only cool non-pro staff bag was the bag Rodney Dangerfield had in Caddyshack. That was sweet.

One of my friends from my old firm received a set of clubs from his mother upon graduating from law school. Neither he nor his mother played golf. But his mother wanted the very best for her son. She went to some hack golf shop and said she wanted the top of the line. The sucka at the shop sold her a full-on set of King Cobra hacker clubs and a black leatherette King Cobra staff bag with my friend's name boldly embroidered on the bag. When I saw that hunk of shit I couldn't even hold it in. I started rolling. Poor Scott. He can't even dump the set because it was a gift from his mother.

On the cart thing, I tend to agree more with Matt's theory that the courses prefer carts because they can charge more. I can see how carts could speed up play on Uptown courses that are not heavily played, as the carts would enable the players to reach their balls that much faster. But fast play really isn't an issue on these courses at all. On public courses where I play, it's no problem at all to keep up with the group ahead, even if that group is carting and we're walking.

I still believe that the cart thing is bad for golf. The carts tear up the course whenever conditions are wet and I think they're a little cheesy. Carts are fine with older people, handicapped people, or people in poor health. After all, one of the great joys of golf is that it is a game for a lifetime. You can play until you die. My father is old enough that he can't carry 14 clubs around, but he still walks and uses a pull cart. I think this is the way to approach the age problem. But for young children to be carting around is a little sad. These kids will never learn the joys of walking the course. If they play in Junior Golf, they will hack because they now have to carry. They'll be more tired than usual and their rhythm will be off. All Junior Golf, high school golf, and college golf tournaments require the players to walk and carry their own bags. If the courses want to make more money, there is nothing wrong with that. But I think they should just raise the green fees and be done with it.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old March 11th, 2005, 11:26 AM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
I remember taking apart a sensicore shaft -- the "sensicore" is a tiny straw with a cheap foam spiral around it. Total bullshit. I've never noticed any dampening effect from them, and I see no reason to spend the extra money on something like that. I agree with you -- feedback is a good thing. If I hit it poorly, even just a little bit, I want to feel it.

I do think, though, that a little bit of cavity back is good thing sometimes. If I didn't gamble so much on the golf course, I'd play Titleist forged 680's. To me, that is the most elegant iron out there, and when you hit those things the right way, you realize why you play the game. It's so pure. But if you hit them off the toe just a little, you're going to be ten yards short in the bunker, hopefully not buried in the lip. I can't afford that, because like it or not, I hit it a little off the toe or heel sometimes. Stuff like that can be very expensive in the game I play in.

I hate Pete Dye designs. How many times can we see a pot bunker? Good golf courses, to me, are hard without being "trick." I wouldn't go so far as to call most of his designs trick, but they are close to it. I don't need 200 yard forced carries on par 3s; just give me a pretty course that looks like it fits in the natural landscape around it with true, fast greens and I'll be happy. Links or tree lined. Country Club or resort. I don't care, just don't make it goofy golf.

I used to be a big DLIII fan, and I still root for him every now and again. One of his touring pro friends (I want to say it was Payne Stewart, but I'm not sure) was giving an interview once and he called Davis "slick." The interviewer asked him why that was Davis' nickname, and the player replied something along the lines of, "because he is the exact opposite of slick. He's gullible and naive, and we rib him about it all the time." So then I started seeing Davis as one of these boring, personality lacking, southern blue blood guys who have no real style or taste of his own. I dunno, it's hard to explain. The thing is, as much his personality puts me off, his game draws me in. I root for him, but he's not one of my favorites anymore.

I would love to see the data on whether or not riding in a cart is faster than walking. It should be, in theory, but I don't find that it's the case. Usually, the two guys in the cart sit there and wait for each other to hit before approaching their own ball, not to mention all the breeze shooting and cell phone chatter you normally see from cart riders. When two guys are walking, they each walk to their own ball and start sizing things up, and usually, by the time one hits, the other is done with his preshot stuff and is ready to hit right away. Ultimately, pace of play is determined by how many strokes it takes you to get the ball in the hole, I guess. Walking is definitely more enjoyable.

I get a kick out of young guys with staff bags, especially with their name on them. You have to have an inflated ego to try to pull that off. When I went to the pro tournament in New Orleans last year, I was surprised at the number of pros who use carry bags like the hoofer. I liked seeing that. I don't know if they were taking it easy on their caddy or if they just realized that they didn't need 400 cubic feet of storage in their golf bag, but I saw a few of them.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old March 11th, 2005, 11:56 AM
hochung hochung is offline
Ho Chung
W6HC
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Rancho Palos Verdes, CA
Posts: 2,006
you guys are getting me pumped up... i'll get my golf clubs and at least dust them off.

i hope my pimp graphite shaft isn't expired. LOL
____________________
Ho Chung

Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old March 11th, 2005, 12:00 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,147
For cavity-back irons, I have never figured out why hybrid designs never caught on. By "hybrid", I mean cavity long irons and blade short irons. Wilson once offered a hybrid set but it was a hacker hybrid set. It was cast from rock-hard stainless steel with square grooves and the heads were huge, even in the short irons.

