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  #351  
Old July 22nd, 2008, 11:51 AM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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For those who believe that only a Springfield, Garand, or M14 can look Uptown:

http://www.expeditionexchange.com/jo...alaceguard.JPG

That guard looks fucking awesome. And yet we cannot accept that the M16A2 is Uptown enough for our White House guards, Unknown Soldier guards, and military academy ceremonies.
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  #352  
Old July 22nd, 2008, 12:35 PM
greghirst greghirst is offline
Greg Hirst
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I don't think it's an "uptown" issue. I think it's a "too death machine" issue.
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  #353  
Old July 22nd, 2008, 01:18 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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It might be too Death Machine. But I believe it's more aesthetics.

Here are some West Point cadets:


They're looking bad ass, no doubt. But those M14s with chrome bayonets are glaring at me. I would like it so much better if they were using M16A2s with the current bayonets. To make it even better, I wish they were wearing those awesome West Point hats with the black feathers handing from the top. I love those hats. To make it Armageddon, replace the oxfords with black boots. Those fake patent leather oxfords don't look as "real" to me.

In contrast, here's Prince William at Sandhurst:


Even with that cheese SA80 cadet weapon, he's looking sharp. If he had some SMLE action, it wouldn't look as good. It would look wannabe Uptown.

Here's another pic of the Danish guards with the M16A2:


I dig that mix of new weapon and traditional uniform. You can tell that weapon has seen field service too. The parkerizing is worn on the high spots. The black oxide on the bayonet is also worn from poking things. That looks bitchin. Pay for these guards must be good too. Homeboy is sporting a Datejust.

Here's an older pic of the Danish guards with the G3:


I count five G3s visible there. The G3 on the far left has the plastic furniture fitted, while the others look to be walnut. I kind dig the mix. I wish wish they had the 20-round magazines fitted. Even the G3 with green plastic furniture would look awesome in that pic.
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  #354  
Old July 22nd, 2008, 02:34 PM
nosivad_bor nosivad_bor is offline
Rob Davison
 
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Location: Pittsburgh, PA
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What's the cultural significance of the strap under the lip. PA state troopers used to wear that shit I think it is the completely ridiculous and laughable.
____________________
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1999 Discovery 1

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  #355  
Old July 22nd, 2008, 03:19 PM
Nadir_E
 
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Might be 'tactical' in the sense that if you got into a scuffle with someone while wearing the strap fully under your chin they could use your helmet+strap to strangle you (or at least more easily maneuver your head around). Worn under the lip the helmet will simply come off in such a struggle. Among the reasons many militaries adopted short hair - couldn't be grabbed in a fight. Nowadays things like these are hold-overs from days of yore.
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  #356  
Old July 22nd, 2008, 04:33 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nosivad_bor
What's the cultural significance of the strap under the lip.

I'm not sure what the reason is. As Nadir said, it might be functional.

But I'm guessing it's more for looks than function. It's a very handsome look. With the strap under the chin, you would get fat poking out around the chinstrap. You don't get the fat with the strap under the lower lip.

It might also be symbolic with the strap under the lower lip, as in "give me orders and I'll do what you order me to do and I won't say anything". That, or something like "don't even talk to me because I'm not going to answer your sorry ass". I kind of get that feel from this guy:


I can imagine some tourist making some stupid gestures at this guard. This guard is probably thinking something like: "You punk ass tourist. You're lucky you're visiting a country of law and order. Were it otherwise, I'd ventilate you right here and now for your stupidity. You notice my M16A2's ejection port cover? Yeah, it's open. You know why it's open? Because I just capped some chump like you a few minutes ago, that's why. Now get your sorry ass out of here before I repeat the same performance on you. Yeah, all I have is 10 shots in this magazine. But all I need is one to ruin to your day. Get out of here. And get yourself a real watch you chump."

Quote:
Originally Posted by nosivad_bor
PA state troopers used to wear that shit I think it is the completely ridiculous and laughable.

Sure, I can see it looking stupid with the state police wearing the strap. I can only imagine how silly the California Highway Patrol would look with the strap under their cheeseball hats.

