Staun Tire Deflators

 

Staun Light Duty Tire Deflators (SCVLD)

Staun Light Duty Tire Deflators (SCVLD) $88

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Staun Light Duty Tire Deflators thread onto your tires' valves stems and deflate them to your desired, preset pressure. The 7 PSI preset pressure is easily adjusted without tools from 0 to 10 PSI and the setting can be changed an infinite number of times.  Like all quality air fittings, the Staun Tire Deflators are constructed from solid brass for both corrosion resistance and resilience.  These are the perfect companion for your Power Tank. Use the Stauns to air down and the Power Tank to air up. Storage pouch included.

Staun Tire Deflators (SCV5)

Staun Tire Deflators (SCV5) $85

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Staun Tire Deflators thread onto your tires' valves stems and deflate them to your desired, preset pressure. The 18 PSI preset pressure is easily adjusted without tools from 6 to 30 PSI and the setting can be changed an infinite number of times.  Like all quality air fittings, the Staun Tire Deflators are constructed from solid brass for both corrosion resistance and resilience.  These are the perfect companion for your Power Tank. Use the Stauns to air down and the Power Tank to air up. Storage pouch included.

Staun Heavy Duty Tire Deflators (SCVHD) 

Staun Heavy Duty Tire Deflators (SCVHD) $88

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Staun Heavy Duty Tire Deflators thread onto your tires' valves stems and deflate them to your desired, preset pressure. The 35 PSI preset pressure is easily adjusted without tools from 15 to 55 PSI and the setting can be changed an infinite number of times.  Like all quality air fittings, the Staun Tire Deflators are constructed from solid brass for both corrosion resistance and resilience.  These are the perfect companion for your Power Tank. Use the Stauns to air down and the Power Tank to air up. Storage pouch included.

 

Staun Tire Deflators

The concept for the Staun Tire Deflators was born in 1998 when Staun Product's two directors found themselves on a cramped barge with 50 offroad trucks on board. They noted that all of the vehicle owners, including themselves, were squatting between the vehicles with keys, matchsticks, and tire pressure gauges in hand, and flashlights in their mouths. Both men knew there had to be an easier way to deflate tires accurately and safely.  After two years of development and registry of a worldwide patent, the Staun Tire Deflators emerged. The device simply screws onto the tire valve stem and deflates to a preset pressure that is fully adjustable to suit each user's requirements.

Staun Tire Deflators

Airing down with the Staun Tire Deflators is very easy. Simply screw a deflator onto each of the four valves on your vehicle. The Stauns will begin releasing air from your tires and will stop at a target pressure preset by you. Adjustment of the Stauns is very easy and is controlled by the adjustment knob on the top of the deflators. The lock ring prevents inadvertent changes in the pressure desired, but permits easy resetting of the pressure at which you want the deflators to stop.

Staun Tire Deflators

The Staun Tire Deflators we sell are the latest models. The Stauns have undergone constant development and refinement since they first hit the market. On the left is an older Staun with a plastic nipple. The next version of the Stauns featured a relocated output hole, different knurling on the adjustment cap, and a brass nipple. The current generation Stauns feature a different adjustable cap with sharper knurling, as well as a longer nipple with a slotted tip.

Staun Tire Deflators

Here is what the nipples look like when they are removed from the bodies. The slotted tip of the latest Stauns is clearly visible.

Staun Tire Deflators

The slotted tip makes the current Stauns slightly easier to use. Sometimes it is necessary to pull on the nipple to get the Stauns started. This is common when the the tires sought to be deflated are already at a low pressure. Other deflators require a certain pressure differential for the deflators to get started. For example, if the deflator is set to 15 PSI and the tires contain 20 PSI, the deflators may not deflate when threaded onto the valve stems. The tires actually have to be aired up before some automatic deflators will work. This is not true of the Stauns, which can be initiated by pulling on the nipple to get the deflator started. Even if your Staun is set to 15 PSI and your tires contain 18 PSI, the Stauns will still work and there is no need to air up your tires to get your Stauns to work. The longer nipple with slotted tip on the latest Stauns makes them slightly more grippy and easier to use.

