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  #326  
Old July 16th, 2008, 10:56 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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  #327  
Old July 16th, 2008, 07:04 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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So my brother pulls up to the shop this afternoon and he's got this long thing inside a white towel:


This is my brother's Bushmaster AR. I love this thing. I think it's my favorite AR. I hadn't seen it in years.

Optical sight is the Trijicon ACOG Reflex:


Here's what the Reflex looks like when aimed at something:


The Reflex is similar to red dot sight, but there are no batteries. During the day, the orange dot reticle is powered by fiber optics (light enters into the unit through the transparent front of the unit). At night, the orange reticle is powered by tritium. I was surprised that my brother's tritium is still pretty good. This weapon is fairly old. Trijicon offers new tritium elements for the Reflex.

You can see that the reticle is not perfectly centered in the Reflex's viewing window. This does not matter, and the bullet will still land wherever the orange dot is. If you look through the center of the window, the reticle will be centered. But if you look from an angle, the reticle will move on the window to intersect your view of the target. The Reflex is a parallax-free design. I'm sure there's some small amount of parallax error in there, but not enough to be significant for a weapon of this type.

The orange dot is fairly large. I forgot how many minutes this dot subtends, but it's fairly big. On bullseye targets at 100 yards, the orange dot is very big against the bullseye. Again, for a weapon of this type, that doesn't matter. I actually want the reticle to be nice and big.

My brother's Reflex is mounted very low:


I think the axis of the viewing window is lower than the sight line of the AR's standard metallic sights. The Reflex comes with an adapter plate for mounting onto flat-top ARs, but we removed the mounting adapter all together and mounted the Reflex directly onto the AR's receiver to get the sight as low as possible.

There's no front sight on my brother's AR:


We ordered this AR from Bushmaster without the front sight. When I was building this carbine for my brother, we explored the idea of pop-up reserve iron sights, but decided not to put them on and just go with the Reflex to prevent the weapon from getting too busy.

You can tell by the vertical grooves on the back that this is an M16A2 pistol grip:


And yet there's no finger swell:


I ground off the finger swell and sanded the frontstrap smooth. I hate the A2's finger swell. I like to hold the AR with my firing hand as high as possible on the pistol grip, and the finger swell meets my hand at the middle of my middle finger. That finger swell is way too low. So I ground it off on my brother's AR.

Many others who dislike the finger swell opt for the M16A1 grip, but I like the vertical grooves and slightly larger size of the M16A2 grip so I prefer to fit the A2 grip and grind down the finger swell.

Selector is the standard AR selector:


There's still that gap between the trigger guard and the pistol grip. The mill-finished aluminum receiver is very sharp in this area. Many users insert a foam earplug to prevent abrasion to the firing hand's middle finger. Others fit aftermarket grips that fill in this empty portion. Still others fit aftermarket trigger guards that fill the void. I'm not sure which solution I like the best. I'll have to keep on the lookout for a nice solution and get it for my brother.

Flash suppressor is the standard M16A2 flash suppressor:


Again, nothing fancy here. Just an A2 flash suppressor. No Vortex suppressor or crenelated opening with razor-sharp teeth on the front.

My brother's Bushmaster is the double-pushpin type:


These lowers are common now, but when my brother got his Bushmaster long ago these double-pin lowers were hot stuff. Many ARs at the time had the threaded front "pin".

No HK416 gas system:


Just the standard direct-impingement. I still submit that the weakness in the AR system is the magazine and not the gas system. I don't see anything wrong with the gas system in fact. I think it works perfectly well and doesn't require re-design the way many claim.

My favorite AR magazine is the 20-shot magazine:


This thing is just barely bigger than a pack of cigarettes. But instead of 20 Class A Cigarettes, you get 20 Class A Death Rays.

This particular magazine is a Colt's:


If I recall, my brother's stash consists of Colt's 20-rounders and Bushmaster 30-rounders. I can't remember for sure.