But on these weirdo ceremonial hats the straps look bad ass:


Those hats and chin straps are awesome. And I hate gold. I love how you don't see their eyes. That looks so sinister. And even their foul-weather gear is kick ass:


Love the boots too. No fake patent leather oxfords there. The real deal.

What are those palace guard hats made of? Dead bears or something? They're awesome. That sort of reminds of this pic of the young Winston Churchill:


What's cooler than dead animals on your head?

Here's that West Point hat with the black feathers:


That's awesome.
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  #357  
Old July 22nd, 2008, 05:48 PM
dchapman dchapman is online now
Daniel Chapman
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Quote:
It might also be symbolic with the strap under the lower lip, as in "give me orders and I'll do what you order me to do and I won't say anything".

Will EE be stocking these helmets? I've been looking to get Tami something like this for a while.
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  #358  
Old July 22nd, 2008, 06:40 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Another sweet hat:


Not only does this hat feature dead animals, it features dead humans. That's awesome.

Even his daughter is in on the action:


Quote:
7th October 1914: Cecilie, the German Crown Princess (1886 - 1954, right), dressed in the uniform of a Dragoon with Princess Victoria Louise (1892 - 1980), the only daughter of Kaiser Wilhelm II, dressed in the uniform of the Death's Head Hussar. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
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  #359  
Old July 23rd, 2008, 02:19 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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  #360  
Old July 23rd, 2008, 02:47 PM
Nadir_E
 
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John - is that a C-Mag for an MP-5? Are those as unreliable as they are reputed to be in the M-16 family?

Jack - with you on liking the k-model HK's - the carbine length G3 is one of my favorites (was supposed to be supplied to German tankers as I understand it, but I don't think it was ever actually issued). Something about a carbine....

Also, if memory serves, Knights Armament did a variant of the AR that accepts AK magazines, but it wasn't an issue weapon.
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  #361  
Old July 23rd, 2008, 04:42 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Yeah, that's a C-Mag on an MP5. I'm not sure if these C-mags are reliable or not, as I have zero experience with them. I notice that Beta sells graphite powder for these magazines. That's not a good sign from my perspective. On the other hand, lots of companies including Heckler & Koch sell the C-Mags as "factory" parts, so I have to wonder.

I just thought it was a cool pic. I dig the copper-colored primers on the nickeled cases. It looks cool.
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  #362  
Old July 23rd, 2008, 06:46 PM
Nadir_E
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
Yeah, that's a C-Mag on an MP5. I'm not sure if these C-mags are reliable or not, as I have zero experience with them. I notice that Beta sells graphite powder for these magazines. That's not a good sign from my perspective. On the other hand, lots of companies including Heckler & Koch sell the C-Mags as "factory" parts, so I have to wonder.

Testing in Afghanistan suggested it's not soldier/terrain proof yet: http://www.defendamerica.mil/article.../a072803b.html

I've also heard rumors (Grain of Salt) that members of the Special Operations world came to the same conclusion, but I expect they put stuff through a much more serious work-out than the average Joe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
I just thought it was a cool pic. I dig the copper-colored primers on the nickeled cases. It looks cool.

Industrial design is cool - I think that's part of why certain weapons, vehicles, hell even pens and pencils appeal to us. When it's mated with reliability you get real value - which explains our love for certain things - like, say, nice watches!
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  #363  
Old July 23rd, 2008, 06:50 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Homeboy owns a PSG1:


I'm so envious. He also has the transit case and tripod.

I just wish he didn't dump the Hensoldt factory telescope. I think that's a Leupold on there. The scope is too long for that rifle, and the cocking handle is hitting the objective lens. And that jizz spotting spotting scope isn't helping the pic either.

But overall I think it's a sweet pic. Judging by his PSG1, this guy probably has a pile of cool stuff mixed in with an even larger pile of terrible stuff. But I'm guessing he has a lot.
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  #364  
Old July 23rd, 2008, 07:23 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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It looks as if the latest G36 variants are coming standard with the XM8's magazine release and bolt release:


You can see that this weapon's receiver is stamped "G36KV".