Even the worst hackers can hit blade short irons with a reasonable amount of consistency. When I see these PING and Big Bertha short iron designs with their offset hosels and giant heads, I wonder what the designers were thinking. Probably three-fourths of golf is short game shots. This is where golf is played and this is the range within which scores are made or lost. To try to score with those giant heads so difficult. I wonder why this is not better understood.

Imagine a set of irons with MP-32 long irons:



And MP-33 short irons:



The MP32's would be slightly more forgiving on the hard-to-hit long irons but they would still be very playable clubs, not frying pans attached to a shaft. Let's say 1-6 would be MP32's. Then, the 7-10 would be MP33's. These blades are still easy to shit because of their loft and short lengths, and they are very playable clubs. The player can hit the ball or high at will with them. The 8, 9, and 10 are very small-headed and very usable around the green and in the tall grass. I'm sure the designers could blend the head shapes and sizes of these two designs so that the cavity-to-blade transition was smooth along the range of irons.

Unlike the hacker clubs that are cast from rock-hard stainless steel, these irons would be forged from very soft metal and provide a very good feel at impact. They would also get that bitchin patina with dents as they clang around in the bag. And, being chromed, the sweet spot on each club would slowly wear away and leave that bare metal on the sweet spot that is the mark of a solid player. Stainless or BeCu clubs do not and cannot get any of these nice touches.

I still prefer blades for everything but I could very happy with such a set.

Quote:
Originally Posted by matttaylor
just give me a pretty course that looks like it fits in the natural landscape around it with true, fast greens and I'll be happy. Links or tree lined. Country Club or resort. I don't care, just don't make it goofy golf."

Boy, did you hit the nail on the head. I think Pete Dye's biggest weakness as a designer is that he is utterly incapable of fitting his design to the surroundings. The lakes on an oceanside golf course is a good example. How many lakes are there near the beaches? Unreal. Dye is also Mr. Railroad Ties. He loves those things. His island greens are surrounded by railroad ties. How many railroad ties exist in nature? Dye's courses look so artificial.

I also like seeing carry bags at pro tournaments. It's pretty cool.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old March 11th, 2005, 12:55 PM
matttaylor matttaylor is offline
Matt Taylor
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 370
Nothing wrong with graphite shafts, Ho. They just don't function well in irons because their frequencies are hard to match from shaft to shaft, especially since iron shafts are different lenghts. So when you put graphite shafts in an iron set, there is no consistency in feel from club to club because they flex at different rates than each other. That's why it's rare to see a pro playing with graphite shafts in his irons, and even if you do, his equipment rep probably went through rigorous testing to match the frequencies in the shafts, which Joe Consumer ain't gonna get.

I have Aldila 65's in my driver and fairway woods, it's a pretty good graphite shaft.

Hogan and Macgregor both have hybrid sets that I looked at before I bought my latest Pings, but for some reason I couldn't pull the trigger on them. I never really considered the Macgregors, but the Hogans were pretty good except that the long irons were huge. They had big, thick toplines that I didn't want to look at from address.

The Pings I play now, John, are a very compact head with minimal offset, which I like. And they are heavy like a forged club. I sacrifice some of what I like in a club for the forgiveness, I guess because I currently prefer winning my bets over playing my dream irons. Alright, so I'm a bit of sellout...

Not on my wedges, though. Cleveland 588's in 52, 56, and 60 degrees of loft. The 56 has a rusty spot the size of a quater on the face, a little closer to the heel than the toe. It's my favorite club.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old March 11th, 2005, 01:42 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,147
What?!?!?!? You play Cleveland wedges but don't play RTG's? Pah!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Interesting Flash Photography Related Site IanKreidich General 6 July 10th, 2008 05:18 AM
Thank you Expedition Exchange thallca General 7 June 3rd, 2007 10:39 AM
Interesting New Website johnlee General 14 August 27th, 2004 09:35 PM
More OMEGA Porn - A Revival Of The Moon Watch In Space Use johnlee General 13 January 29th, 2004 08:02 PM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:15 AM.




Copyright 2001-2012 Expedition Exchange Incorporated. All rights reserved.
Powered by vBulletin Version 3.5.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.