I prefer the 20-shot mags, but I also like the 30-shot mags because I can get a better grip on the longer 30-shot mags. I like to use the so-called beer can grip on the magazine to insert it into the magazine well and then tug on it to test it. It's hard to get a beer can grip on the 20-shot magazine because of its short length. But there's no doubt that the 20-shot magazines make for a slimmer and trimmer weapon overall.

My brother's AR is fitted with a Giles Tactical Sling:


There are many good slings out there, but my favorite AR sling is probably the Giles.

This AR is a rocket. Functionally, it blows away my HK43. The telescoping buttstock offers a pretty decent rotational adjustment range, and we set up this stock to have a small amount of cast-off for the toe. It fits the right-hander perfectly. And the Reflex is at such a nice height. With the finger swell removed, the shooter can his firing hand nice and high on the weapon.

And the weapon overall is just so clean. There's no bullshit on it. No spare batteries in the buttstock. No spare bolt head or spare rounds in the pistol grip. No tape switches for flashlights or lasers.

I think the only two things I would change are:

(1) Fill in the void behind the trigger guard to remove those sharp edges from touching the middle finger; and

(2) Trigger job. The trigger action on this particular AR isn't horrible, but it would be nice to have a crisp trigger action on this weapon. Most people go for the multiple flashlights and Picatinny rails on their ARs and yet their guns have terrible trigger actions. I think a good trigger is the most important part of a good gun.

With those two mods, it would be "perfect". Sure, I could go crazy and fit a four-position telescoping buttstock for use with body armor or a hydraulic buffer or ambidextrous selector or whatever. These things aren't terrible. But I like my battle carbines as simple as possible. Everything you need and nothing you don't.

Damn, I feel a little AR envy.
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  #328  
Old July 16th, 2008, 11:35 PM
greghirst greghirst is offline
Greg Hirst
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I remember B&B Westminster and Hollywood stores.

I still kick myself for all the sweet guns I handled and passed up. I recall several HK91's I almost bought but figured I could "always buy one later."

When I worked in Newport Beach for several years ('89-93) I used to stop by the Westminster store and then Fowler's Stockade and then Fowler's Gun Room during my drive back to Riverside.
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  #329  
Old July 16th, 2008, 11:56 PM
greghirst greghirst is offline
Greg Hirst
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
Jack, here's one that is similar to your gulf war pic:


The caption is obviously incorrect.

I don't think G.I. Joe there has any clue what he found.

Yes, the Stg44 or Stg45 certainly wasn't standard issue to the Volksturm.

There were a few crappy quality weapons designed primarily for the Volksturm including a copy of the cheap British Sten. It was called the MP 3008 and had a bottom-feed magazine rather than side.

However, the weapon they are probably referring to is the Volkssturmgewehr 1-5 or Gustloff. It fired the 7.92x33 and used the Stg44 30 round magazine. I'm surprised John hasn't mentioned it (that I recall) as it used a similiar gas-delayed blowback to the HK P7.

Hey, wiki even lists it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkssturmgewehr_1-5

Last edited by greghirst : July 17th, 2008 at 12:51 AM.
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  #330  
Old July 17th, 2008, 08:44 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Greg, are you on drugs?

G.I. Joe isn't holding a StG44 or StG45(M). He's holding a MKb42(W):


And do you know how many times I've mentioned the VG1-5? Every time I talk about the P7's method of operation, I mention the VG1-5. It's one of the cool things about the P7.
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  #331  
Old July 17th, 2008, 09:16 AM
greghirst greghirst is offline
Greg Hirst
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I wish I was.

No, I did not recognize it. It looked like a Stg45 to me (still rare as hell). But now that you point it out(and a closer look), it is the MKb42(W).

I guess the fact that it says the pic is at the Walther plant in mid-1945 should have been a giveaway.