You may have seen another type of deflator on the market. This deflator works on the same principle as the Stauns, but is an inferior design because it requires a large pressure differential to initiate deflating. For example, if your tires are filled with 25 PSI and this deflator is set to 20 PSI, this deflator may or may not begin deflating when you thread it onto the valve stem. Unlike the Staun Tire Deflators, this deflator cannot be initiated by pulling on the nipple because there is no nipple. Many users of this deflator design report having to inflate their tires even more to achieve the tire pressure necessary to initiate deflation. There is no such problem with the Staun Tire Deflators.

Staun Tire Deflators (SCVLD) Staun Tire Deflators (SCV5) Staun Tire Deflators (SCVHD)

The original Staun Tire Deflators are available three different air pressure ranges to suit various vehicle weights, tire sizes, and trail conditions. The Light Duty Tire Deflators are adjustable from 0 to 10 PSI. The standard Tire Deflators are adjustable from 6 to 30 PSI. The Heavy Duty Tire Deflators are adjustable from 15 to 55 PSI.

Why air down at all? To most seasoned offroaders, the benefits of reducing tire pressure on the trails is well known.  Most veteran offroaders routinely air down their tires before entering a trail,

or air down even further on the trail when the trail conditions call for it. 

At the trail head it is common to see people airing down with keys and pressure gauges.

Staun Tire Deflators

With the Staun Tire Deflators, just thread them on and forget about them. They will stop at the proper pressure. The Stauns are so convenient and accurate, you'll be doing more of this:

and less of this:

No more pocketknives. No more keys. No more pressure gauges. Simply thread on the Stauns and you'll air down automatically.

The Stauns also greatly facilitate airing down at night or in low light. There is no need to read a pressure gauge. Just thread on the Stauns and remove them when they stop at your preset pressure.

REMA Metal Sealing Valve Cap

Just remember to remove the Stauns and refit your REMA Metal Sealing Valve Caps before you hit the trail. The last thing you want to do is lose one or more of your Stauns.

Tires filled to road pressures are optimized for the high speeds and high-traction conditions found on today's roads. These pressures are too high for the slow speeds and low-traction surfaces of offroad trails. Generally speaking, the larger and more pliable a tire's footprint, the more traction it will provide. On very soft surfaces like soft sand, airing down will distribute the vehicle's weight over a larger surface area and help to prevent the tires from digging.  On other types of trails, the increased deformation of a deflated tire's tread and sidewalls will grip rocks and uneven obstacles better than a hard tire will.  However, the more the tire is deflated, the more susceptible the tire's sidewalls are to damage.  Accordingly, the tire's pressures should suit the trail conditions for best results.  The "correct" tire pressure will also depend on the weight you are carrying and just how soft or hazardous the surface is. Just how much you let you tires down is a question of personal taste that is achieved through trial and error on various trails.

Soft sand will generally call for a very low tire pressure.  Very soft sand permits a vehicle with hard tires to dig very easily and get stuck.  The larger and more pliable surface of a deflated tire will help the vehicle "float" better on very soft sand.  Sand also does not present the sidewall hazards of sharp rocks, permitting one to air down a great deal without increasing the probability of a sidewall puncture or tear.

A trail with lots of vertical ledges generally calls for a lower tire pressure.  Softer and more pliable tires will be better able to conform and crawl over such obstacles whereas a hard tire will tend to need an initial burst of speed and momentum to get it started up and over the ledge.

Mud presents a different concern.  There are two primary theories on mud driving.  One theory calls for maximum floatation using wide tires aired down to get a vehicle over the mud.  Another theory calls for hard and narrow tires to cut through the mud's initial surface to contact the hard ground below.  Both theories are valid and both theories work with different kinds of mud.  The cutting theory works well on mud that is not very deep but does not work where the soft mud is effectively bottomless.  Generally speaking, airing down tires to suit the local conditions is the best way to deal with mud.

A tight trail with lots of rocky obstacles and hazards may, ironically, require a higher tire pressure in order to minimize the likelihood of sidewall damage to the tires. Trails like the Rubicon are very hard on tires and wheels because they are so narrow and tend to pinch tires.

No matter what pressure you air down to, you must air back up before you head home.  The deformation in deflated tires will cause dangerous heat build up in the tires at highway speeds.  The gas station near the end of the trail may or may not have air for you to use after you fill up your fuel tank.

However, you cannot rely on a gas station that might not be there or might have a broken air compressor. You need your own onboard air supply. Our favorite method of airing up tires is the Power Tank because its great speed and ability to run air tools on the trail.