To my knowledge, I think the "KV" is just the current designation of the previous "KE". I think "E" stands for "Export" or something similar in German. So I think the "G36KV" just stands for "G36, Kurz (short), Export". Consequently, I don't think the XM8 magazine and bolt releases are anything special and are just standard fitment on the latest G36 variants. Nice.
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  #365  
Old July 25th, 2008, 06:54 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Turkish variant of the G33:


The Turks have a very interesting variant of the G33. The tropical forend with sling snap and A2 buttstocks are green. This is hardly unusual. However, the pictogram trigger housing is also green. The vast majority of pictogram trigger housings are black, even if the buttstock and forend are green.

The lighting in that pic is bad for showing the green trigger housing. This pic shows the green better:


It's too bad the turks didn't specify that the paint on their G33s be green as well. I think an all-green G33 would look awesome. The Swedes paint their FNC variants green:


I think the all-green thing looks sharp.

The cocking handle on the Turkish G33s is the extended, HK21-style cocking handle. This cocking handle looks like this:


This cocking handle is substantially longer and wider than the standard rubberized cocking handles typically found on G33s, G33SG/1s, and HK93s, the handle part of which looks like these G3 cocking handles:


The magazines on the Turkish G33s are the 30-round type. You can tell by looking at them that they're not as long as the very long 40-round type, but they're visibly longer than the 25-shot magazines.

Here is a good view of some various magazines for the G33:


I think that pic was taken before the 30-round magazines came out. Here are the 30-shot magazines compared to the 25-shot version:


Here's an HK43 fitted with the 40-shot magazine:


Here's a G33 with the 30-shot magazine:


Here's an HK43 with what looks like a 25-shot magazine:


This HK43 looks to be fitted with the 20-shot magazine:


That Harrington & Richard 20-shot magazine is interesting. The corrugations are completely different from standard G33 magazines. There are other differences. Note the large corrugation in the rear wall of the magazine:


This large corrugation is there to accommodate the hold-open follower. These prototype Harrington & Richardson G33s were fitted with hold-open devices:


The trigger housing looks at first glance like the standard SEF trigger housing except for the markings. But note the lever in front of the trigger. This is the bolt release. It's somewhat similar to the XM8's bolt release and may be actuated from either side of the weapon, but the user presses this lever forward rather than down to release the bolt forward.

Standard G33s do not have a hold-open device. Like the AK, the bolt will go forward into battery over an empty magazine. The same is true for the MP5 and G3 as well.

This boxy magazine may have been the original configuration for the G33 magazine. I'm not sure. At least the caption on this pic of a prototype G33 suggests that:


I would think that the prototype for the standard G33 would have come before the prototype for the G33K:


You can see that HK was still in the experimental stage for 5.56 magazines when its engineers created the G33K prototype. This curved magazine looks to hold 30 rounds, and the corrugations and floorplate arrangement look very different from production G33 magazines.

While I'm bummed HK didn't fit the production G33 and its variants with a hold-open device, I'm very glad HK didn't adopt that boxy magazine with the horizontal corrugations. I think that magazine looks terrible. It doesn't even look like the MkB42(H)/MkB42(W)/MP43/MP44/StG44/StG45(M) magazines. One of the things that is so cool about the G33 is that it's basically a modern-day sturmgewehr. The G33 is much more than an "assault rifle". It's a true sturmgewehr. These boxy magazines take away some of that pedigree. That boxy magazine also looks weak, with a minimum amount of corrugations going vertically with the magazine body. That magazine also lacks the horizontal corrugations near the floorplate.

Various magazines, A3 buttstock, magazine clamps, and sight tools for the G33:


Homeboy has a nice stash.
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  #366  
Old July 26th, 2008, 09:21 PM
Nadir_E
 
Posts: n/a
I like the 25-round magazine for the opposite reason I dislike the 40-round - the 25-rounder enables a fairly low prone firing position while the 40-rounder basically prohibits it. A 40-round magazine would make somewhat more sense if the weapon had a heavy barrel and was intended as a fire-team or squad-level support weapon.

John - speaking of support weapons, have you studied the HK line of belt-fed machine guns? I seem to recall they were very highly regarded in military-/para-military circles.
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  #367  
Old July 26th, 2008, 10:29 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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All of my HK43s are the 25-shot type. These are by far the most common type. Second in abundance are the 40-shot type, which I dislike because of their great length. Sure, they make the HK33/43/93 look like the StG44. However, they're too long and clumsy I think.