And no, I don't recall your mention of the VG 1-5 but I'm sure you have. Unfortunately, I just don't read everything posted.
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  #332  
Old July 17th, 2008, 09:32 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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I'm still bummed B&B shut down. When my brother and I were younger, we would hit South Coast Plaza on the weekends and stop off at the Westminster B&B on the way home. During law school, I would often go shooting at Angeles on Fridays and stop off at the North Hollywood B&B on my way home.

I'm going to miss the B&B logo as well:


What says gun love more than a pair of bumble bees toting G3s? That B&B logo still cracks me up. It's as sweet as the Carmelita Chorizo pig holding a baseball bat.
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  #333  
Old July 17th, 2008, 09:38 AM
greghirst greghirst is offline
Greg Hirst
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What was the reason they shut down? They always seemed pretty busy selling when I visited.

I'm sure you knew ARM USA moved to Lake Havasu, AZ.
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  #334  
Old July 17th, 2008, 09:44 AM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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I'm not sure why B&B shut down. I don't know if it was for lack of business or if the owner did something illegal and lost his FFL.

I didn't know ARM USA moved to AZ. That sucks. A few years from now, I'll probably be kicking myself for not buying an Arctic Warfare.
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  #335  
Old July 17th, 2008, 02:45 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Peep this action:

http://www.robertrtg.com/g3magazines.html

Brand new G3 aluminum mags for $8 each, or 10 for $70.

10 used mags for $19.

This is cheaper than AK mags. I can't believe how cheap these thngs are. Should I go out to dinner tonight or get 100 G3 magazines?

I'm pissed.
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  #336  
Old July 17th, 2008, 04:16 PM
Nadir_E
 
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Annoying as hell....

I liked the aluminum mag's for my old HK91, too, John - just something about 'em (in addition to being somewhat lighter).

Didn't know you were into the AI Arctic Warfare platform, John - what caliber were you considering when you looked at it?

-n
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  #337  
Old July 17th, 2008, 05:07 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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.308.

As far as I'm concerned, it's the only choice. I certainly wouldn't want an AW in .243 or .223. That would suck.

I don't like the AWM (Arctic Warfare Magnum) either. .300 Win Mag and .338 Lapua aren't loaded in the bazillions by dozens of different countries like .308.

Gotta be .308.
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  #338  
Old July 18th, 2008, 06:57 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Heckler & Koch's instructional video for the G36:






This video is pretty cool. It's not the Cold War era stuff, but the narrator's accent adds flavor.

I had thought the G36's magazine catch locked onto the side of the magazine. After seeing the instructional video, now I realize that the magazine catch locks against the rear face of the magazine and what looks like a lateral locking catch for the magazine is merely a double layer of polymer for the magazine well's locking pin.

One shortcoming in the G36's otherwise excellent human engineering is that the cocking handle must be hinged to the side and pulled backward to release the bolt carrier after reloading. While this is light years ahead of the actions required to reload a G3, bolt releases have been around for decades and the fact that the G36 lacks one is a glaring omission. Heckler & Koch rectified the G36's ergonomic shortcoming on the XM8 (which is basically a dressed up G36):


On the XM8, the bolt carrier may be released by depressing downward on the magazine catch or in the standard G36 manner. Note also the XM8's excellent human engineering for the magazine release. Users accustomed to the AK and G3 can use the paddle magazine release. Users accustomed to pistols like the P7M8, USP, and P2000 can release the magazine with their trigger finger. The lateral magazine release levers exist on both sides of the trigger guard and are therefore ambidextrous. I have seen pics of G36s retrofitted with the XM8's magazine release. I'm not sure if the XM8's bolt release may be fitted to the G36, but I'm guessing it can.

I really like how the G36 instructional video covers the G36's method of operation. Most manuals ignore this, and I think it's a mistake. The G36's method of operation is copied from the AR18 and is the same method of operation found on the HK416:

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  #339  
Old July 19th, 2008, 10:24 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Some HK love from www.mg-42.net.

P7M13 and early G3 with walnut furniture and Norwegian-pattern rear sight drum:


This is a pretty unique G3. The cocking handle is the all-steel type and the trigger guard is CETME, but the rear sight is the HK rear sight, albeit with a flared sight drum. The stocks are the older walnut type, but the magazine well features the new, triangular corrugations. It appears to be transitional model. It's very cool.

Rheinmetall steel and aluminum G3 magazines:


Rheinmetall G3 recoil buffer:


Rheinmetall is part of G3 history. When the German government negotiated with NWM for non-Spanish production rights to the CETME rifle, the German government assigned the production rights to both Rheinmetall and Heckler & Koch. Both firms produced the G3, but Rheinmetall later relinquished the G3 production rights to Heckler & Koch in exchange for Heckler & Koch's reciprocal relinquishment of production rights for the MG3. Basically, Rheinmetall ran with MG3 and Heckler & Koch ran with the G3. Heckler & Koch is basically the modern-day Mauserwerke, so it was only appropriate that the StG45(M)'s modern-day equivalent should come back to Heckler & Koch, in Oberndorf.

Hellenic Arms (Greek) G3 trigger housing:


Kongsberg (Norwegian) aluminum 20-shot G3 magazine:


FMP (Portuguese) aluminum 20-shot G3 magazine:


Carl Gustav (Swedish) steel 20-shot G3 magazine:


Enfield (British) G3 bolt head:


Norwegian MP5 rear sight configuration:


Rheinmetall-produced prototype G3 with HK53-style barrel:


This weapon is interesting. Note the CETME trigger guard and rear sight. The magazine well's reinforcing corrugation is also linear in pattern rather than the typical triangular pattern seen on G3s. The cocking handle is all steel and lacks the rubberized or polymer handles found on later models. This is Funky Old School. According to mg-42.net, there are only ten of these prototypes in existence, and the weapon was intended for use by tank crews.

What looks like a G3K:


This is the only slimline G3K forend I've seen. All of the other G3Ks I've seen had the G33 forend fitted. I'd love to get one of these forends for my HK43. I think it looks way cooler than the tropical forend I currently have or the typical G33 slimline forend, which looks like this:


That's the forend my HK43 came with. It's checkered along its entire surface. It's ribbed slightly but nothing like the sweet forend on that G3K. I never liked the looks of this forend, so my HK43 is currently fitted with the tropical forend like on this G33:


But I am seriously digging that prototype G3K's forend. The closest thing I've seen to that G3K's forend is the forend on this prototype G33K


I wonder if the forends on the prototype G3K and G33K are just modified G3 slimline forends. They sort of look like it. The G3K prototype has the blind ovals at the muzzle end and the G33K prototype has the blind ovals at the rear. It's possible the HK engineers just took standard G3 slimline forends and modified them to fit.

G33SG/1:


Just stunning. This is the 5.56 version of the G3SG/1 sniper rifle. I'd love to have one of these in my stash.

MP5-PDW:


This one is another stunner for me, at least from far away. It's close to perfect. I've always wanted a PDW, and this one is in my favorite configuration with the double magazine clamp, curved 30-shot MP5 magazines, SEF trigger pack, and Trijicon tritium front sight. It's so sweet. My only nits are the barrel is not threaded like the real PDW barrels, the buttstock looks like a Choate and not an HK, and I would prefer an HK rifle sight over the MP5 rear sight.

I don't like using the MP5 rear sight with the large aperture because I can see the opposite side of the sight drum at the bottom edge of the aperture. The view through the large aperture looks more oval than round. I much prefer to use an HK rifle sight with the 300-meter aperture drilled out to ghost-ring dimensions. The opposite side of the sight drum doesn't show through the large aperture because the HK rifle sight is notched at this location for the 100-meter setting. The sight picture is very clean through the rifle sight with large aperture. But overall that PDW is looking sweet.