I've never even seen the 20- and 30-shot magazines in person. I believe the 30-shot type is the new standard for G33 magazines, or what's left of G33 use.

I tried to get some five-shot magazines for my HK43 a few years ago but couldn't find any when I looked. If some turn up I'll score a few.

I know very little about the HK machineguns, because I can't own any machineguns and I'm more interested in personal smallarms like rifles, carbines, shotguns, machine pistols, and pistols than I am in true machineguns. I know, however, that the roller-delayed machineguns weren't successful and lost by a wide margin to recoil- and gas-operated machineguns.

The HK roller-delayed machineguns suffer from several deficiencies. For one, the the feed mechanism is under the weapon rather than on top. This is a weirdo position. Note that Kalashnikov machineguns have the gas piston inverted relative to the barrel so that the feed mechanism can remain on top. HK wouldn't want to do this on its weapons because it would ruin the family look of the HK roller-delayed weapons.

Roller-delayed machineguns also suffer from a lack of regulation that gas-operated guns enjoy. That is, gas-operated machineguns may be dialed up for more gas pressure into the operation mechanism when the weapon gets very hot and dirty. Roller-delayed weapons have no gas regulator, so they must be set to operate on maximum at all times. This reduces component life and necessitates things like recoil buffers to attenuate the slamming of of the parts.

There are several roller-delayed machineguns in history, but they have never enjoyed the success of recoil-operated guns like the M2 or Maxim, or gas-operated guns like the MAG or PKM.

I'm not positive on this point, but I believe the first roller-delayed machinegun was the MG45:


I think it was called the MG45. This weapon was also known as the MG42V. It was a variant of the famous MG42 and was intended to simplify and speed production of the MG42. Germany was on its last legs, and even the MG42 took too long to produce for the Germans.

The MG42's method of operation almost defies categorization. Most authorities describe the MG42's method of operation as gas-assisted roller-locked short recoil. The barrel moves rearward with the bolt carrier and the two are locked together for the start of the rearward cycle with rollers. I believe the action is described as "gas assisted" because of the accelerator chamber just forward of the barrel jacket:


Gas pressure is trapped in the chamber in front of the barrel and helps to push the barrel rearward. It appears as if excess gas in the chamber is exhausted out of the side vent holes. From what little I gather, the MG42 will not operate reliably in dirty conditions without this accelerator.

In contrast, the MG45's barrel is fixed. It is still interchangeable to prevent overheating, but the barrel is locked in place at all times during the recoil cycle. Thus, the MG45 is not a "recoil-operated" weapon like the Maxim or M2. The MG45's bolt does not lock against the barrel extension. The method of operation is roller-delayed blowback. Many refer to this system as "semi-rigid". Others refer to this system as "roller-locked blowback", which is oxymoronic because blowback refers to an unlocked bolt. Still others refer to this system as "half-locked blowback", which I think is clumsy as well. A breech is either locked or it's not. It's like being half-pregnant or half-alive. It ain't happening. I like "roller-delayed blowback" the best. The rollers do not lock the breech. Rather, they act as a mechanical disadvantage to the forces trying to open the unlocked breech, and the rollers act to delay opening of the breech until chamber pressures reach a safe level for opening.

I'm not sure if the MG45 ever made it past the experimental stage. Again, I know very little about machineguns. But I really have to wonder if it would have worked as well as the MG42 had the MG45 made it to widespread production. I doubt it would have. After World War II, the winners adopted the weapons ideas of the losers. Germany may have lost the war, but both the free world and the ComBloc countries adopted not only the assault rifle concept, but also the general-purpose machinegun concept. And to my knowledge, very few countries adopted the MG45 idea. I remember a French roller-delayed machinegun and there was some Swiss version also. However, numerous countries adopted the MG42. Rheinmetall also didn't develop the MG45 and went with the MG42 design for post-war production.

Another roller-delayed machinegun is the CETME Ameli:


Many believe the Ameli is a miniature MG42 because of its appearance, but it's not. It's a mini MG45, not a mini MG42. From what little I know about the Ameli, it's not a reliable weapon.
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  #368  
Old July 28th, 2008, 08:47 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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I did some Googling for that Swiss roller-delayed machinegun and found the SIG-710:


Obviously, the 710 draws inspiration from the MG42.