Various HK pistols:


The pistol with the buttstock is VP70M. Clockwise from the VP70M is the HK4, P7K3, P7M13, P7M8, P7, USP, P9S, and Mk23. The USP and Mk23 fire from a locked breech and operate on the short-recoil principle. The others fire from an unlocked breech in various forms of blowback operation. The VP70M, HK4, and P7K3 are simple blowbacks. The P7s fire from gas-delayed blowback.

There's actually a lot of Wehrmacht love in those pistols. The VP70M might be the modern-day equivalent of the VG1-5. The HK4 is basically a modern version of the Mauser HSc. The P9S is basically a pistol version of the G3, both in construction and method of operation. And the P7 uses the VG1-5's method of operation.

Kongsberg AG3:


Note the angled sling snap on the rear of the slimline forend, double magazine clamp on the aluminum magazines, and the flared rear sight drum. This thing is beautiful. I think it looks way cooler than the Bundeswehr G3s.

Serrated bolt carrier for silent bolt closure:


To close the bolt "silently" on an AG3, ease the cocking handle forward and let it strip the topmost round from the magazine and go forward to chamber the round. G3s are push feeds rather than controlled feeds, so the extractor must snap over the case head for complete headspace. The serrated bolt carrier lets the user push the bolt carrier forward with his thumb with sufficient pressure that the extractor will deflect and snap over the chambered case head. This is far from "silent", but if you have ever heard a G3 chamber a round in the conventional manner, you will just how "silent" this procedure is compared to the conventional method of releasing the cocking handle and letting the bolt slam violently forward.

Cocking handle and receiver markings on the AG3:


The cocking handle is all steel and lacks the rubberized or polymer handles found on later HKs. The later HKs come with rubberized cocking handles like this:


You can see by the close-up of the receiver that the AG3 is simply parkerized and is not painted with semigloss black paint on top of the phosphating like later HK weapons.

The unique dust cover on the AG3:


This dust cover lets the soldier mount a bayonet onto the AG3 without first removing the dust cover. HK dust covers lack the hole and look like this:


On the left is the dust cover. The older, aluminum version is on the right. My HK91 came with a steel dust cover, as do the "current" models. My HK43 is old enough that it came with the older, aluminum dust cover.
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  #340  
Old July 19th, 2008, 10:45 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Norwegians using the AG3:


Swedes with the AK4:


British with the SA80:


I hate how we use the Springfield, Garand, or M14 for Uptown stuff. It sucks. We should use the current service weapon. If we're going to fake it, we might as well use swords.
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  #341  
Old July 19th, 2008, 11:13 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Two more from Wiki, too large to attach.

Norwegian palace guard:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...ce%2C_Oslo.jpg

Just awesome. Love the hat. Love the green hairbrushes on the shoulders. Love the white gloves. Love the leather mag pouches. And definitely love the rifle. Homeboy even has the four locking pins oriented in the correct direction (inserted from the port side for right-handers and from the starboard side for left-handers to prevent inadvertent loosening of the locking pins from pressing the weapon against the body).

Norwegian soldier on exercise:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...ldier_2007.jpg

It's remarkable how much "sharper" the G3 looks when it's not painted black. All of the stamping details look much crisper without the paint.

The rear sight is the Norwegian type with the flared sight drum, and he's selected the 200-meter aperture.

Note the blue bolt carrier. It looks to be some kind of blank or plastic training device. I'm not sure, but I'm guessing the latter because of the blue color. The bolt carrier is probably lighter in weight than the standard bolt carrier and the method of operation is probably converted to simple blowback for use with the plastic training ammunition.

His selector is set to safe and his trigger finger is straight and outside the trigger guard.

His HK sling is clipped to the forend in the proper manner. His rifle is not stabilized with the hands but the weight of the weapon is borne by the shoulder rather than the arms. You can see he wrapped the slider buckle in tape to reduce the clatter. And his locking pins are oriented correctly as well.