Here are a pic of the bolt assembly and the layout:


Unlike the HK roller-delayed weapons, the bolt head tapers toward the breech end of the chamber. I'm not sure, but it looks as though the roller recesses are in the receiver and not the barrel extension, and it looks as though the roller recesses are removable from the receiver for replacing as they inevitably wear with heavy use.

The rollers look like actual rollers, like the HK system. This is distinctly different from the "rollers" on the StG57 and SIG 510, which look like this in cross section:


You can see that the StG57 and SIG 510 have hinged rollers. Many refer to this system as "flaps" rather than rollers. Others refer to this system as rollers, although the rollers are not free to rotate as they are on the HK system.

In the top pic, the bolt is fully in battery and the locking piece is pushing the rollers/flaps into their receiver recesses. When the cartridge is fired and immediately starts pushing against the bolt head with tremendous pressure, the rollers/flaps are forced inward. This movement of the rollers/flaps toward the axis of the weapon press inward against the locking piece with great force. The locking piece, and the bolt carrier to which the locking piece is mechanically locked, is propelled backward with great force and these two pieces continue moving rearward from the momentum from the initial push from the rollers/flaps that initially pushed them rearward. On the HK system, the bolt carrier is propelled rearward at three times the velocity of the bolt head, and I'm guessing the SIG system is similar.

The locking piece continues backward a short distance while the bolt head remains largely stationery, during which time the projectile can shoot out of the muzzle and chamber pressures can reduce to a safe level. By the time the bolt carrier has moved rearward sufficiently that it begins to pull on the bolt head, the locking piece has moved rearward a sufficient distance that the rollers/flaps are free to to move inward completely and the bolt head is pulled rearward by the bolt carrier, and the entire bolt assembly moves rearward to begin the extraction and ejection phases of the weapon's cycle.

It's a beautiful thing. Equally beautiful is the SIG bolt assembly:


That thing is stunning. It makes the HK bolt assembly look crude in comparison. To my way of looking at things, that is the most beautiful bolt assembly of any weapon around. Just look at that extractor! And its spring is equally beautiful. Only in Switzerland.

In fact, I must say that the SIG 510 is the most beautiful rifle ever created. This thing is a stunner:


Stamped sheetmetal. Walnut furniture. Roller-delayed blowback. Superb craftsmanship. General appearance only a mother could love. Funky winter trigger. I wish only that the 510 had the StG57's micrometer rear sight rather than the FALish rear sight. It's sort of a good thing that it doesn't. If the 510 had the StG57's micrometer rear sight, then it would be too much for the soul to bear. Just looking at such a weapon would cause instant death.
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  #369  
Old July 28th, 2008, 09:17 PM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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Jack might like this 510:


I kinda dig it myself. It looks like a Lego gun.
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  #370  
Old July 28th, 2008, 10:32 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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Of course I do.

It's got a lot going for it:

1. Kalashnikov magazine.
2. K31 cocking handle.
3. FG42ish buttstock.
4. Mini-14 180 series stumpy handguard.
5. SAW FN Minimi pistol grip.
6. Bergmann MG15 ventilated barrel shroud.
7. Overall Star Wars blaster appearance.

That Sig 510 looks like the designers got a call from the future.
They tried to forward that call to the rest of the world, but they were on another line and the voicemail box was full.

Kind of like the Enfield EM-2 or "Janson Rifle":


This weapon was designed in 1947 and there's hardly anything about it that wasn't revolutionary including it's .280 chambering.

However, nobody got it and it never made it to the show.
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  #371  
Old July 28th, 2008, 10:34 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee
That thing is stunning. It makes the HK bolt assembly look crude in comparison. To my way of looking at things, that is the most beautiful bolt assembly of any weapon around. Just look at that extractor! And its spring is equally beautiful. Only in Switzerland.