Basically, homebody's got it going on.
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  #342  
Old July 20th, 2008, 05:09 PM
Nadir_E
 
Posts: n/a
Old School - Portuguese soldiers in Mozambique back in the 60's. Lots of G3/CETME variants floating around that continent from back then to present day...

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  #343  
Old July 21st, 2008, 11:32 AM
Keith Armstrong Keith Armstrong is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
Peep this action:

http://www.robertrtg.com/g3magazines.html

Brand new G3 aluminum mags for $8 each, or 10 for $70.

.

I did get some of Robert's "like new" ally mags. A little judicious filing and they snap right into the Cetme

KAA
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  #344  
Old July 21st, 2008, 12:28 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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Wait. Time out.

You have a CETME?

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  #345  
Old July 21st, 2008, 01:11 PM
Keith Armstrong Keith Armstrong is offline
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Mea Culpa Drill Seargent!!

Crap, I don't have any "hosted" images anywhere....I'll send dierctly to John...
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  #346  
Old July 21st, 2008, 02:10 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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  #347  
Old July 21st, 2008, 04:47 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
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From Pakistan:


Caption:

Pakistani Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz (C) examines a G3 rifle during a four-day International defence exhibition Ideas 2006 in Karachi, 22 November 2006. Around 230 companies from more than 50 countries, including the United States, France, Germany, China and Turkey, are participating in the annual show. Organisers said this year's theme was "Arms for Peace". Pakistan's military-run defence industry exports arms and ammunition worth 100 million dollars annually to countries in the Middle East, Asia and Africa. AFP PHOTO/Asif HASSAN (Photo credit should read ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

The caption is incorrect. That's not a G3 the Prime Minister is holding.

But what is it? I'm not sure. I think it's some POF development. The forend looks like G3K/G33 length with the molding for the sling snap in the wrong place. But the magazine well looks very long to me and the triangular corrugation follows the G3 pattern rather than the G33 pattern. I think it's some kind of G3K rechambered to .223. The plastic magazine is weirdo too. The main part of the magazine body is very short (probably .223) compared to the part of the magazine that sticks into the magazine well (probably .308). These magazines must look like shit outside of the weapon. The buttstock looks like a G33 buttstock and not a G3 buttstock.

The HK32 wannabe in the forend is also weirdo. The receiver length in the magazine well and ejection port area looks very G3 to me. You can see how the magazine well is longer than the magazine body. However, the buttstock is attached with a single locking pin rather than two. So I think this is a cut-down G3 receiver that has been rechambered for 7.62 X 39. It's also weird seeing a shorty/MP5 forend with a barrel that extends substantially in front of the front sight. Also note the lack of a grenade snap ring forward of the front sight. Definitely weirdo.

That POF HK32 on the modified G3 receiver is a departure from the Rheinmetall and Heckler & Koch HK32s. Here are some Rheinmetall HK32s:


Note how the caption states "with modified (fully locked) CETME breech action". I'd love to see which locking method Rheinmetall used in the G3 platform.

Here's the Rheinmetall HK32 with telescoping buttstock:


Note the caption: "gas-operated". Definitely weirdo. So the cocking tube on this HK32 actually connects with the barrel. (HK cocking tubes look as if they are connected to the barrel through the front sight base, but the cocking tube doesn't touch the barrel and the barrel is free-floated.) So this thing could be an AK with improved selector and the cocking handle on the correct side for right-handed shooters.

Note also how the buttstock is attached with two locking pins like the G3 and not a single locking pin like the MP5 and G33. Also, the trigger housing is not secured with a single locking pin just behind the magazine well. Instead, the rear of the forend is secured with a locking pin below the trunnion. Definitely weirdo.

Buttstock collapsed:


As far as I can tell, these Rheinmetall HK32s use the standard AK magazine.

Here's Heckler & Koch's prototype of the HK32:


You can see several differences between the HK and Rheinmetall prototypes. The HK buttstock is secured with double locking pins like the Rheinmetall prototype, but clearly the standard G3 magazine catch is present on the port side of the magazine well. The magazine looks to be a prototype HK magazine. The walnut forend looks hand-built and the barrel looks chopped and ported. The cocking tube also looks hand-built to me.

Here's a close-up of another prototype HK32 by Heckler & Koch:


This receiver almost looks like a converted G33 receiver. The magazine well's corrugations look identical to that of the G33 receivers. You can see, however, that there is no lateral magazine catch and that the flapper magazine release locks against the rear wall of the magazine, as with the MP5/10. I'm not sure what kind of magazine this is. It looks like an AK magazine but I'm not sure.

Also note the forend on this weapon. It looks like a slimline G3 forend. This is definitely different from the walnut forend on the previous HK32.

Here's a "production" version of the Heckler & Koch HK32:


I'm not sure if the HK32 ever made it to production. It may have been produced in very limited numbers. I'm not sure. But the general refinement of this particular HK32 leads me to think the design was pretty much finalized when this photo was taken.

You can see standard HK parts like the G33 forend, G3/G33 flash suppressor, G33 trigger housing and telescoping buttstock. This weapon looks factory.

Here's a close-up of what looks like the magazine for the weapon above:


The looks of this magazine are uninspiring. It could use some more design work.

All of these weapons rate as nothing more than footnotes in the development of the G3 platform, but they are interesting to me.

Also, is it just me or is the Prime Minister of Pakistan a Death Machine? Sure, he's no Jeff Cooper or anything. But for the leader of any country to sight a weapon with both eyes open and hold a weapon with trigger finger straight and thumb on the selector is sort of a big deal. Watch out for these Pakistanis.
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  #348  
Old July 21st, 2008, 09:31 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,160
Rheinmetall FG42:


FG42 in action:


U.S. Army Ordnance's early attempt to create a general-purpose machinegun from Wehrmacht designs:


This is the FG42 with the MG42's feed mechanism grafted onto the side. This Frankenweapon eventually became the M60 general-purpose machinegun. While only about 1500 FG42s were produced, its design lives on today in the M60.
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  #349  
Old July 21st, 2008, 10:59 PM
johnlee johnlee is online now
John Lee
K6YJ
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 16,160
Oh man. These are sweet.

Lego PSG1 on the left:


The PSG1 is a particular triumph of Lego design. The operator may hold the weapon by the pistol grip:


He may hold the weapon by the forend:


He may hold the weapon by the objective lens:


Or, he may get the two-handed action:


He can even aim the damn thing:


This is awesome. That Star Wars Lego crap that I grew up was limited to pistols and there was no aiming. This is another world.

Lego AG36K:


As with the PSG1, the Lego operator may hold the weapon by the grenade launcher:


The carrying handle is functional too:


Homeboy can even have a quiver for the AG36K:


MP7:


Mk23 with LAM:


There are a bunch of Lego guns available now:


Some of them are lame. Even that 10mm caseless pulse rifle from Aliens is in there. But the HK stuff is very cool. As soon as my nephew is old enough, I'm going to score him some Lego HKs.
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  #350  
Old July 22nd, 2008, 10:43 AM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
KI6CTP
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,491
These HK32 weapons, prototype or not, are the coolest HKs I've ever seen.




That corn cob forend is the shit.

I'm really digging the concept of the HK32 for use against ComBloc supplied nations or militias.

This is the pic that really does it for me:


The AK mag is so fucking good, why not design the weapon to use it? Especially if it means you can instantly replenish not only ammunition, but magazines directly from the corpses of your enemies. That's fucking awesome.

The furniture is nice too.

I'm also curious to hear an explanation of the method of operation in this Rheinmetall HK32. It would be sweet if it were some funky hybrid that actually worked. I'm also digging the idea of an HK weapon in 7.62x39 because it's so much closer to 7.92x33, but better in every way.

I wonder what these HK32s were like on full-auto?
I'm betting they were very shootable.

Suh-weet.
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