Holy shit.
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  #372  
Old July 28th, 2008, 10:52 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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Here's a nice pic of a BREN fresh off the line that I just had to share:


Remember, L.S.M.F.T!
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  #373  
Old July 29th, 2008, 09:22 AM
johnlee johnlee is offline
John Lee
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So long as we're talking funk, I give you the HK36:


Method of operation is still roller-delayed blowback. However, the configuration of the weapon differs from the G3 variants in several respects.

The cocking handle is very G36, with a cocking handle that is co-axial with the weapon's centerline and swings to the side of the weapon for use. I presume the cocking handle can swing to either side as on the G36.

The back plate and buttstock are held with two locking pins, but the configuration is similar to the MP5K and G41 models, with one locking pin at the top and one at the bottom.

Also note the fishtail buttstock reminiscent of the MG34, MG42, and FG42 buttstock designs. I cannot tell if the buttstock's tube contained a long recoil spring as on the AR and the StG45(M). By it's relatively low location on the receiver, I'm going to guess not. It appears to me that the recoil spring is still connected at the top of the bolt carrier and the buttstock tube doesn't contain anything.

As on the AR variants, this buttstock was adjustable for length of pull:


It would be awesome if HK fitted some kind of pneumatic or hydraulic buffer into the buttstock, so that the weapon would jostle around less during fire.

I'm not sure where the magazine release is on this particular weapon. But it appears to feature a detachable magazine. Later variants of the HK36 have a fixed magazine:


This fixed magazine was one of the HK36's two claims to fame. The fixed magazine was designed to use disposable cartridge inserts. The user could cock the follower spring and lock it open by hinging the lower arm rearward. Then he would insert a clip of cartridges and close the magazine wall. This system was designed to eliminate the weight of magazines. I'm not sure how sound this idea is, but it's certainly funky.

The HK36's other claim to fame was weirdo ammunition. The bullet micro-caliber bullet had a flat spot near the point, which was designed to maximize yawing. HK designed this projectile at a time when most people believed that the wounding power of these micro-caliber projectiles came from yawing rather than from fragmentation. Sorry, but I don't have any pics of the HK36's ammunition.

The serrated square just at the front of the trigger housing looks to me like a bolt release. I'm guessing the HK36 had a hold-open feature.

Note the selector positions. The burst position is after the automatic position. This is different from the majority of HK burst trigger packs, where the standard sequence is safe, semi, burst, and auto. This trigger housing also features the ribs and appearance of the SEF trigger housings, but the pistol grip is a simple taper like later pictogram housings rather than the ergonomic shape of the SEF housings. It also appears as though the trigger guard is removable or at least hinges out of the way for use with heavy winter gloves. This is the only HK that I can recall that has this feature.

This is a good view of the cocking tube. You can see the squarish top profile and how the cocking tube is largely integrated with the receiver lines rather than a separate tube as on the G3 variants. This is very G36.

The sight is weirdo on the HK36:


I think there's a miniature optical sight in there. I think it's a reflex type of sight. The carrying handle and large viewing aperture at the front are definitely weirdo.

The HK36 never made it to production and is just another footnote in battle carbine development. However, some of its design features live on today in the Heckler & Koch G36:

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  #374  
Old July 29th, 2008, 11:05 AM
Keith Armstrong Keith Armstrong is offline
Keith Armstrong
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Land between the rivers...
Posts: 117
Back to the actual title of this thread

I found a left handed 220 to add to my "normal" one...



...it's on its way to me as we speak.

Simple, black, big hole in one end...heck, works for me.
.
.
.
Yeah, I know...I'll move the mag release to the other side when it gets here...

Last edited by Keith Armstrong : July 29th, 2008 at 11:06 AM. Reason: ...more vital stuff...
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  #375  
Old July 29th, 2008, 02:38 PM
JSQ JSQ is offline
Jack Quinlan
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Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,490
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlee

In fact, I must say that the SIG 510 is the most beautiful rifle ever created. This thing is a stunner:


Stamped sheetmetal. Walnut furniture. Roller-delayed blowback. Superb craftsmanship. General appearance only a mother could love. Funky winter trigger. I wish only that the 510 had the StG57's micrometer rear sight rather than the FALish rear sight. It's sort of a good thing that it doesn't. If the 510 had the StG57's micrometer rear sight, then it would be too much for the soul to bear. Just looking at such a weapon would cause instant death.

You rang?

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